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Why do people put concrete in trees and what good does it do?

Benjo75

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Ran in to another stump today that was pumped full of concrete. Luckily I saw it in time and didn't ruin a chain. I used the word pumped because it was almost 3 ft up in this hollow tree and the only access I could find was at the ground. I took this tree down and I swear there wasn't a hole anywhere too be found. Except for the one at the ground. But the concrete was over 2 ft higher than that hole.

I cut a Red Oak about 5 years ago. 4 ft dia. Someone had poured the hollow full from a hole that was right at 30 ft up. The entire tree was full up to this point. But there was an obvious hole in that one. Ruined a few chains getting it on the ground. Then ruined a few more trying to cut through a 8 inch cylinder of concrete every 8 ft all the way to 30 ft. Every cut I made I knew the concrete couldn't go any higher but it kept going.

Am I missing something? Does this do any good for the tree? They don't seem to be really growing over the concrete except maybe a little on the outside right at the bottom. Is it just something old men do to feel like they're saving the tree and making it stronger? It sure causes me lots of grief.
 

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lxskllr

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I think that's old school, no? Way back, I think that was considered appropriate tree care. Not sure what the idea is though. Maybe limit air contact?
 

stig

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Simple answer: Because they are stupid and don't know any better.


Or wait, maybe it is all part of a world wide conspiracy to enslave us all by dulling our saws.

Frankie might have some insight in that.
 

Mick!

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If you have a hollow stem that like that it will add rigidity and reduce twist.

Obviously not recommended or best practice these days, and hell on chainsaws, but I can see the logic, you’re replacing the heartwood.
 

Marc-Antoine

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Yes, giving back some mechanical support, plus trying to stop the rot and keeping away the critters, big and small.
 

Bermy

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It was the thing to do 'back in the day' when hollows in trees were always perceived as bad.
We know now that hollows/cavties are not always bad and it is a practice that has largely been discontinued...unless you still believe that flush cutting is still a thing
 

Bermy

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Cutting a branch off flush in line with the trunk...ignoring branch collars and branch bark ridges.
 

Marc-Antoine

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So basically that cuts into the trunk instead of just cutting the branch, as the so-called branch collar is actually made of trunk's fibers and not limb's.
The problem is that the frontier constructed by the tree between the trunk and the limb "just in case" is partially cut out. Then some fungi have an easier access to the main body.

In that case, when I say trunk, that's for any axis holding an other secondary axis.
 

Mick!

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It was the thing to do 'back in the day' when hollows in trees were always perceived as bad.
We know now that hollows/cavties are not always bad and it is a practice that has largely been discontinued...unless you still believe that flush cutting is still a thing



Who said that anyone believes flush cutting is still the right thing to do?


I was explaining why it was done that’s all. Just because it’s no longer the done thing, doesn’t mean it has the same level of ‘wrongness’ as flushcutting.
 
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DMc

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I believe that the use of concrete in trees is judged by how much grief it gives us and not whether it works for the trees.

Done correctly, it will permanently fill a void, give a stable surface for callus growth to flow over and in some cases even offer support.

It has been over used, badly done and often for the wrong reasons and like every other tree cutter I dread finding it in a tree I'm removing.
 

DMc

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It's all good, Bermy. I was just trying to express that it can be more about how something is done and for what reason, that makes it a good choice or not.
 
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