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How'd it go today?

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
Joined
Jun 30, 2008
Messages
34,202
Location
Near Yosemite in CA USA
Yeah, i got tired of waiting for wifey to clean out the back porch fridge thats been sitting over a year. Went in with a hazmat suit and the tractor. Dump trailers are awesome to dispose of things you would rather not handle and can pick up and load with a tractor. She lost a ton of 1/2 gallon ball jars and glass cake pans. Oh well.
 

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
Joined
Jun 30, 2008
Messages
34,202
Location
Near Yosemite in CA USA
Sort of like what we do after a fire. We can only keep things cold for so long. Sometimes they will place a neighborhood dumpster on the corner of our property at the intersection.
 

lxskllr

Treehouser
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
2,324
Location
MD USA
Went into work, played on the computer, then came home. Work's been pretty slow lately. Not really a problem for me, but it's also hot out, and I don't like doing stuff in the heat. I've got some forestry related stuff I can do, but nothing too urgent, so it's hard to get motivated to get out in 87° weather, and run machines. Saving my locust for later in the week. Right now I'm sweat free, so I don't even have to take a shower. I'm ready to roll for tomorrow :^D
 

Jonny

Treehouser
Joined
Sep 29, 2018
Messages
1,500
Location
Buffalo, NY
@lxskllr Did ya get your Tsurugi blades yet? Medium tooth is plenty aggressive I think. I might order a few more before they’re gone. Hell I’ll drill a hole in one and see how it does on a pole saw.
 

lxskllr

Treehouser
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
2,324
Location
MD USA
No, not yet. I don't know how long Gempler typically takes to ship. I ordered last week on the 23rd, so not too long for a company that isn't amazon.
 

Fiddler

Treehouser
Joined
Jun 29, 2009
Messages
7,765
Location
Michigan
Long day today...extra projects planned (none got done...boss planned them yesterday and then went to hospital today), flat tire on tractor first thing in the morning (two trips to the tire store), sis called in middle of my day & needed ride, now, to vet. Not one of the close ones...20 mi north of town! back to work...mowed the conservation club next door to the course, finished up my other stuff...then Mrs. boss wants to chit chat & wants some extra things done. Ah well, breakfast at 4pm was welcome....
 

lxskllr

Treehouser
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
2,324
Location
MD USA
Sounds like tedious day Fiddler. One of those days where you're doing lots of stuff, but don't feel like you're getting anything done, eh? Kyle's philosophy's technically true, but it sure as hell doesn't make it better at the time. Kind of like grabbing a nice fistful of rosa multiflora cause it feels good when you stop :^P

Just got in from checking the mail, and the saw blades came! You're right Jonny. The medium looks plenty aggressive. I think that shorty will work out pretty well as a work saw. I'm gonna mull over handles for a bit. Your garden hose idea looks credible. Wood would be nice, but a lot more work. Perhaps rubber bumpers top and bottom, sticks in middle, and a paracord wrap? While typing, I'm thinking of an EasySet pool I had for a brief period. It was a PITA, but I learned I hated having a pool for not much money :^D The vinyl is in the garage. It's pretty thick, and that might be worked into a handle of some kind...
 

Fiddler

Treehouser
Joined
Jun 29, 2009
Messages
7,765
Location
Michigan
haha...even with all the running around and frustrations it was a good day (just over twice as long as usual)....things went far more smoothly than they could have, and I did get a lot done.
 

lxskllr

Treehouser
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
2,324
Location
MD USA
Can't say it went per plan, but I got it...


20200630_160143.jpg 20200630_160138.jpg

I'm still not really comfortable up there. I dropped the end, and aside from bouncing the limb(weirded me out a bit), it fell perfectly. I went back to the stem to consider my next move. I wasn't sure I was up to rigging down the rest, but I figured I'd setup my ArborPlex, and decide after I finished knotting it. No ArborPlex... I look down, and it's sitting at the base of the tree. I didn't properly secure it... Contemplate using my lanyard, but then decide to just drop the pieces. I able to do that without hitting anything important on the ground. I did drop some through the white oak limbs which violates my 'no touch' policy, but I don't think I have the skill at this point to maintain that policy. 'Don't destroy anything' is probably good enough for now.

Huge thanks to @SkwerI ! Your comment about walking the side of the limb really hit home. That was a big lightbulb moment. I'm kinda pissed at myself for not figuring it out on my own, but c'est la vie. I got it, and it's more helpful than you can imagine. I just need to control my head, and trust my gear to make the most of it. Left my throwline in the tree. It'll probably be there til fall. It's that crappy Weaver line that I hate with a passion, but this is a good use for it. I have zero cares about that line, so if anything happens to it, it matters not.

Side note... I have some worn out summer weight combat boots, and they make fantastic rope climbing boots. The rubber's soft, and they grip limbs really well. Not a lot of life left, but they'll be my dedicated rope boots til they're gone.
 

