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Thread: Pistol Grip Wrist Saving Arborist Tool

  1. #131
    More biners!!! Sponsor pantheraba's Avatar
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    Jomo, your enthusiasm is good to see and I am watching along with other folks to see where this goes.

    I am like some of these other guys...I could definitely use a video to help understand better how it's going to work. Without a better explanation or video it's like snake oil to me. I still have not wrapped my pea-noodle sized brain around all the aspects of this.

    I have a rough idea and can have a blurred fantasy of how it might work but the details escape me. Sitting on the sidelines here awaiting further enlightenment.
    Gary

  2. #132
    TreeHouser Jomo's Avatar
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    Thanks Gary.

    I chose The Tree House to blab about my riggin pistol cuz it's where the industry outlaws hang out. I know the TCIA'll give it both thumbs down cuz it sorta kinda most definitely promotes one handed cuttin.

    But this pistol's intended for use on small cut n chuck stuff, not big stuff by any means.

    Way back in the late 80's I bought my first 020T with a magnesium case, and paid 750 bucks for it. I was catchin trunk sections old school style with my nyebuck lanyard supportin my catch line, when my too short gaffs kicked out n the whole mess started started draggin me down the trunk in a very ungainly n undignified manner.

    I knew I shoulda chucked my saw n used both hands to regain control of the situation, but bein a stubborn bloke, I held on to that saw as the riggin dragged me downward about 15-20 feet before coming to a branch collar trunk bulge that stopped my journey downward.

    However holdin on to that shiny new 020 cost me dearly, fracturing a few of the many bones that comprise the human wrist. I was outta action for many weeks before a custom wrist brace allowed me to return to work in a limited capacity. Holdin on to that box of a saw ended up costing me many thousands of dollars in lost work n med bills.

    But it did give me a new and profound appreciation for how fragile the human wrist can be, and how critical it's proper functioning is to a demolition climber.

    Jomo

  3. #133
    TreeHouser Mick!'s Avatar
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    Weren't you using a tool strop? I know some don't.
    I feel that the evening ceases to be languid.



    Mick

  4. #134
    TreeHouser Jomo's Avatar
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    Yeah Mick, I'm in the some don't category, except in certain situations, usin big saws.

    I use allota zip cuts on vertical leaders that zip down in close enough proximity to me to snag a saw lanyard n ruin my day.

    Most definitely the sorta climber you don't wanna mimick!

    Jomo

  5. #135
    TreeHouser Mick!'s Avatar
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    Each to their own, it's always baffled me though.

    By zip cuts I assume you mean what I (amongst others) call a spear cut.

    Can't say I've ever felt close to having an incident with a saw strop because of it.
    I feel that the evening ceases to be languid.



    Mick

  6. #136
    THE CALM ONE!!!! Sponsor squisher's Avatar
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    I'm still watching, but I don't even do treework anymore. My wrist, tendons, hands weren't gonna take it. So I sold out. But I still have interest in the industry and it's innovations. So I do wish you the best of luck with your device.

  7. #137
    TreeHouser Jomo's Avatar
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    Hang in there Squish lad.

    What was it Dirty Harry said.

    A man's gotta know his limitations!

    If yu kin lasso a dang horse or cow?

    You must not be in that bad a shape!

    Jomo

  8. #138
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    I can see the deal with the electromagnet, but what about the wind-rocker?

  9. #139
    TreeHouser Jomo's Avatar
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    The Wind Rocker?

    Hah!

    Renewable energy n industrial sustainabilty's for droolin namsy pansey librools!

    I learned that the hard way a decade ago Marc!

    Jomo

  10. #140
    THE CALM ONE!!!! Sponsor squisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jomo View Post
    Hang in there Squish lad.

    What was it Dirty Harry said.

    A man's gotta know his limitations!

    If yu kin lasso a dang horse or cow?

    You must not be in that bad a shape!

    Jomo
    I'm in decent shape, if you think swinging a heading rope is anything like running a saw in a tree, well you've never done team roping, I can tell you that. As the header if you haven't caught in the first handful of seconds, it's all over. And the curious part about it, is I had carpal tunnel surgery on my right hand(I'm left handed) and while there's discomfort it greatly helped the numbness, lost strength though. Don't need a lot of strength to swing a rope. But I could never do it with my left hand because of the numbness. So the ironic part is if I hadn't had that surgery On my offhand I'd never be able to team rope. As headers swing with the right in team roping, there is no real way around that.

    Of course I get by. I'm a chimney sweep now, and have to use my hands quite a bit still. It's nothing like the abuse of running saw all day, or pulling on cold steel(highlead logging) with all your might.

    It's not the only reason I left treework behind, it burned me out. I'm detail oriented, and can worry every last detail. The constant stress of laying it on the line over and over again was wearing me out. Now as a sweep, when I worry every little detail it just makes me better at my job. Lol.

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