The Tree House loves TreeStuff!

And now I wait

SeanKroll

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 13, 2016
Messages
7,751
Location
Olympia, WA
If you have room, sticker-stacking with weight on top, or ratchet straps, etc, will reduce movement while drying.
 

SeanKroll

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 13, 2016
Messages
7,751
Location
Olympia, WA
You may want more blocks and stickers, vertically aligned, possibly moved to the very, very ends. Paint ends. Stickers and some stable, dry wood on top (2x's/ dry board/ plywood strip), then weight.

You're looking for ripples, I think with those offset stickers.
 

rfwoody

Treehouser
Joined
Jun 1, 2017
Messages
800
Location
North Mississippi
milled_white_oak_stacks_20190109_092830_resized.jpg

Here are some boards I milled with ms660 and 24" Granberg mill and have been sitting out like this for 3 years or so.
This thread and all these pictures and comments are motivating to do more and finally do something with these boards.
-- but you can see the severe checking in the ends.... not grade "A" material, but one could make some nice things from them.
 

SeanKroll

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 13, 2016
Messages
7,751
Location
Olympia, WA
Mis-tint paint is $12/ gallon at Home Depot.

I'd aim for more weight, as possibly, all stickers aligned. Seems to me that tacking the stickers to a vertical board with an little air-nailer would be a easy way to keep them lined up. I fight this battle, especially when I have 'help'...people often like to rush to finish, too often. Not, breathe, think, and work efficiently.


I'm thinking of putting down a straight board or set of 4x4s on the bottom my stack as well. Slow down the moisture loss on the bottom of the bottom board. Dunno is that's important. Haven't heard of people doing it.
 

Patrick A

Treehouser
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
191
Location
Danbury CT
Call me insane but I rotate the stack every month. It is due next week. I will align the stickers then. I will apply paint within the next few days. I think the wait time and all the thinking is part of the fun. Beats watching Netflix.
 

Patrick A

Treehouser
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
191
Location
Danbury CT
What Raj said and I like sticks that are at least 1" wide so placing them is a no brainer. I once had sticks that were close to being square in cross section and it was a pain to place them.
 

Stumpshot

General Purpose
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
1,495
Location
Kansas City
We just got a load of some nice white oak from the recent Lake of the Ozarks job. That and the beautiful Black Logs Matter material... Now just need time to crank up the Timber King and saw it all up!
 

Raj

TreeHouser
Joined
Oct 26, 2013
Messages
7,184
Location
Brantford, Ontario
Bought a stack of second hand foam insulation, insulated the kiln. -8C wind chill down to -18C last night, the kiln kept 14C with dehumidifier, circulating fan and halogen light on. Got 4L of water over night.

I have a layer of foam separating the top half. It's easy removable, 2ft by 4ft boards.

20190110_091534.jpg
 

Raj

TreeHouser
Joined
Oct 26, 2013
Messages
7,184
Location
Brantford, Ontario
Trailer, just because it was free. And I'll move it a couple times. Inside is just under 4ft wide 10.5ft long and 6ft high. Windows are just held in by expanding foam. I hope to make a larger, angled, window panel to collect more sunsine.
Also add a larger angled roof that can cover some airdry on the back side.

20181228_123105.jpg
 

Marc-Antoine

TreeHouser
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
1,817
Location
France
I saw somewhere that they use a rectangular stick to have 2 useful thickness, either to speed up or slow down the drying.
 

rfwoody

Treehouser
Joined
Jun 1, 2017
Messages
800
Location
North Mississippi
anchor_sealed_rounds_20190110_114142_resized.jpg

yeah, I have some anchor seal, but have become disillusioned in it.... it seems the rounds I paint with it ... and even ends ...(even soon after cutting) still get splits.
(need to do spring cleaning on the porch)

For stickers I bought some cheap long 1x4's (3/4 x 3 1/2), ripped them into 3 equal pieces (~1"), then cut them at 2' lengths =~ 24 x 3/4 x 1

It seems a 4x4 base (pair of 4x4's running parallel with stack) could help ensure level foundation.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
18,760
Location
Denmark
You cannot keep rounds from splitting.
The tangential and radial shrinkage causes it.

That is why one should never include the center marrow in a turned object, it will split.

The only way around that is to stabilize the cell structure with something like Polyethylenglucol.
 

rfwoody

Treehouser
Joined
Jun 1, 2017
Messages
800
Location
North Mississippi
Well that explains my futility with rounds then.

...but don't many people successfully carve/turn bowls out of rounds?

Is Polyethylenglucol like antifreeze?
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
18,760
Location
Denmark
You can turn a bowl out of a round if you make the bottom so thin that it can flex.
Then it can get rid of the shrinkage by flexing instead of by splitting.

Some wood types are less prone to split in rounds than other, like yew.

I don't know what PEG is exactly. I'm a logger, not a chemist.
 

Patrick A

Treehouser
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
191
Location
Danbury CT
Very cool setup. I see a couple chairs and cups of coffee and hours spent watching wood dry.Do you have an exhaust? If yes, is it automated or running on a timer?
 

Tree09

Treehouser
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
5,691
Location
Peoria il
You are thinking polypropylene glycol, aka food grade antifreeze. PEG is different, used in laxatives and for preserving stuff, among other things.
 

Marc-Antoine

TreeHouser
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
1,817
Location
France
I thought about the rounds splitting and I found a way, but never took the time to try it.
With a thin blade like a bandsaw, you cut the round in 2, 3 or more parts, then let it dry gently. Most of the shrinkage will occur freely, widening the cuts, but not by increasing the internal tensions (much less at least). Now, cut again at the previous cuts to eat the excess of wood in the middle, not touching the bark. Cut many times, keeping the kerf's sides parallel, until the outsides of the different parts meet again each other. Smooth the sides nicely, and glue back together the parts. The reconstituted round shouldn't move now, excepted if the ambient humidity changes drastically (don't drop it in the pool).

Is that clear or muddy?
 
The Tree House Loves TreeStuff!
Top