Tree09

Treehouser
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
5,309
Location
Peoria il
If you learn what a snap cut is, you can cut and chuck the pieces to a suitable landing zone. This obviously only works on pieces you can handle. Tree climbing isn't really natural, you have to learn/ be taught it.
 

lxskllr

Treehouser
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
2,324
Location
MD USA
The sag cuts(?) worked out well. That allowed me to clear everything, before finishing the cut. My intention was to use my rope loops to tie the pieces off, girth hitch one end of the Arborplex, go through the loop, then take a bunch of wraps on the keeper limb. I'd then cut the piece, the ArborPlex would catch it, and I could then lower it easy, and bring up the end after the limb was down, and repeat. As it turns out, that would have added an unnecessary complication.
 

Sven

Treehouser
Joined
May 22, 2020
Messages
21
Location
Maine
Cleaning up homeowner piles of last fall’s big storm in the rain. Chipper died two weeks ago so back to chainsaw-chopping in a dump trailer for a month. Days rarely suck like that, but better working for oneself than as a $20/hr employee.
 

Marc-Antoine

TreeHouser
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
1,773
Location
France
As it turns out, that would have added an unnecessary complication.
Unnecessary for this time perhaps, but it would have been a good exercise. Take every chance you get to train yourself and test new things. If not, you'll try it only when it will be mandatory. Not a good way to solve a problem.
 

SkwerI

Treehouser
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Messages
17,878
Location
central Florida
The sag cuts(?) worked out well. That allowed me to clear everything, before finishing the cut. My intention was to use my rope loops to tie the pieces off, girth hitch one end of the Arborplex, go through the loop, then take a bunch of wraps on the keeper limb. I'd then cut the piece, the ArborPlex would catch it, and I could then lower it easy, and bring up the end after the limb was down, and repeat. As it turns out, that would have added an unnecessary complication.
Years and years ago I read about the Coo's Bay cut from Gerry Beranek right here on this forum. I can't find the original thread but here's one where he retells the story- Beranek's Coos Bay felling cut vs. Burnham's - https://www.masterblasterhome.com/threads/beraneks-coos-bay-felling-cut-vs-burnhams.9410/

Over the years I've used the basic idea of this cut and adopted it to do most of my limbing cuts aloft. It is now one of my favorite and most used cuts. I'm too lazy to make three separate cuts but I use the same approach just blending it all into one continuous cut. On big horizontal limbs I reach over and start my cut on the far side, then bring my saw over the top and cut in on the near side. Then I finish up by rolling my saw over the top and down through the cut. By adjusting how far I undercut the limb I can modify how quickly it jumps off or how much it swings back. The worst part about just top cutting a limb and letting it swing back is when they peel back several inches and hang on without dropping. By modifying how wide the uncut wood is, you can affect how much it peels back.
 

Raj

TreeHouser
Joined
Oct 26, 2013
Messages
7,077
Location
Brantford, Ontario
Only small jobs for me lately, chipping brush for other tree guys who left messes for home owners. Not much room, thankfully I fit no problem with the F150 and my befco chipper.
 

SeanKroll

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 13, 2016
Messages
7,525
Location
Olympia, WA
If you learn what a snap cut is, you can cut and chuck the pieces to a suitable landing zone. This obviously only works on pieces you can handle. Tree climbing isn't really natural, you have to learn/ be taught it.
I would say it only works on pieces you can guide into the landing zone.
"Pool English" on gravity's effect.
I aim never to hold a piece if I can just cut the snapcut well, and then be able to break the piece free, and guide it enough, with a shove or pull, with gravity doing most of it.


The "English" of the pushing chain allows a sawyer to cut off a branch stub, drop the saw below the falling stub, and back-chain/ pushing chain flick the stub out from area (less rollers under foot when ground workers are clearing brush).
You can back-chain loose, conventional, smaller face-cut wedges out of the face, and move right to the back cut (Humbodt face-cut wedges fall on their own).
 

Tree09

Treehouser
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
5,309
Location
Peoria il
Yeah i hardly ever lift/ muscle stuff. But just starting out, piecing the first limb of his life, solo, without rigging, snap cuts would be enough to make them fall left rather than right type thing. While learning rigging is clutch, the more you can do without it the better (for the most part obviously).
 

Marc-Antoine

TreeHouser
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
1,773
Location
France
You can back-chain loose, conventional, smaller face-cut wedges out of the face, and move right to the back cut (Humbodt face-cut wedges fall on their own).
It looks cool, but I'm not a fan of that, too much surprise from the path of the flying chunk. Once, the fly part wasn't deliberate and I broke a tile, last cut in a dismantle of an horsechesnut over a roof and a tiled fence wall.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
18,402
Location
Denmark
I went to work in the forest for the first time since my staircase stunt.
Running a weed whacker, clearing vegetation between new planted conifers.
8 hours with a weed whacker was a hard start up.
I'm bushed.

Thais dog was ecstatic to be back in the woods.
He is bushed, too.

Tomorrow I'll see iof I can run a saw. A small one, fortunately.
We have to cut some trees under some hi voltage power lines.
The trees have almost reached the lines and are started to draw sparks from them.
The forester who called me about it, said they look like weeds that have grown into an electric fence, all burned in the top.

They turn the power off for us, so it'll be an easy job.
If I can run the saw, that is.
 
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