Tree felling vids

lxskllr

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I was with him til the halfway point.

Wow, he really cut that face deep. I guess it was to force a pinch so he could demonstrate this cool technique.
Big tree? I guess it's relative. Gerry would laugh at the trees I call big.
Yup, you're stuck. So what's this cool thing you're gonna show me?
Wait, what? Ratchet straps? You're gonna pull it with noobstraps?
I guess it works, til it doesn't... Hope your trees don't get any bigger than that...
 

lxskllr

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That's his thing now isn't it? Documentary? I like that video cause there was more than one camera, and he wasn't doing the work. I've watched a couple where the faller was filming while working, and you really miss what's trying to be shown.
 

Marc-Antoine

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I'm surprized by the shallowness of the notch. That doesn't leave much room to play with.
Though, most of the work is done early in the tree's trajectory.
 
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gf beranek

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Apr 18, 2007
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God's country, North Coast
Using Dutchman's and tapered hinges (cut-off corners and bore-cuts) to swing trees, with side favor, be the side favor by limb weight or lean, or any combination of both, has never proven to be an exact science, and never will.

The theories supporting the methods may seem intuitive to the layman. Hold a little wood here, and tickle a little there. It's magic! Wow! Oh... no...!!

As I said somewhere, once before, it's fun to play with the theories -- in wide and open lays, but when the chips come down to the money you better back it up!

Rigging, when set right, is proven science.
 

cory

Tree House enthusiast
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Aug 23, 2008
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That was a nice vid. Lotta good info presented clearly. And the dutchman effect was quite evident in the vid as the tree fell. The faller clearly knows his stuff inside out.

I guess for further understanding, one thing they could have discussed is instead of cutting the dutchman, he cut simply a tapered hinge. In that case I presume he would have needed wedges to get the tree moving to the lay so that would mean more time and effort used for the same result as opposed to using the dutchman and letting gravity and vectors do the work.

Hard to tell the dimensions of the tree from the vid, be nice to know how tall it was to understand some of the leverage and forces involved.

Lastly, I presume white fir is noted to hinge extremely well, very strong wood?

Try a dutchman in a tall white pine? Um, no.
 

Altissimus

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Jul 1, 2008
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7,317
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southern Vermont
Using Dutchman's and tapered hinges (cut-off corners and bore-cuts) to swing trees, with side favor, be the side favor by limb weight or lean, or any combination of both, has never proven to be an exact science, and never will.

The theories supporting the methods may seem intuitive to the layman. Hold a little wood here, and tickle a little there. It's magic! Wow! Oh... no...!!

As I said somewhere, once before, it's fun to play with the theories -- in wide and open lays, but when the chips come down to the money you better back it up!

Rigging, when set right, is proven science.
... why I do so much pull work w heavy line and Tirfor
 
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