Welders? Any welders on this site?

pigwot

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Auction is over; inoperables/needing repair went for around $200; most of the others went for about $625 to $650 if they were bare machines and didn't have any extras. Those with extras were closer to $1000+
I didn't get one, as I don't really have the room or need, as both tree companies I work for have really nice welders, and I can pull into their shops anytime they aren't busy.
 

Bart

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What's the consensus on old heavy iron vs new fangled computer controlled electronic units? You have to admit they build in knowledge of welding processes to the electronic machines. But old transformers basically never die. ?

ps sorry about the earlier derail
 

Tree09

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The synchrowaves (and the dial arcs) are tig welders, mainly for aluminum or other alloy type stuff. They were the miller top of the line machines for that type of work, and will stick weld very well too. They were production able tig machines, and usually have advanced for the time arc controls. The arc percent is really handy if you get into trying to repair aluminum stuff, but that's such a rarity for me that simply knowing a couple of buddies with them is enough for me. For the right price tho they would be a phenomenal score for a machine if you got the room and power to run one. It'll stick and tig weld pretty much anything metallic in the galaxy, gouge, and serve as a mighty fine end table in the shop :lol:


@Bart I'm a huge fan of older iron. They don't build in welding knowledge, they've been trying to replicate the drooping arc curves of the old school dc generators and they very recently have achieved what i would consider parity on the very top level machines that go around 15 k plus. The inverters have their place for sure, in construction you often move machines around everywhere, so the ability to hump them up stairs and stuff to do repairs or to different jobsites is huge. On bigger jobs you can have literally thousands of people, so they are even sold in 6 packs so you can have 12 machines on a cart, a nice and compact option. With transformer machines this has a huge footprint, with a ton more power, lead, and cable needed. Factories and jobsites can use much less electricity since the inverters are far more efficient, sometimes the power companies will even try to force the issue over this. I ran some of the larger transformer ones in the area here back when i started, 1000 amp machines running .052 and 3/32 dualshield, which was being switched to a robot weld during my time there.

I've got tons of posts in this thread and others about this exact thing too, it just depends on what you're doing and trying to accomplish. If you aren't needing the very specific attributes of an inverter i have a hard time accepting a higher price point for a more delicate machine that usually has an inferior arc. If you are setting up a production setup with trigger selectable programs on a high duty cycle, by all means. The miller xmt series is ubiquitous and will weld pretty damn well, and of course the pipeworx and similar multiprocesses welders are amazing. Lincolns offerings are likely better, most contractors i work for usually run miller likely due to cost so i run mainly millers at work. I run my Lincoln 72 sa200 on my truck when I'm welding pipeline, and it's the most amazing arc I've ever run. The cross country engine drive is equivalent to a dc generator, the arc is different but they are very well behaved and consistent, while the generators drift a bit as they heat up and cool off. Obviously the engines are 50 years apart in technology so score ease of that to the new ones too. But I bought mine for 500 bucks from a junkyard while bar hopping and shopping for a "let's get drunk and build a pontoon boat" weekend, which you just can't quite replicate with a computer :lol:
 

Tree09

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All sa200 have both a serial number and a code number, the code number is exactly what iteration it is. The copper wound ones have the round generator housing while the al ones have an octagon housing to house the larger al wires. Lots of guys have switched the al ones over to copper, but you can't tell that without getting inside it, so a good rule of thumb is look up the code and check the housing.
 

Ryan

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20220904_132243.jpg
My nephew built this cart for my woodsplitter. He's not completely satisfied with it but I don't think anyone who builds things from scratch is. "I should have done this or I should have done that." I'm happy with it. The wheels are from an old compressor.
 

Bart

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Better than the way those splitters come, for sure. Warning - avoid disassembly and servicing of the cylinder assembly! The one my friend opened actually had silicone goop seals on the end plates and some sort of gotcha made reassembly near impossible. It was during trying to replace the plastic bushing on the slide head.

On topic, I think my mig ramps the wire feed and I can't tell if it messes with the voltage, short of throwing a scope on it. Or maybe not ramp but slow/full progression based on hearing the feed motor.
 

Tree09

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What's it doing? If your mig isn't acting right you usually have to replace something, so inspect your tip and then the rollers. Blow out the liner, and if it's hanging up replace it. Often dust will settle on the wire if it's exposed, or rust will happen and all that gets hung up on the consumables. Also the wire will slowly eat it away, so when you're welding hard you'll be replacing tips a few times a day. The tips get worn and the hole that guides the wire gets wallowed out and with the inevitable twist your wire will be going in circles, making it very hard to do anything right.
 

Bart

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It's not a malfunction, it's done it since new. My guess is controlling the start of the weld pool or some such. Haven't paid enough attention yet to see how it varies across wire feed setting but it's easy to spot (hear-the whirring of the gears) at the higher settings. Maybe it's controlling misfeeds caused by an instant high speed startup.

aha google seek and ye shall find! :
"If your machine is a modern inverter, it may have a "creep start", where the wire will not move at the set speed until an arc is established. If it is new for you, this behaviour may take some getting used to."

google produceth:
"It’s called “run in mode”. Not in the manual. I found it in the interface and Googled it for a definition. The slow time varies for different wire types; default is 50% (of what I don’t know). The machine kicks up to normal speed when the arc starts."
 
