Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: 115' American Chestnut in Maine woods

  1. #1
    TreeHouser
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    99

    Default 115' American Chestnut in Maine woods

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/...-save-chesnuts

    The last thread about this had to be deleted. Apparently when Jomo embedded the link to the audio for this it locked the thread. I didn't even know we could do that and I am glad he attempted because that would have been nice. I guess we shouldn't try that again.

    Anyways, I realize this is a repost but if anyone is still wanting to discuss it they can and if anyone in the future is searching the forums for American Chestnut info at least this will be here.

  2. #2
    Captain Zero! Sponsor FireFighterZero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    North Central Montana, bloody cold!
    Age
    34
    Posts
    15,304

    Default

    I think it raises an interesting question about GMO's. Apparently they are working to modify these trees genetically to be more resistant to whatever is killing them.

    I think its a good use of science.
    Winter is sure as hell here! I told you it was coming!
    Jim

  3. #3
    TreeHouser Jomo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    San Diego
    Age
    58
    Posts
    31,946

    Default

    Oops!

    Danged trouble maker!

    You wouldn't believe how hard I've tried to solve this iPad embed code conundrum.

    Apologies for lnadvertently lockin up your thread mate.

    An xcellent thread it is too.

    I envision mutated eucs with bulbous bases, capable of housing a family of five!

    Jomo

  4. #4
    TreeHouser Sponsor DMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Age
    64
    Posts
    1,879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FireFighterZero View Post
    I think it raises an interesting question about GMO's. Apparently they are working to modify these trees genetically to be more resistant to whatever is killing them. I think its a good use of science.
    Trying to improve them is what caused the initial problem. Science and it's wonders have never been the problem, it is man's total inability in using them responsibly that is.

  5. #5
    Captain Zero! Sponsor FireFighterZero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    North Central Montana, bloody cold!
    Age
    34
    Posts
    15,304

    Default

    Were they a hybred or something? How did the screw them up?
    Winter is sure as hell here! I told you it was coming!
    Jim

  6. #6
    TreeHouser Jomo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    San Diego
    Age
    58
    Posts
    31,946

    Default

    Listening to the provided link tells the story, wiped out by an accidentally introduced Asian blight.

    Jomo

  7. #7
    TreeHouser Sponsor DMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Age
    64
    Posts
    1,879

    Default

    I heard that work was being done, using asian stock, to try and improve the quality of the nuts. It is really hard to find facts to support this because there were some big names involved so I think that some of the history has been sanitized. Being fair though, the american chestnut was on borrowed time anyway, like so many other things that have been infested from introduced pests as the world borders get blurred.

  8. #8
    TreeHouser
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DMc View Post
    I heard that work was being done, using asian stock, to try and improve the quality of the nuts. It is really hard to find facts to support this because there were some big names involved so I think that some of the history has been sanitized. Being fair though, the american chestnut was on borrowed time anyway, like so many other things that have been infested from introduced pests as the world borders get blurred.
    The American Chestnut Foundation is backcrossing the Chinese Chestnut into the American Chestnut. The nuts are great but for a lot of humans the important part is the lumber. It grows faster than oaks, is easy to work for furniture or other woodworking, is quite strong, and is very rot resistant. It would be a wonderful timber to have available again and since it comprised as much as 30% of the forest it was a big loss when the blight functionally wiped them out.

    The American Chestnut Cooperators Foundation is working on finding and selecting naturally resistant American Chestnuts. They aren't interested in crossing at all with the Chinese Chestnut for blight resistance.

  9. #9
    TreeHouser Sponsor DMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Age
    64
    Posts
    1,879

    Default

    My comments above were about the initial infection around 1904 not today's current work. There is a lot of current work being done with asian x american hybrids and gene splicing using the fungal resistance in oats and probably anything else that might work. Nothing says monoculture better than plants coming out of labs with numbers for names.
    Man's long term success rate with anything that goes against the laws of the earth, sucks.

  10. #10
    Treehouser Sponsor chris_girard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Gilmanton, N.H.
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    I totally agree with that.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •