tree id

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
22,238
Location
Denmark
Hey, us Europeans got to stick together here.
Remind the yanks that there is actually a World outside the US.

Libanon Ceder would be my guess.

Cedrus libani.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
22,238
Location
Denmark
Since a large part of me still thinks I'm living in California..................nope!
 

Bermy

Acolyte of the short bar
Joined
May 3, 2008
Messages
8,078
Location
Tasmania
'they' say, at the tips, deodar droops down, libani is level...or is it the other way around?
All I know I have some nice deodar blanks I'd love to turn one day
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
22,238
Location
Denmark
Ship me one and tell me what you want from it.
Worked okay last time, :D



Don't Fi, shipping price will kill it.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
22,238
Location
Denmark
we are part of a bigger city called Spain, we are the tail of Europe, the end of the world.
Sounds epic?lol

With some interesting species, both avian and trees.

I'm thinking about Azure winged magpie and of course the Arbutus arbutus tree.

The Californian brother of that one is called Arbutus menziesii........................... Madrone.

Imagine my surprise when I found out what the Portuguese liquor distilled from the berries of that tree is called.

Tasted it when I went birding in Portugal 30 years ago.
Saw an Otis tetrax the same day.:)
 

Marc-Antoine

TreeHouser
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
2,730
Location
France
The C. deodora, or deodar, called himalayan here, the wood has almost no particular smell, it keeps its crown conical, and have the longest needles (2").
The most common here in lanscape "recently", seems the C. atlantica, or atlas cedar, often used because some lignages have a blue tone. It has the shortest needles (1"), the wood smells good but not too much.
The wood of C. libani has a strong smell, the needles are intermediate. It has the most horizontal look in the crown. But it's often hard to tell because the crown's shapes change quite a bit from the youth to the adult and oldest ones.
In the pic, I can tell that it isn't the deodora, but I can only guess which of the two others. It looks like a limb from the shadow (longer needles and sparser). The color puts it closer to the atlantica, but it doesn't seems really healthy though, so ?. The cone's shape can make it a libani, but I am not sure.
 

Naturarbo

Naturarbo
Joined
Feb 17, 2019
Messages
265
Location
Algarve,Portugal,Europe
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #24
The C. deodora, or deodar, called himalayan here, the wood has almost no particular smell, it keeps its crown conical, and have the longest needles (2").
The most common here in lanscape "recently", seems the C. atlantica, or atlas cedar, often used because some lignages have a blue tone. It has the shortest needles (1"), the wood smells good but not too much.
The wood of C. libani has a strong smell, the needles are intermediate. It has the most horizontal look in the crown. But it's often hard to tell because the crown's shapes change quite a bit from the youth to the adult and oldest ones.
In the pic, I can tell that it isn't the deodora, but I can only guess which of the two others. It looks like a limb from the shadow (longer needles and sparser). The color puts it closer to the atlantica, but it doesn't seems really healthy though, so ?. The cone's shape can make it a libani, but I am not sure.
Conical was the shape for sure, the tree didn't get any light from 1 angle, so was pullinh all the stucture to 1 side
 
Top