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Electric Chainsaw feedback

CurSedVoyce

California Hillbilly
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Jun 30, 2008
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Near Yosemite in CA USA
Keeping my eye currently on the Echo coming out. Battery version. I liked the Husky. Just really hard to justify a 1000.00 investment into a limb saw. And then the battery disposal thing bothers me. Let alone the non eco friendly process of aquiring the minerals and making of the damn things that cost 100.00 per probably every two years. Like the quiet and no pull cord though.
 

kevin bingham

TreeHouser
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Nov 10, 2010
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Standard tree work. Pruning removals. I went stihl. I have five batteries. Much easier than a tank of gas. 2 Back handles and 1 top handle. One blower. Also hedge trimmers and weedwacker. The back handle processes wood on the ground. The top handle is more like the ms 150. We have a 261 and a 441 and a 661 for our gas saws. We have the little echo top handle that rips but nobody uses it, unless the electrics are dull.

I also have a couple makita electrics that are lretty quality. We have an invertor on the truck so we can charge batteries by driving. .
 

Bermy

Acolyte of the short bar
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May 3, 2008
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Tasmania
We've got the battery Milwaukee on all our rescue vehicles...I proof tested one for the service and it worked really well. My groundie used it most of the day turning a eucalypt we removed into firewood. It handled it all no problem on one charge.

I still find the battery arborist saws too heavy and awkward for me in the tree, I wish my 150 had a battery and not weight any more than it does.
 

kevin bingham

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From what ive seen husky has the best batrery line. The stihl is less powerful. I have a stihl dealer a mile from my house though. Huskys distribution system is definitly not as widespread
 

Magnus

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May 6, 2005
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South East Sweden
Standard tree work. Pruning removals. I went stihl. I have five batteries. Much easier than a tank of gas. 2 Back handles and 1 top handle. One blower. Also hedge trimmers and weedwacker. The back handle processes wood on the ground. The top handle is more like the ms 150. We have a 261 and a 441 and a 661 for our gas saws. We have the little echo top handle that rips but nobody uses it, unless the electrics are dull.

I also have a couple makita electrics that are lretty quality. We have an invertor on the truck so we can charge batteries by driving. .
I talked to some that climb with with battery saws when the. Usually 2 batteries per tree. When they have full day's and lots to do they use gas saws.
When its a bit slower they use the electric combined with gas saws.
Only one I know that work a full day with battrey saw is a fruit tree cutter. He uses pole cutter most and pole chainsaw, hand chainsaw. His back pack battery usually last a day.
 

kevin bingham

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I have never run out of batteries on a job. 5 batterries on site for 2 saws + blower. It is much more common to unconveniently run out of fuel in the middle of the final cut on the stump.

Electrics have just replaced the smaller line up so far. I think the trick for the big saws will be to have back pack batteries.
 

DMc

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Jun 2, 2008
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Montana
... It is much more common to unconveniently run out of fuel in the middle of the final cut on the stump...
If that happens more than once in a blue moon, you need to maybe pay more attention to that detail.

I think electric power is great, but the simplicity and efficiency of a small two stroke saw is tough to beat.
 

kevin bingham

TreeHouser
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Nov 10, 2010
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Yep, same with batteries. Running out of fuel of whatever sort is on you. Swapping a battery is faster and less messy than refueling too. I wish they were lighter, but they will be soon enough.

I dont usually do much complicated climbing with a chainsaw. Im faster up to four inches with a sharp zubat.




 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
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Aug 26, 2007
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Denmark
Maybe I should just trade my 500i in for a batteri model, keep the forest quiet.
 

Tree09

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Peoria il
I'm talking in the tree for something you would use a top handle for. Only thing i would consider them for until they get way more powerful. Maybe a groundie saw for breaking brush down.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
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Yep, but Kevin was going on like they could replace gas powered saws for anything.
Won't be in my lifetime that they will have any place in logging, I fear.

I'd love to be proven wrong.
 

