milling thread

Raj

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Nice! I have the same problem, a lot of people asking for wood, I do have, but not dry yet. I cut some hackberry a few months ago, a thinner slab, it's.down to 20% air dried. Taking it to Brantford tomorrow to throw in the kiln.
 

lxskllr

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Granberg sells quick clips for mill height adjustment...


I'm thinking about getting a set. That would eliminate one of the more annoying aspects of running the mill.
 

SeanKroll

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Do you have a/ the Granberg winch?
I'd put the money towards that, from what I've heard. I haven't milled since buying one.

A used boat winch is sometimes on hand or cheap.
 

lxskllr

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I don't have a winch, and I don't think I mill enough to warrant buying one. Shoving the saw through the wood is most enjoyable part of the process for me. What I really hate is the setup, and that quick clip will help that a bit. It'll especially make sharpening easier. On the lower settings, I can file one side ok, but I have to file the other side on a pull stroke from same position as the "easy" teeth. To do it right, I'd have to loosen the mill, and raise it up a bunch, and that's fiddly and annoying, especially for something like sharpening, which has to be done frequently. Having a quick clip would make mill height changes almost effortless.
 

Treeaddict

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It doesn’t seem like many adjustments are made when milling. Usually just the top cut adjustment and then another adjustment to set your slab width. I’ve disliked how I can’t adjust chain tension and oil port requires a squirt bottle to fill.

What is winch on eBay and was going to modify the cranking end. Was going to use it to manipulate logs. Ended up attaching it to the mill. A must for large (30”+) logs on flat ground. Not so bad when you are able to get some thing like a 10° pitch though
 

SeanKroll

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I have 18'6" logs that I want to mill into big beams.

How would you set-up for creating a first, flattening cut for that length?

Any tricks for squaring the mill for edging, short of an edger?
 

lxskllr

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A long ladder anchored to the top. take the top off. Optionally, drop the mill, and take the bottom off. Roll the log 90°, anchor the ladder again, checking with a framing square, repeat step #1. All assuming an Alaskan mill. Dunno about other mills.

edit:
If your ladder, frame, whatever isn't long enough to span the log, screw down boards to rest your frame on. Shim as necessary so they're all the same height. Clamp your frame to those and start milling. When you run out of frame, unclamp it, slide it down, reclamp, and continue milling.
 
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stikine

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I have 18'6" logs that I want to mill into big beams.

How would you set-up for creating a first, flattening cut for that length?

Any tricks for squaring the mill for edging, short of an edger?
See my post #1,411 (if you are chainsaw milling). That particular guide system can be shuffled like John describes above. It is handy to have a small laser level to extend your marks if the guide doesn't cover the whole length of the log. This is kind of the concept but it doesn't show the leap frog method with laser, I can't seem to find it atm.


Edging is kind of a pain but you can clamp the live edge slabs together vertically with pipe clamps and follow the same flattening process as above. I usually flatten three sides of the log and then just cut square dimensional lumber so I don't have to mess with clamping the slabs.
 

greengreer

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KIMG0630.JPG

Found this old mill off in the weeds at local timber frame company. Spun a bearing in the pillow block and ruined one of the band wheel shafts, so they parked it.
A little TLC and it's running great. Red oak log in the pic got turned into new decking for the equipment trailer.
 

greengreer

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I'm curious as to when you guys are running blade lube and what your using? I've heard bar oil, diesel, water, etc etc but have only tried water so far. The softwoods and green hardwoods dont seem to need anything but I've had the blades gum up a bit in drier hardwood.
 

Dave Shepard

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I've run nothing for years. I do have some gumming, but not bad. If I sawed a lot of syp, I'd definitely need to run something. I have the check valves to fix my lube system, and I'll run windshield washer fluid. Some swear by diesel, but I don't need it, and won't use it.
 

Patrick A

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I've run nothing for years. I do have some gumming, but not bad. If I sawed a lot of syp, I'd definitely need to run something. I have the check valves to fix my lube system, and I'll run windshield washer fluid. Some swear by diesel, but I don't need it, and won't use it.
Water most of the time for the past 2 years.
 

SeanKroll

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Some use dilute pinesol or dish washing soap ( oris it detergent) for some milling.

My miller cuts cedar without lube.
Idk what else.
 
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