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Tree09

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Baby mig, do do do do........ lol glad you got it figured out. The xmts have an option where you can program the start and finish as what you need it to do (on each individual program), where you can manually set the time for the purge, volts, and wire feed so it does it automatically when you start or stop on that program. Very handy for post purging too, especially on stainless.
 

BlackSmith

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Good on aluminum too Kyle when you need a hot start then mellow out.

You guys running a mig, ask your local welding supply if they can get “dipped” tips. They’re just regular tips but have been dipped in liquid nitrogen. Harder than non dipped and last 3 to 4 times longer.
 

flushcut

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
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Is there a cost difference? I don’t burn thru that many tips as is maybe ten-fifteen a year. Bernard center fire on a Q-gun.
 

Tree09

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I used to even go so far as hammering them around the wire to keep one going a bit longer, but i never knew about the dipped tips, thx Bob. I'll do that for my stick welding stingers too once they no longer hold a 3/32, just take the insulator parts off, put a rod in the messed up slot, then hammer it flat around the rod. Works pretty well and can get way more life out of one.
 

Bart

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Does babymigist mean I have more than one kid? ;)

Apparently a lot of machines have the speed/arc sensing feature. No mention of it at all in my manual. With batteries obviously my machine is inverter based. 'Fangled gizmo!

If you read reviews the 'fangled machines have profiles, hot start, pulsing etc etc on it goes. Some guy I read about bought a $5k machine and was happy as a pig in clover with his improved results. Few years back. Tig I think.
 

Bart

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I'm well aware. ok, how's about a gauntlet. weld stainless/titanium alloy chimney liner without blowing through it. 3, 2, 1 go ...

I actually considered this. odds are low. It's my cheap duct pipe vs the gold-lined urethane stuff for my leaf sucker.
 

Tree09

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I would do it just like they do for stoves, weld a small ring that they then shoot self tappers into or use a hose clamp to keep it in place. Having said that I've tig welded stainless stuff that thin, never really messed with titanium since they don't build pipes with it, or at least that I've had to work on yet.

There's many different kinds of welding, and if you are looking to do light weight non structural stuff a small mig machine is the perfect machine. But when you get into repairing your trailer or equipment, building rigging gear, or anything else that really can't come apart mig has to be run hot as hell to ensure penetration. This isn't my opinion, in fact mig is not even allowed in structural codes unless you are in spray settings or running dualshield at certain parameters. On structural and heavier stuff you have to have enough heat to tear into the base metal, ensuring that everything is joined properly.

Mig is of course by far the most common process in production, in a controlled breeze free shop on clean steel in the flat or horizontal. My first welding job was welding rops for combines, where all the structural welds had to be done on pulse forcing a spray arc no matter what. This is why stick welding is still used all day everyday on construction sites all over the world, it's about the only process where you can go and work rusty metal to xray quality with a torch, hammer, hand brush, and a file. We break apprentices in here by going no grinder for a stretch doing multi pass pipe welds, which forces them to learn how to burn out impurities so they can do stuff where you can't get a grinder into. Stick welding done at hot enough settings actually digs out impurities which are removed with the flux, and can easily keep up with mig for speed amp vs amp until you are fully into spray arc settings with larger wires. So for most people here stick welding is going to be the better process for the majority of stuff they will need to do.
 

cory

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Alrighty then, this aint a welding Q but it is a metal/metalurgical Q and I figured this is the thread for it to attract the right eyeballs :rockhard:

I have a metal choke collar for a dog, the kind with the spikes on it. It has the basic chrome finish on it for a metal dog collar. but it hasn't been used in a while and is now a bit rusty. The rust hinders the back and forth smooth sliding of the collar to constrict and then slacken. Btw, I find the spikes to be extremely effective to stop all pulling on leash while causing basically zero pain.

So how can I get the rust off the collar so it works smoothly like new? I'm sure if I dunked it in oil or WD 40 the problem would be solved but oil residue would likely be on there for ages thus making a mess on the fur etc.

Anyone have a slicker :/:;) idea?
 

lxskllr

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How /I/ would try to do it with the hillbilly tools I have around here is put in a coffee can with sand and small rocks, and shake, shake, shake... Might take a week or more of doing it when you feel like it. Everything will be dry, so it can still be used on the dog. When(if?) the scale is gone from the steel, I'd cook it in something like canola oil. Clean using paper towels first, then maybe back in the sand can for final cleaning. Shake, shake, shake.

I have no idea if this would work, but it's what comes to mind using what I have around here. A rock tumbler would be ideal for initial cleanup. The oil bath is speculative, but I think it should work with proper care afterward. eg, don't hang it on the fence when done.
 
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