Frankie

I Build and Run Ported Saws !
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
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Location
Buffalo NY
Electric saws have there place ... I don’t see them replacing a stock let alone ported 70cc + class anytime soon ... any questions ask the guy from Denmark 🇩🇰 Stig-nor-am-us :lol:
 

Nutball

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Apr 4, 2015
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Mt. Juliet, TN
Yep, but Kevin was going on like they could replace gas powered saws for anything.
Won't be in my lifetime that they will have any place in logging, I fear.

I'd love to be proven wrong.
How much gas do you use in a day and carry around the woods?

Less power head weight and being much quieter is very tempting (but I hate the high pitch chain and sprocket noises which can still be quite loud). You could certainly have plenty of instant torque for long bars, but there's still the issue of carrying your gas can (batteries) on you back, and it doesn't get lighter as the electrons flow out. And you'd need a few of those giant batteries. Carrying one around wouldn't be so bad, but having to swap out every 20min of actual cutting would become impractical. Just think, a normal battery saw probably has 1hp, and 1 battery. A big 7hp saw will need 7 of those battery packs (or equiv size single pack) at any one time.
 

Benjo75

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Nov 8, 2016
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Malvern, Arkansas
A little over a year ago I gave in and bought the top handle husky and 4 batteries. I wanted to run it for a while before giving much advice on it. I have only started a gas top handle once since buying the electric. That was when I forgot all but one battery at home. It won't hang with a 200t. More in line with the 150 power wise.

The best thing for me is not having to breathe exhaust all day anymore. Being quiter is nice. No vibration made a bigger difference than I thought. You can make a cut and sit it down on a limb or the bucket or a roof and it won't vibrate away. Not having to pull start 800 times a day is nice. Especially when in a precarious position out on the end of a limb. One battery is about equivalent to a tank of gas.

No more worrying about carbs, fuel lines, fuel filters, air filters, the savings in fuel which is minimal but it does add up. Keep it sharp and it cuts just fine. If it gets the least bit dull it won't cut near as good and you'll go through batteries faster.

As far as longevity of the saw itself and battery life, I'm almost a year and a half in and absolutely no problems or complaints at all. The chain tensioner could be better. Typical husky tensioner. Kinda finicky but you get used to it. I don't see the electrics replacing my bigger saws anytime soon. I do have to swap to the 261 a little sooner than I would have with the 200. But not enough to really make a difference. My wrists and elbows have completely quit hurting. After a few years of them bothering me I thought that was just the way it was going to be from here on. I contribute that to the saw being lighter and no vibration.

I would buy it again today if I didn't have it. Plus I'm looking into the pole saw and blower since I already have the batteries. My dad has the stihl rear handle. It can't hang with he husky top handle but it's still nice to have on the ground to pick up and cut a few limbs and keep the area around the tree clean.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
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Denmark
We use the Stihl rear handle as a designated chipper saw.
Just for that pesky branch or union that won't go in the chipper chute.
It shines for that, because you can just pick it up and run it, no time wasted by starting it.
 

kevin bingham

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Nov 10, 2010
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Wait, so you guys aren't needing to recharge/swap for a whole day? Even on removals?
Batteries last a little longer than a tank of gas. Maybe= 2 tanks. Keeping batteries on hand is wise. Charge them via trucks as you drive. It is faster to swap a batterry than to refuel. One problem is its easy to forget to put the oil in. Definitly no electrics for logging yet. Just the smaller line.
 

Tree09

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Feb 28, 2017
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Peoria il
Yup, I'll be getting a makita one this summer then (i love dolmar, that's all i run atm). Next question, i was thinking 16" bar, which their 18v x 2 can come with. Should i go with a smaller bar? Or is 16 ok?
 

Magnus

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May 6, 2005
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South East Sweden
Battery saws are not quiet the noice from engine is different, and cutting system the same.
If you look at the sounds and what damages they make its rarely the large db sounds that damage.

I have never run out of fuel on a job... But I have run out of batteries...
 
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