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Thread: What is a Good Way to Attach a Pull Line to a Trailer Hitch on a Pickup Truck?

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    Treehouser rfwoody's Avatar
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    Default What is a Good Way to Attach a Pull Line to a Trailer Hitch on a Pickup Truck?

    What is the best way to attach a rope (pull line) to a pickup truck trailer hitch?

    I have been just simply tying my rope to the ball of my trailer hitch.

    However I am afraid I am losing some of the strength of the rope at the loop because of too small a radius of the hitch ball.

    Is there something better (with a wider radius) for attaching a pull rope to a pickup truck trailer hitch, so a minimum of rope strength is lost?

    Thanks!

    Robert.
    - Robert
    Quit city job... Now, slowly learning and doing in general direction of some kind of tree work.

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    Dormant hero!! Sponsor sotc's Avatar
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    Most pickups don't weigh enough to pull hard enough to worry about breaking a typical bull rope we use imo. But you could attach a porty or build a bollard with an appropriate diameter if you like. I'd rather block purchase or find another way if you're that close to breaking lines
    Willie
    Southern Oregon Tree Care,LLC
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    Treehouser rfwoody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sotc View Post
    Most pickups don't weigh enough to pull hard enough to worry about breaking a typical bull rope we use imo. But you could attach a porty or build a bollard with an appropriate diameter if you like. I'd rather block purchase or find another way if you're that close to breaking lines
    Thanks Willie.
    Maybe I'm overthinking it.
    For example, I have a 1/2" 3-strand rope with a Maasdam rope puller.
    The average strength of the rope shows 5700 lbs
    The Maasdam rope puller limit is 1500 lbs
    But I understand with rope you take one-tenth to one-fifth of the average (or is it max) strength to get the working limit.
    So that would limit my 1500 rope to 150 to 300 lbs ... (not very much or very practical it seems).
    So I was trying to save every bit of strength I could.. e.g. In the radius of where I tied it.
    - Robert
    Quit city job... Now, slowly learning and doing in general direction of some kind of tree work.

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    Student of the Jedi treebilly's Avatar
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    I think the 1500# on the masdem already has the safety factor in it.
    I like willies thought of the bollard. I'd prefer one on the front of the truck also.
    -Rich

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    Rodent Aviator Sponsor Skwerl2's Avatar
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    Tie a standing bowline in your pull rope, making a large loop. Hook the loop over the ball, wrapping it twice so it won't slip off.

    Whenever I'm pulling with a machine I prefer running the line through a block attached to the base of a tree so that my pull angle is not lifting the back of the machine up off the ground. This can be especially important if you're pulling with something light like a pickup truck.
    -Brian

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    Treehouser rfwoody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by treebilly View Post
    I think the 1500# on the masdem already has the safety factor in it.
    I like willies thought of the bollard. I'd prefer one on the front of the truck also.
    Thanks Rich.
    A dedicated bollard may be expensive.. but I think I get Willie's idea about the portawrap... I could attach it to my trailer hitch ball with something more heavy duty, then affix my 1/2 rope to the portawrap.
    - Robert
    Quit city job... Now, slowly learning and doing in general direction of some kind of tree work.

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    Treehouser rfwoody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skwerl2 View Post
    Tie a standing bowline in your pull rope, making a large loop. Hook the loop over the ball, wrapping it twice so it won't slip off.

    Whenever I'm pulling with a machine I prefer running the line through a block attached to the base of a tree so that my pull angle is not lifting the back of the machine up off the ground. This can be especially important if you're pulling with something light like a pickup truck.
    Thanks Brian.

    When you say "Whenever I'm pulling with a machine I prefer running the line through a block attached to the base of a tree so that my pull angle is not lifting the back of the machine up off the ground."

    I know this will be a dumb question... but if the rope runs through the block at the *base* of the tree... how do you a good pull angle at the *top* of the tree?
    - Robert
    Quit city job... Now, slowly learning and doing in general direction of some kind of tree work.

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    TreeHouser Mick!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skwerl2 View Post
    Tie a standing bowline in your pull rope, making a large loop. Hook the loop over the ball, wrapping it twice so it won't slip off.

    Whenever I'm pulling with a machine I prefer running the line through a block attached to the base of a tree so that my pull angle is not lifting the back of the machine up off the ground. This can be especially important if you're pulling with something light like a pickup truck.
    That's a really good tip, and like all the best ones, bleeding obvious!
    Manly trucks for manly men.



    Mick

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    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    You can chain your rope-puller to the hitch.

    Three strand is very dynamic. If you break it, it will rocket àpart. A piece of plywood to protect the operator of the puller is advisable for hard pulls. Ropes lose strength.

    With anchoring the RP with knotted half- inch rope, as an anchor sling, you are maybe not making the rigging rope the weak link in your system. If your anchor sling breaks, the RP will be part of the rocket.

    As Brian said, appropriate line angle, slightly upward to hitch if possible, is important.

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    Dormant hero!! Sponsor sotc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfwoody View Post
    Thanks Willie.
    Maybe I'm overthinking it.
    For example, I have a 1/2" 3-strand rope with a Maasdam rope puller.
    The average strength of the rope shows 5700 lbs
    The Maasdam rope puller limit is 1500 lbs
    But I understand with rope you take one-tenth to one-fifth of the average (or is it max) strength to get the working limit.
    So that would limit my 1500 rope to 150 to 300 lbs ... (not very much or very practical it seems).
    So I was trying to save every bit of strength I could.. e.g. In the radius of where I tied it.
    Order 150-200' of half inch stable braid. Might hurt at first but good equipment always does. 10k breaking.
    Willie
    Southern Oregon Tree Care,LLC
    “Pruning is one of the best things an arborist can do for a tree but one of the worst things we can do to a tree.” Shigo

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