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Thread: one handed saw use

  1. #51
    Treehouser Sponsor pete mctree's Avatar
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    Not massively experienced, but very talented & productive young climber. I should call him, we have not spoken for a few years.
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    TreeHouser Sponsor cory's Avatar
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    It is hard to understand how wicked handsaws can be until you get bitten by one, imo.
    Mastery is an illusion, grace a momentary gift, apprenticeship endless.

  3. #53
    California Hillbilly Sponsor CurSedVoyce's Avatar
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    As stated before, I tell any trainee that the handsaw is as dangerous as a chainsaw. You can seriously fug yourself up with it. Come to think of it, almost all my hand injuries are from one. And stubs, and crushing in that order. Then maybe a rope burn...
    Oh look a chart with numbers but no cause or report behind the injury to make an opinion from. Must be one handing.. Tada, Junk Science.
    I am with Pete and I know many others here. Work positioning is key with every cut. You get sloppy, complacent, fatigued, tired, hungry, angry... you are setting yourself up for mayhem.
    Interesting how a limited gene pool and a limited labor force seem to be so closely related.

  4. #54
    TreeHouser Mick!'s Avatar
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    Friday afternoon, last tree of the week, wet and tired, lowering an oak limb, it swung towards me, I stuck my hand out, totally unnecessarily as another branch was protecting me. Minor crush on my thumb joint, hurt like hell but now (Sunday night) it's clear that there is no serious damage.

    Re the debate, one handing ok. Cutting and holding bad, as my left arm will testify.
    I feel that the evening ceases to be languid.



    Mick

  5. #55
    TreeHouser Sponsor Altissimus's Avatar
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    Agreed on the holding part , learned not to do it w a close call. I just throw a couple of Slings on.

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    California Hillbilly Sponsor CurSedVoyce's Avatar
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    Usually, if I don't use a sling and do hold the limb, I finish the cut with the hand saw. Gently.
    Still hard on your muscles and tendons though.
    Interesting how a limited gene pool and a limited labor force seem to be so closely related.

  7. #57
    Treehouser biggun's Avatar
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    Idepending on the tree I one hand a fair bit. It tends to be an on the spot decision based on what I need the wood to do.

    A few years ago I had pretty bad tennis elbow. Probably from one handing the 200 all the time. I made an effort to two hand the saw wereever possible. Tennis elbow cleared up.

    I took two things from that.

    1 one handing a saw puts more strain on ligaments, tendons and muscles.

    2 I bought a 150, had it timed and modded. Makes one handing much easier.
    Rich.

  8. #58
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    I think not cutting oneself is half of it.
    Death by a thousand cuts wears out joints and muscles.

    I think that ways to increase two-handed saw use on conifers include speed lining, bouquet rigging, and starting cuts with a top cut with a handsaw, allowing it to peel and hang, or guiding it into an appropriate drop zone without holding. Cut and hold happens, but it's hard on the body. Some species peel and hang better than others... If it will safely peel down and hang, its less shock load to the body, to finish the cut with the limb pinned to the tree.

    Flush a half dozen hand- cut stubs at a time with the chainsaw. If you can't let the stub fall, stub off at 6", so you cut the stub and let it rest on the front of the saw (horizontal), bar pointed up, stub held against bar with left pinkie.

    Or follow through on the cut, getting the stub to hit the top of the moving chain, shooting it into the clear.


    Much easier to legislate how many hands are on the saw versus how good of work-positioning the climber has.

  9. #59
    Acolyte of the short bar Sponsor Bermy's Avatar
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    Reg, do you remember in the NPTC stuff that top handled saws could be used with one hand as long as there was nothing in the kickback zone...rope, arms etc.
    I think the standard was to use them with two hands at all times...unless by doing so it was then unsafe.

    On a standard setting event I went to the guys did an actual climb and cut and demonstrated the situations where one handing for the purposes of the assessment was ok. It seemed a pretty sensible approach to me.

    We all know after the fact of training (and assessment for some) we do things that are not strictly 'by the book', but we do so from a position of knowledge, we know what to anticipate for that could go wrong so hopefully when we step outside the box we do it with our eyes wide open!

    Personally I find it a bit hard to one hand a 200 and I would not be able to control it if it kicked, so I do it when the cutting is level or below me so gravity is my helper. The 150 is a different think, I have to be sensible about one handing it because the ease with which I can do it has the potential to lead to complacency and maybe a major OOPSIE.
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  10. #60
    TreeHouser Sponsor RegC's Avatar
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    I got the nptc ticket in 93 I believe, when it first came out. Then it expired and or changed many years later and I had get the updated version. I don't actually remember what was involved so much, but it was pretty basic I think.

    I honestly avoid one handling, unless I think I'll gain an advantage. This might be to give me better control, enginomics or where I think it's safer to put the maximum amount of space between my self and the work. And in doing so I up my concentration and focus, because I know what's at stake. It's never out of laziness or habit, as was the damming judgement in those articles. There's lots of ways to get ones point of view across to influence people, but Marks all knowing delivery was not a good one from where I'm standing.

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