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Thread: Derrick rigging and redneck cranes

  1. #11
    Treehouser Sponsor Tree09's Avatar
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    Stiff leg

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    Kyle


  2. #12
    Treehouser Sponsor Tree09's Avatar
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    Now because of the anchors holding the base and the two sides, the only substantial forces are either straight up or down. This greatly simplifies calculations of force, because you just have simple torque equations (foot pounds from boom has to be less than foot pounds from the sill plates). It also allows them to be placed on towers, which looks weird as hell at first glance. This is the one on the NASA rocket towers, where the two supports are on cantilevered supports out of the side of the building.
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    This one is actually on a tower, which is perfectly in tension or compression. The picture isn't doing it justice, because the telescope is the largest manmade object on earth iirc.
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    Kyle


  3. #13
    Treehouser Buddy's Avatar
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    That’s interesting and as simple or complex as you want it to be.
    Shawn

  4. #14
    TreeHouser Sponsor cory's Avatar
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    Good stuff, kyle
    Mastery is an illusion, grace a momentary gift, apprenticeship endless.

  5. #15
    Rodent Aviator Sponsor Skwerl2's Avatar
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    At one time I would have been interested, but then I discovered hydraulics. All this stuff goes out the window once a person gets over his fear of investing in equipment and buys his first piece of hydraulic equipment to lift logs. Hydraulics will do 100x as much with less effort once you get past the fear of investing more than a few hundred dollars into your business model.
    -Brian

  6. #16
    TreeHouser Sponsor DMc's Avatar
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    I think it is fascinating, Kyle. Thanks for taking the time to lay it all out and explain things.

    Brian, there can be many other reasons besides fear, that guide how a business takes shape.

  7. #17
    Treehouser Sponsor Tree09's Avatar
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    Hydraulics are awesome, I own a 4 ton backhoe, a 21 ton hiab (alas with a short stick), and hope to own, at the very least, a mini this next summer. I cut trees part time at best, and I love hydraulics that much. However if you are starting out, or have a situation where some rigging techniques that have literally built entire cities of skyscrapers could come in handy, this is the thread. Some of the stuff here is being overtaken by other machines, some of it is alive and well. A sideboom pipelayer is a sheerleg derrick welded to the side of a dozer. All lattice boom cranes work this way, in fact for most picks so do hydraulic cranes. Knucklebooms have found a niche in treework, but they are wayyyyyyyyyy to light duty to be used in heavy industry. These techniques still reign supreme in heavy, duty cycle work. I've seen big equipment, like a Deere 350 excavator, be completely undersized for a particular job. Just because something is old technology doesn't mean that expensive new technology is better. That said, hydraulics are awesome.
    Kyle


  8. #18
    TreeHouser ruel's Avatar
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    hydraulics wont be around forever either, good to know how it was done without them
    -Sean

  9. #19
    Woods walker Sponsor Burnham's Avatar
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    Old school methods, learned or re-invented.

    I have to admit to a little pridefulness...having on some occasions seen far better educated than I types...engineers or architects, etc. look at me with surprise, and maybe even a little admiration, when I moved some seemingly unmovable item with a bunch or pulleys, lines, and a bit of muscle, electric winch, snowmobile, ATV, even plain old gravity, or some other power source.

    I liked those rare moments quite a lot .

    We should not be surprised that I came to be called on somewhat often over time from those selfsame experts, when a big thing needed to be moved when blunt power was hard to deploy.

    So pay attention, kids. Knowing these skills can make you valuable.

    Great posts, Kyle.
    "Confidence is the feeling you sometimes have before you fully understand the situation."

  10. #20
    Treehouser Sponsor Tree09's Avatar
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    If you could please B, relate a story or trick you have utilised in the past. I remember reading a story by Jerry about him winning a beer by using a gin pole as a yarder, tightening a swingline, then easing off the load drifting it to a loading area. I'm sure you have tons of hands on experience of solving problems in this manner, and guys like me need to learn more. In construction the insurance companies have gotten their fangs into using ingenuity and rigging skills, demanding manufacturer stamped load ratings on stuff that used to be done with common sense. Slowly the skilled part of the rigging trade is disappearing I'm afraid, and if nothing else sharing together here might help that.
    Kyle


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