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Before & After Tree Care

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
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Near Yosemite in CA USA
Indeed.
Plenty of material came out of the trees. Just enough to get the inspection hopefully and probably not need a visit for 3 years. I did advise a couple of problem areas where a larger leader or stem be removed due to a defect and continued maintenance cycle. They want it done in stages so not a visual shock to them. Find a happy medium and bank on more money in the future.
 

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
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Jun 30, 2008
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Near Yosemite in CA USA
Bump.
This is a story of a pine we did about 10 years ago. Got to see it again yesterday. Well, I kinda keep am eye on it every time I drive by the place :lol:
So this poor thing had its roots cut for a septic install, then a new driveway to compact them, then the IPS beetles moved in because it was stressed. So I went up and trimmed the infestation out as best I could. Mulched the RZ. Then prescribed Bayers Merit watered into the IMG_0590.JPG roots as treatment to stave off the little buggers. Of course some fish emulsion and super thrive as I recall. Then, after 5 years of treatment, we have the western pine beetle move in and kill about every pine around her neighborhood. With some exception. Told her to treat all her trees closest to the house. keep them mulched etc. So here we are now. So the first pic is yesterday. Second 10 years ago. About every pine on her place survived thus far.
 

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Bermy

Acolyte of the short bar
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May 3, 2008
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6,588
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Tasmania
Is Merit an imidicloprid product?
Love the combo of cultural and chemical treatment :)
 

lxskllr

Treehouser
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Jul 21, 2019
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MD USA
Chemical treatment would stress me out a bit if removal and treatment were equal options. I'd hate to say a tree could be saved, then have it go and die a year later. Makes you look stupid, and adds expense for the owner.
 

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
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Near Yosemite in CA USA
Indeed, she could afford it. And you always premise by saying....
No guarantees, but if you want to try and save the tree, this is your best chance.
Also letting the client know the up front cost and that it is a long term maintenance issue. You will be doing this for a long time annually.
Her trees averaged out at about 125.00 per. There were a mix of 18,24, 30 and 40" plus trees on the place.
 
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CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
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Jun 30, 2008
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Near Yosemite in CA USA
Little compartmentalization shot of an oak I removed mistletoe from a couple years ago. Basically cut it out of the cambium. Trying to make the tree think it has a tear out. Painted the wound with tar in spray form to keep the moisture in and I am pretty sure it does not help the mistletoe root. This one worked. That is a pretty substantial wound on the side of a vertical lead. Several in this grove seem to be doing well. IMG_0276.JPG
 

lxskllr

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What's the for and against regarding painting tree wounds? I know it used to be fairly common, but fell out of favor some time ago. I'm guessing you painted the wound to prevent some action starting the mistletoe again? I'm not familiar at all with mistletoe. If we have any around here, no one's pointed it out to me.
 

Tree09

Treehouser
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Feb 28, 2017
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Peoria il
I had the same question, does painting/tar on a large wound work? Or is it still pointless? Maybe epoxy?
 

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
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Near Yosemite in CA USA
Under certain circumstances it is helpful. Most arbs don't paint wounds any more as it has proven to not necessarily be beneficial or necessary for the health and callousing of the wound in current arb practice. However, since we are a very hot and dry climate, it can aid in keeping moisture, or lack there of, from doing further harm. Like scald for example. Chances are, you just cut a shit ton of shade away from those areas. In full sun, scald and then peeling bark. Painting the wound seems to help. If I were in a more moist climate, say where there is sudden oak death or other pathogens, I would not use it. Might trap too much moisture in promoting fungus etc..
Also, I only paint where the mistletoe has been removed more surgically through carving it out well into the cambium. Any root structure left from the mistletoe does not seem to like the petroleum product. Possibly starves it of oxygen and light as well. IMO it helps in these special conditions in these infestations. Better than a complete amputation of an entire leader or limb.
Also note, no targets.
 

DMc

TreeHouser
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Jun 2, 2008
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Montana
Lac Balsam sucks as a wound dressing, it works fine for grafting. It forms a cap just like the old heavy tar based, brush on dressings that were used. The best thing to use is just what Stephen used, a light spray on dressing that is absorbed by the wood.

Though mostly cosmetic, they have been shown to block the wound based pheromones and that will reduce the attraction of unwanted pests, many of which vector disease.
 

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
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Spot on about the pests. Most of my pine pruning takes place in cold weather. However, if we have no choice but to prune in warm, with pines, you do not want the pheromones rampant on the live tissue cuts. Dinner bell for those pests.
 

lxskllr

Treehouser
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Getting off topic, but that seems counterproductive from an evolutionary standpoint. I wonder what the *pheromones are used for?

*I don't think this is technically the right term. I believe pheromones are exclusive to animals, but I'm aware of trees having similar properties.

edit:
Wikipedia says pheromones apply to plants also. Still doesn't fully explain why though. It could be a warning to other trees, or a ramping up of it's own protections, but if bugs clue into it, it'll draw negative attention. It obviously works, cause there's trees out there, but the whole cycle/strategy would be interesting to know. I'm sure some of it is in the books I have, but never make the time to read. I really should make the time...
 
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DMc

TreeHouser
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Montana
Think of it as a bleeding wound while in shark infested waters. The wounding of a tree 'leaks' many volatile compounds. Pheromone release happens because a wound initiates a flurry of bio activity to start the sealing process. Like sharks, pests have evolved to take notice and recognize when a tree is under stress.
 
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