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The Tree ID Thread

Grnjp

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Looks like oriental bittersweet painin the backside to get rid of. Sends out runners and spreads that way as well as the billions of seeds the birds eat. Cut it down and paint the stumps with round up.
I peeled a small section and was drying it on top of the stove to possibly make a file handle. After heating it smelled vaguely sweet, and kind of like vanilla. I have the feeling it's some kind of invasive honeysuckle due to the prolific spread, but I haven't been able to find it online so far. When it flowers, I'll try to get a good pic of that, and it might tell what it is.
 

lxskllr

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This definitely isn't bittersweet. I'm *very* familiar with that trash, and have a little on my property, but I've been doing ok keeping it under control. This thing is very bush-like, but isn't bushy. It sends out long leaders with a few offshoots, though some of that is probably due to growing close to other plants when birds pooped out the seeds.
 

lxskllr

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What kind of small tree in the mid Atlantic gets pseudo thorns? They aren't true thorns, but abbreviated branch stubs. The tree can be fairly stout, but tends to be short and brushy, and it gets some kind of fruit on it in the fall. I don't believe it's autumn olive looking at pics online, and it definitely isn't honey locust. Infuriating to cut because the branches all knit together, and are hard to pull apart. I saw one last week, but didn't think to grab a picture.

edit:
You'd tend to find them in fields and wastelands. Probably some of the first trees after ERC that popup in an unused field.
 

Marc-Antoine

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Howthorn does that I believe, small red berries with a big pit/stone. Blackthorn too, dark violine berries, like a small olive.
Pyracantha for an other.
 
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lxskllr

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Looks like it could be a hawthorn. Hopefully I'll see one with flowers this year to pin it down.
 

lxskllr

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Saw one today. I'm gonna go with common hawthorn, crataegus monogyna. Thanks Marc!

20210330_144338.jpg

edit:
I take that back. I was fixated on the flowers, but the leaves aren't right. Common hawthorn has lobed leaves. Feels like I'm on the right path though. Gonna hit up wikipedia.
 
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Nutball

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I removed a tree today that I've seen once before, but I don't know what it is. My guess is some sort of Ash.

It has dark thick bark, looks like cottonwood bark at a glance, but just under the surface color the bark is a light brown. The bark is easily crushed relative to other tree bark. The wood is a yellowish, not Osage yellow, sort of a dirty yellow. Strong odor, pleasant in my opinion. The wood is somewhat light weight and easily rots in the center.
 

lxskllr

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I don't think so. I'm unaware of the Calleries having thorns, and the wood on these is pretty stout. They'll take a lot of abuse without breaking.
 

lxskllr

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Ah, I think you've got it there. Never really noticed the thorns before. The wood's tough though. Hard to reconcile that with the tendency to self destruct. I wonder if it could be a different cultivar?
 

SeanKroll

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I removed a tree today that I've seen once before, but I don't know what it is. My guess is some sort of Ash.

It has dark thick bark, looks like cottonwood bark at a glance, but just under the surface color the bark is a light brown. The bark is easily crushed relative to other tree bark. The wood is a yellowish, not Osage yellow, sort of a dirty yellow. Strong odor, pleasant in my opinion. The wood is somewhat light weight and easily rots in the center.
Opposite branching?
 

gf beranek

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I'll hazard a guess on this one, as native species go in Tennessee, that could be a White Pine, Loblolly Pine, Pitch Pine, Short-leaf Pine or Table Mountain pine.

Best guess from west of the Rockies.
 

Nutball

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Understandable, I expected pine as a guess, but it is definitely a non sappy deciduous hardwood that's a bit on the soft side. A tree I rarely see.
 

lxskllr

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Did you see the leaves? Sassafras has pretty distinctive leaves. Kinda club shaped. The pleasant smell points towards sassafras also.
 
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