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Thread: Derrick rigging and redneck cranes

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    Treehouser Sponsor Tree09's Avatar
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    Default Derrick rigging and redneck cranes

    I'm putting this in the rigging area because I think that's where I guessed it should go, if you want to, feel free to move it to the gear section or wherever you feel it should be (garbage can, etc lol). My day job is heavy pipe construction, and as part of our apprenticeship, they have over a year of school just on rigging. I fell in love with the problem solving that comes with it, and how every trick or technique adds together to form more and more understanding of how us weakling humans can move stuff that we can't come close to moving by hand. Yes I'm a huge nerd.

    Some of the pictures and stuff aren't directly related to tree work, but then again all rigging is related, and so it could be. Quite a few of them could be rigged up at a yard, or on a trailer, and since they lack the sophisticated stuff of today's cranes they are actually quite robust, requiring little maintenance. They can be rigged with rope or wire, or even chainfalls and such. Ok here goes.

    Since this is a tree forum, I'll start with ones used traditionally in logging (from what I've read). The first one is basically a gin pole, with a speedline to control the rigging point. This could be used to load or unload a trailer, and by moving the speedline around you can even change where you are placing stuff.
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    They are using two load lines, so you can lift level, which isn't necessary but kinda handy and cool. The next one solves that problem more elegantly by using a spider leg to pick level.
    Kyle


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    This one adds a boom, basically turning it into a guy derrick. The gin pole is held upright by guy lines, which actually take the force to an anchor. I'll get to anchors later, once again if anyone has anything to add or point out, please do so. So the gin pole is handy, but all loads lifted are at a line angle to where they swing to the gin pole, so by adding a boom we can push the load out to a radius. The thing I noticed on this is the spider leg type to pick both lines with one hoist, the spread boom, and how it nicely saddles the mast. There is a drawback to this however, and that is by adding the second pick point closer to the mast, you have added a bending force to the boom. A single point pick with a spreader bar underneath would assure that everything is in compression loading, and then maybe you wouldn't need to use 3 trees in building it.

    The other really cool thing is the log off to the right. It's tied off to where when you let off of the other swing guy, it pulls the boom back to a certain spot. That's handy sometimes, and on the work pics thread, I solved the same problem by simply rigging the butt of the boom off to the side. For heavier loads, the log trick is better.
    Kyle


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    Here's some pictures of the log loader with boom, which of the two, is better because it can pick far greater capacity because you don't have the highline multiplier on the rigging (keeping the skyline tight takes dramatically more force than the boom).

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    In the last one you can even see the log suspended off to the right.
    Kyle


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    Here's another way, they are using ramps, and a sheerleg guyed to a stump. While it would work for loading and is quickly rigged, you don't have much control of the load, and parbuckling accomplishes the same with less force. What is handy tho, if you only have a few to load, you can use this to lift up the log, and then back the trailer under it. Moving trailers under the load is a very handy trick, one that is used all of the time in construction. By eliminating extra movement with a crane, you make the operation safer.

    All of the others so far had been with existing trees as a gin pole. That is ideal because the tree in anchored in place with its roots, and will resist the side to side forces placed on the base. Another way to accomplish the same thing would be to step the mast in a hole, or have a baseplate that is otherwise anchored to the ground.
    Kyle


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    The guy derrick is a mast that's guyed, with a boom. They were used extensively in ironworking, because you could jump the whole thing up several floors by using the boom as a gin pole to raise the mast, which would then lift the boom. It was also used for quarries, earthmoving operations, and just about anything else that needed done. By using a mast not a tree, you could place them anywhere, and a few anchors and you are good to go. Some of the largest crane picks are still done using them, because they are so efficient.
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    Kyle


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    More gin poles

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    Kyle


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    Yup, I have no life lolClick image for larger version. 

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    Kyle


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    Food for thought.
    Peter

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    Applied Rigging ... You ain't the only one that loves this stuff.

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    Okay good, I feel better now hahahahaha. As you can see if you look closely at the last pic, there are guylines all around. Which while easy to set up quickly also show the guy derricks biggest weakness, and that is that unless the anchors are way far away and maybe even higher than the base, they are always in the way. The mast then is usually higher than the boom, so you don't have to undo each guy to pass it, you can just boom all the way up. This is slow, but if you are only working in a small quadrant, is not that bad. The one way to greatly improve on this is the stiffleg derrick. It uses two 45? spars to brace the mast, and 2 spars to go on the bottom forming two triangles 90? apart, with the mast being one side of each triangle. Because the spars can take either compression or tension loads, you can swing the boom anywhere between the two supports (~270?). Because there isn't guylines everywhere, you can just move freely, greatly speeding up the work. This is basically what a modern crane is based on, and they perform about the same. The difference is that all three points are anchored to the ground, and that is what resists the overturning force.
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    Something like this would very easily be built at a yard or on a trailer. This is a small one, and if built for a trailer it would require enough weight in it to counter balance the load, or a guyline or two till you got it heavy enough.
    Kyle


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