Small filing tip

cory

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Is it cutting well now?
 

Magnus

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Usually on laminated bars it is not worth the time, but solid or more expensive bars is often worth having a look at. Usually bar rails are short enough as it is...
Closing rail often show it is too wide in bottom and chain(s) are worn on drivers side. Then tie straps alone is what hold it steady and for hose not running low riders or hooked tooth this works ok but for some it makes excessive wear on chain.
 

cory

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Makes sense.
 

TINYHULK

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Help a green guy out. What would be the give away for whether it’s a laminated bar or not? I know most light bars are laminated but what is the giveaway for other bars? Also I have the hand held bar rail conditioner and I feel like it doesn’t file the bar down evenly on both sides. Is there a technique that I’m missing or is that something that just needs the big electric rail conditioner?
 

lxskllr

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Removable tip is solid, most(all?) others are laminated. That's excluding hardnose bars which I believe will all be solid. Good light bars will be solid, but will have pockets milled out and filled to shave weight. Again, removable tips.

I use the hand file thing for the bars, and it seems to work well. Pay attention to geometry and steady pressure while using it.
 

Nutball

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Help a green guy out. What would be the give away for whether it’s a laminated bar or not? I know most light bars are laminated but what is the giveaway for other bars? Also I have the hand held bar rail conditioner and I feel like it doesn’t file the bar down evenly on both sides. Is there a technique that I’m missing or is that something that just needs the big electric rail conditioner?
No replaceable tip on laminated, laminated usually have signs of rivets. Looking at the tail of the bar you will see 3 layers. Many light bars are solid other than light weight inserts, but Stihl has some little laminated light bars, and Oregon has some medium size light bars that are glued together laminations or some scrap design like that.
 

Magnus

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Laminated bars that are spot welded is easy to see. Not as easy with glued but a look in end of bar often show what it is.
Replaceable tip is a good way to see although there are and have been laminated bars with replaceable tip.
Weight is a good sign to tell too.

Many is worried about weight. And so much focus is given to it that the bars are often up to 100g lighter.
If you then look at saw it is often easy to take 150g off in dirt and crap...

Bar rails thickness is another thing often ignored. There is a reason solid bars last longer and thicker rails is one thing.
There are laminated bars that are as thin as tiestrap or even less on rare occasions. These often wear down fast and are not very sturdy.
If they are glued they often seperate if used a bit more.
 

Al Smith

Mac Daddy
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I don't think I've ever bowed a bar but I have repaired several . Those were bars from my buddy's tree service they must have used for pry bars .I was still working at that time and used a hydraulic arbor press at work .He only buys Stihl stuff and most of my Stihl chains came from him .I repair those too but I have bought a few myself .Good chain although a tad more money but it lasts a lot longer .
 

Magnus

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I have bent some bars over the years. Mostly after felling. Pinched even more, shot many sprockets until I quit greasing...
Stuff happen.
Fixing bars is fun and often it saves a buck or two if it gets right. If not it is time wasted you could be making money on.
Running bad bars can be costly in repairs and even dangerous.
 
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