Woodworking

Fiddler

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I was looking around for a wood project thread to post this in and didn't find one. So thought I'd start this.

Wanted to show this chair to Jay, as he is quite a furniture artist himself.

<div id="fb-root"></div><script>(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script><div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/BarkAndCherry/photos/a.558313784221530.1073741828.558308897555352/924574990928739/?type=1" data-width="500"><div class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"><blockquote cite="https://www.facebook.com/BarkAndCherry/photos/a.558313784221530.1073741828.558308897555352/924574990928739/?type=1"><p>From Kevin D: "Here's a picture of the Maserati Rocker that I made. I sculpted this chair out of bubinga, leopardwood, maple and ebony."</p>Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BarkAndCherry">Daily Craftsman</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BarkAndCherry/photos/a.558313784221530.1073741828.558308897555352/924574990928739/?type=1">Saturday, April 11, 2015</a></blockquote></div></div>
 

Fiddler

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embedding didn't seem to work...sorry.

If you click on the Date link it will bring you to the picture...
 

Fiddler

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thanks Jim! Don't have the slightest why it didn't work for me...usually always does.:dontknow:

with that much glue I'd say it's pretty sturdy...just not too sure about the little "crack aligner" in the seat.:O
 

pigwot

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I saw that in another woodworking forum... a bit wild for my taste, but what workmanship!

Met with a friend this morning who will bring his crew in to do the foundation (ICF) for my new wood shop and an addition to the house.
This afternoon an excavator comes by to look at the job. I took two trees down for him at his riverfront home (crane job) and didn't charge him, so we could swap for the earth moving... can't wait to have a shop again.
 

FireFighterZero

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I saw that. Just dont swivel in your seat! That is a beauty of a chair, I hope Jay sees it. I would love to hear his take.

I like a laminate look. Gun stocks look good laminated, and are supposed to be much more stable than straight walnut.

Ibanez and Peavy used to make neck-through basses. Those are pretty too. I guess you can still order one from Carvin.
 

FireFighterZero

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Whats the story with that one Peter? Looks gooooooooooood!

I gigged around the state with a dude that had a Peavy Cirrus 5 string. It was not shiny but it played nice. Neck through.

My go to right now is a G&L but no neck through sadly. I wish I had bought that Tobias 6 string long ago...........ARGGGHHH!
 

Fiddler

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stig

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I remember that one.
A couple of Austrian guys, I believe.
Made a faceplate to fit the tractor, which is hydraulic, so the could set the RPMs to fit the job.
They cheated though, and glued the blank up so it was already bowl shaped.

Stuart Mortimer went the hard way, when he did this one:

http://blankity-blanks.com/AWWorldsLargestBowl.pdf
 

Fiddler

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Cool article! Lathe from England, wood form WA, and done in Novi, MI. Quite a project!
 

Fiddler

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Raj

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Bump this thread. A little Christmas project for the GF. An oak screen door. Mortise and tenons. Not sure of the bottom panel. May be I'll spruce it up. May be not. I had some 1 1/2 rough oak laying around for over 10 years. Traded it for some work from some guy who had a saw mill and he cut the boards too thick and couldn't find anyone who wanted it. $50 of work for a truck load if I remember right. Planed it down. I think I'll have some sanding to do tomorrow. Long pipe clamps made good winding sticks.

20161220_152010.jpg
 

Raj

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Just a simple door. Wish I had enough plywood to change the grain the other way on the bottom panel. First sanding done. Hope she appreciates the time I put into it.

20161221_150728.jpg
 

woodworkingboy

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Looks good, Peter, it's going to be a nice door. The grain looks ok in that direction. It's a pretty common approach to have wood grain running in the direction of the maximum dimension, but sometimes with long things like your door, the grain running opposite can make for comfortable to your eye in the overall balance, instead of everything being so long and linear and appearing accentuated visually elongated.

Just a tip, one thing that you can do on the horizontal rails, is instead of having them the same thickness as the stiles, step them back an with eighth inch or a little less and slightly round over the face edges of the stiles on the insides where the wood meets. The little break where the different wood directions contacts looks cool with an attended to edge there, gives some relief to all the flatness and can add a little refined look and point of interest. You can sand finish everything before assembling. It also eliminates the possibility of wood movement disrupting the nice flat face at the joint that you have gone to the effort to sand to produce. Obviously you can't thin down the rails if you don't have enough wood remaining to give sufficient strength after putting in the panel grooves. Sometimes I do that relief on cabinet doors on the outside where they will be seen. The inside isn't necessary and leaves the full thickness to work with. It's another approach.
 
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