Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Full Wrap vs. 3/4 Wrap?

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Treehouser rfwoody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    North Mississippi
    Age
    63
    Posts
    178

    Default Full Wrap vs. 3/4 Wrap?

    I don't live in the Pacific NW, but I just got an ms461 with wrap handles (I believe they are 3/4 wrap), and I really like the feel of this (to me) heavier chainsaw.

    I have an ms660 which I use for milling -- which is lately seeming a little to heavy/unwieldy to use for falling.

    ...But I'm thinking about putting a wrap handle the on the ms660 so it will feel better in my hands.

    Question is... should I get a 3/4 wrap handle or a Full wrap handle?

    P.S. I still need to learn how to take full advantage of the (3/4?) wrap handles... e.g. doing face cuts and back cut all from same side of the tree.

    Thanks a lot for any responses!
    - Robert
    Quit city job... Now, slowly learning and doing in general direction of some kind of tree work.

  2. #2
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    1,566

    Default

    Only downside of a full wrap handle is you can't cut dirty stump wood with it. That's what a stump grinder is for. Much more ergonomic. Useful in the tree where the position of the bar (top side or bottom side of powerhead) in relation to your climbing gear/ rigging gear can make a difference.

  3. #3
    TreeHouser Gypo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Western Oregon
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Stock handlebars only come in 3/4 on stihls as far as I know, that and half, no full. A guy I used 5o cut with had some after market full wraps though. Dunno where he got em. This was on 066.

    In all but very rare circumstances you should always face the tree from the same side you back it up, its more accurate and youre not under the side lean. Only reason to change sides is when your bar is too short to reach through ( which is often) and you need to clean up a face, or corner up the backcut. Even then youre more often in front of the tree or behind it rather than actually on the other side. Average tree- face and backup from same side.

  4. #4
    TreeHouser Sponsor cory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    CT
    Age
    60
    Posts
    15,610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gypo View Post

    In all but very rare circumstances you should always face the tree from the same side you back it up
    +1. And you can do that with regular or wrap handlebars.
    Mastery is an illusion, grace a momentary gift, apprenticeship endless.

  5. #5
    THE CALM ONE!!!! Sponsor squisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Vernon, B.C.
    Age
    42
    Posts
    33,651

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cory View Post
    +1. And you can do that with regular or wrap handlebars.
    Cory if you are doing this by switching hands. Remember every time you run a saw left handed it is not how the saw was designed.

    I am left handed and it's great to be ambidextrous, but as soon as you cut left hand on trigger you are nine times out of ten putting yourself in a worse position for kickback.

    3/4 wrap was on everyone of my saws except for the top handles.

    Yes I can switch hit on a saw no problem, and sometimes it's nescessary. But 3/4 wrap gives you the most, safest, ergonomic, positioning options possible.

    As for cutting stumps. I never had an issue cutting as low as I liked with a 3/4 wrap and I was the one grinding the stumps.

    I found the only thing I didn't like about a 3/4 wrap is if somehow you got your hands on a 1/2 wrap it can be kind of dangerous going for the 3/4 section when it's not there.

  6. #6
    Woods walker Sponsor Burnham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Western Oregon
    Age
    63
    Posts
    15,676

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by squisher View Post
    Cory if you are doing this by switching hands. Remember every time you run a saw left handed it is not how the saw was designed.

    I am left handed and it's great to be ambidextrous, but as soon as you cut left hand on trigger you are nine times out of ten putting yourself in a worse position for kickback.

    3/4 wrap was on everyone of my saws except for the top handles.

    Yes I can switch hit on a saw no problem, and sometimes it's nescessary. But 3/4 wrap gives you the most, safest, ergonomic, positioning options possible.

    As for cutting stumps. I never had an issue cutting as low as I liked with a 3/4 wrap and I was the one grinding the stumps.

    I found the only thing I didn't like about a 3/4 wrap is if somehow you got your hands on a 1/2 wrap it can be kind of dangerous going for the 3/4 section when it's not there.
    This is all correct, so listen and learn, kids. All the other stuff is noise.
    "Confidence is the feeling you sometimes have before you fully understand the situation."

  7. #7
    Treehouser rfwoody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    North Mississippi
    Age
    63
    Posts
    178

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burnham View Post
    This is all correct, so listen and learn, kids. All the other stuff is noise.
    Thanks for your comment Mr. Burnham.
    - Robert
    Quit city job... Now, slowly learning and doing in general direction of some kind of tree work.

  8. #8
    Treehouser Sponsor Skwerl2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    central Florida
    Age
    52
    Posts
    591

    Default

    I like making low stump cuts because my stump guy charges me less. I'm also fairly ambidextrous handling a saw so it really doesn't matter not having the extra handle on the sprocket side. I prefer keeping one hand on the rear handle and one on the top of the top handle, left or right makes no difference. Also the full wrap handle makes it a pain in the ass to pull the sprocket cover for cleaning or chain swaps. If somebody gave me a saw with a full wrap handle I'd buy a regular handle for it.
    -Brian

  9. #9
    TreeHouser
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    France
    Posts
    987

    Default

    Many customers don't want to pay more for a stump grinding, so I have to ALAP the stumps often. Even the sprocket cover is cumbersome!

    Beside that, it's very rare that I miss the extra part of a round handle during a cut.

  10. #10
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    1,566

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc-Antoine View Post
    Many customers don't want to pay more for a stump grinding, so I have to ALAP the stumps often. Even the sprocket cover is cumbersome!

    Beside that, it's very rare that I miss the extra part of a round handle during a cut.


    Nobody wants to pay for stump grinding. Hope you're charging for an ALAP cut over a standard cut.

    Included in the cost of removal, a stump 4-6" above the soil line. $300 for grind and clean-up, $50 for cutting ALAP. Easy for them to pay $50 if you explain that it is the worst type of cutting, with the most chance of hitting metal/ rocks, wear and tear, need for sharpening.




    The difference in cut height is a few inches between the two wraps.

    There is probably considerably more bar and chain wear with ALAP cutting. You're most times going to have to do hard, continuous cutting with a hard to keep sharp chain, in dusty conditions. Time/ tools for sharpening should be accounted for.

    I cut stumps as low as reasonable for stump grinding. Seems to work out. Rather have better ergonomics for most of the saws operating time. To each, their own.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •