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Thread: Guying a big log

  1. #11
    TreeHouse Administrator MasterBlaster's Avatar
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    Outfreakingstanding!

  2. #12
    TreeHouser MrMoon5shine's Avatar
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    Impressive to say the least !

    Quote Originally Posted by cory View Post
    So I'm not completely clear on how you kept the lines evenly tight given their different elevations on the trunk. How'd you guard against 'zippering'- one taking all the weight and breaking, thus transferring all the weight to the next one, etc. Also, I would think it would be tricky with all the surrounding timber to have adequate space for the lines to move with the falling tree without getting hung up prematurely.
    I too, am wondering this, by watching the video over it looks like the lines were more dynamic then a standard bull line... were they climbing lines perhaps? I am thinking the extra stretch would help "absorb" some of the difference and help with the shock load forces.
    I don't always do firewood, but when I do I charge my customers accordingly.

  3. #13
    TreeHouser Sponsor Grendel's Avatar
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    True Blue

    Or not at all that. . . haha
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterward.”
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    Sam

    MI-4209A

  4. #14
    TreeHouser Sponsor RegC's Avatar
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    Thanks all.

    I had 2 × 3/4 lines and I x 5/8. Yale, Samson and Teufelberger....all pretty stretchy.

    The highest line was just a failsafe in case the top broke loose....which it did but without going anywhere. The Bottom 2 did the work.

    The homeowner delt with all the lumber....I just had to leave them safe and accessible. He'd put a road in at the bottom, but was worried about the whole front row of trees since scaping away such a big area of the embankment. He does intend to replant.

    Cory I set the lines on the log relative to their ground anchors, and the direction of fall. It looked right when I set it up, so I didn't over think it. As you can see, it worked out fine.

  5. #15
    TreeHouser Sponsor August Hunicke's Avatar
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    I remember seeing this job on the TH. I like the Cory question and also the answer. I've stopped some massive forces a few times, some which resembled the Gulivers Travels tie-down.

  6. #16
    TreeHouser Mick!'s Avatar
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    I remember the job. The vid illustrated very well the forces.

    Good stuff.
    I feel that the evening ceases to be languid.



    Mick

  7. #17
    TreeHouser Sponsor cory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RegC View Post

    As you can see, it worked out fine.
    For sure. I was thinking it might also work if the ropes were tied to the same (failsafe) anchor, might be easier to account for the various angles and tensions. But plan A worked perfect.

    That must have been a bit gripping for you before the tree hit and stayed put, in case it didn't work.
    Mastery is an illusion, grace a momentary gift, apprenticeship endless.

  8. #18
    TreeHouser Sponsor Raj's Avatar
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    Big skillz for that job!
    Peter

  9. #19
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    Could you have anchored at the base of the anchor trees, perhaps with a tensionless anchor, gone to the spar and taken a couple turns and then back to the anchor point with another tensionless anchor, or bowline/ running bowline/ double-hole bowline?

    We considered this once for a Parks tree that was terrible, and immediately next to a water treatment facility. We didn't take that one on during my stay. I was figuring this would be 3-4 times as strong by using two legs and no knots.

    Seems like if it broke, it would have been pretty catastrophic.

    Clearly this worked. Seems like it might be heavy work even on heavy rigging. Hella big tree.


    We've left extended branch stubs for some help on a slope before.

  10. #20
    TreeHouser Sponsor cory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanKroll View Post
    Could you have anchored at the base of the anchor trees, perhaps with a tensionless anchor, gone to the spar and taken a couple turns and then back to the anchor point with another tensionless anchor, or bowline/ running bowline/ double-hole bowline?
    .
    That sounds like a real good idea, too.
    Mastery is an illusion, grace a momentary gift, apprenticeship endless.

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