Small filing tip

lxskllr

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That's kinda neat. I wouldn't have a lot of use for it, but I can see how some people would.
 

cory

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Very cool device, I like the looks of it!

I usually file my power pruner about twice/year but I had to file again this weekend after doing the weighted-chain thing about 2 weeks ago. Happy to report it worked very well again- quick, easy, effective.
 

gf beranek

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I met the guy who invented the ChainMeister, but can't remember his name. He even sent me one, but I was grinding my chains at the time. So I never really used it.

Basically the same as using a stump vise, but without the powerhead. It works.
 

SkwerI

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People that hand file don't typically swap out chains and save the used ones to file later. If it can be filed, it gets filed then and there. Otherwise it goes in the trash.

People that swap out their chains typically have a grinder to sharpen them.
 

Marc-Antoine

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Not the trash, but it sits on the shelf waiting for the good will. Typically, a fresh chain is mounted when I'm in a hurry on the job or /and the teeth are dammaged by a stone or some steel. The light damage doesn't wait too long, but when it needs 20 to 30 file's strokes per tooth (+ those for the rackers), it can take a while to be in the right mood to handle that, like many many months.
 

Merle Nelson

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I met the guy who invented the ChainMeister, but can't remember his name. He even sent me one, but I was grinding my chains at the time. So I never really used it.

Basically the same as using a stump vise, but without the powerhead. It works.






[IMG alt="Gerald_Beranek"]https://www.treebuzz.com/forum/data/avatars/m/0/64.jpg?1396205575[/IMG]


Gerald_Beranek
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Location Ft. Bragg, Ca.






Re: Shotline Reel Jan 15

Hey, Jim, I'm drawing a blank page when I click on your link. But nonetheless count me in for one of your limited run reels

Jer






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:) Happened on your exact post while looking. Remembered he posted under the handle Tree_Machine but had forgotten his name - Jim.

He made up throw line reels which I love and always use, that Chain Meister, and a bar clamp that was similar to the stump bar clamp you pound in accept his you used screws to mount on a board or plywood etc.

Edit: Woops, sorry for the bad copy over job from a thread at TreeBuzz.
 

Merle Nelson

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If you still have that ChainMiester Jerry there are very few of those in the world. His production throw line reels numbered 300 or less. All out of production now.
 

gf beranek

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Thanks, Merle. Yeah, Jim, Tree Machine. Super nice fellow.

Last I heard he went to work for Archangel cloning champion redwoods and Sequoias. Probably volunteered his services.

Jim had some good ideas. Too bad neither come to fruition for him. I think if he would have pushed his ideas harder it could have eventually paid for him.

But it's easy say that from the sidelines.
 

Bermy

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Tree Machine sent me his old big shot, he dropped off the forums not long after. Top bloke
 

cory

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So, my everyday 201 runs like a beast, I take good care of it, keep it constantly sharp and clean and maintained. It's 2-3 years old iirc. The chain started dishing badly despite the teeth and rakers looking perfect. I was perplexed.

I had a brand new 16" 201 bar so on a whim I installed it. I didn't think it was going to help because the bar didn't seem worn, mostly all the paint was still on it and I keep it clean and flipped regularly.

Happy and surprised to say: problem solved. :rockhard: :O8)
 

cory

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I don't have a rail closer. For a small bar like that, seems sensible to just buy new.
 

lxskllr

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Or a good practice platform. Clean up the rails using a dresser, then hammer them back into shape. Use a dime as a gauge so you don't go too far.
 

treesmith

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I haven’t closed a bar in years, but every time a new chain goes on, I dress the bar on the bench grinder.
 

Nutball

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Squaring the rails is important maintenance. You'd think flipping the bar over would cause the wear to be even, but it can't be flipped end to end for completely even wear. The chain direction and cutting habits are still the same, and can wear out one side of the rails.
 

cory

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You can tap the unmounted bar with a hammer on a hard, flat surface, with a chain's drivers in the groove.
Or a good practice platform. Clean up the rails using a dresser, then hammer them back into shape. Use a dime as a gauge so you don't go too far.
I try to get ever mile out of chains , bars , .... feel kinda like I won when I wear out a bar (as opposed to bending)
I can totally appreciate these 3 posts and they're interesting but they also sound too much like the strong streak of penny wise/pound foolish in me. Aside from the learning aspect and being able to make a worn out bar work if I was stuck on a desert isle, I don't think it is worth it. Imma just install a new bar and move forward to all the other maintenance/paperwork/appts that need doing.:big-bat::barf: :rockhard:
 

SeanKroll

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I hear that.

It's really pretty quick, but other things are more pressing.

I'm happy to have enough oil and grease in and on things, plus sharp chains.
 

lxskllr

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Depends on what you want to spend time on I guess. I don't mind fooling with bars, and don't really consider it work. I'm less inclined to mess with chainsaw mechanics. I have little doubt I /could/ do it, I just don't want to. My 026 is still in the garage wanting rings(I think). Should be fairly straightforward, but I can't bring myself to do it without a pressing need.
 

Treeaddict

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Depends on what you want to spend time on I guess. I don't mind fooling with bars, and don't really consider it work. I'm less inclined to mess with chainsaw mechanics. I have little doubt I /could/ do it, I just don't want to. My 026 is still in the garage wanting rings(I think). Should be fairly straightforward, but I can't bring myself to do it without a pressing need.
I’m the same way. Bars and chains are interesting maintenance but digging into power head functions makes me wince.
 

Trains

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I’m the same way. Bars and chains are interesting maintenance but digging into power head functions makes me wince.
Thats why you have friends who have done this before once or twice :), to help with the process, its really not that hard, and some investment into some basic tools like a 3/8 tension wrench and long 1/4" t27 and you can tackle most saws.

and yes bars are worth keeping straight and dressed, sprockets lubed etc.

Straightened up this one that was bent and had a twist, then closed and dressed the rails.

barstraightening2.jpg dressingbarlength.jpg
 
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