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Thread: Citrus tree in decline

  1. #1
    TreeHouser Sponsor
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    Default Citrus tree in decline

    I'm looking for some help in diagnosing this grapefruit tree for a friend. Sentimental value and the fruit is very good regardless of the structural issues with the cavities in the trunk (common in older citrus trees). I found several places where a clear sap was oozing out of the bark with no visible holes. The sap was hard and crystallized with no distinguishable odor. Lots of small deadwood in the crown and I noticed some of the sap at the branch collar of a couple dead twigs.




  2. #2
    TreeHouser Sponsor flushcut's Avatar
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    Weeping gumanosis maybe, I don't know squat about citrus trees.

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    Mac Daddy Sponsor Al Smith's Avatar
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    I don't either except an orange tree can have blossums ,little green fruit and nice plump juicey oranges fully matured on the same tree at the same time .
    Nice tastey honey bells at my wifes aunts in Sebring

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    California Hillbilly Sponsor CurSedVoyce's Avatar
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    Lilly says it's icky... I am going to roll with her opinion.
    Interesting how a limited gene pool and a limited labor force seem to be so closely related.

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    My limited research is pointing toward a fungal issue, possibly root rot. Still looking.

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    TreeHouser Sponsor Tree Reb's Avatar
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    That's an old tree, I don't think I've seen a grapefruit that big so I can understand the sentimental value.

    Some different citrus problems here but it looks like Citrus Gummosis, there's a bit about it here:http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/science...iseases#citrus

    But this guy has a good page about it.http://www.gardenguyhawaii.com/2012/...-gummosis.html



    I'd use this but you can find something like it. http://www.yates.com.au/products/dis...per-fungicide/

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    Mac Daddy Sponsor Al Smith's Avatar
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    When I was in central Fla 4 or so years ago there was a blight of some sort .There were acres and acres of groves they bull dozed out and set fire to .

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    That was citrus canker, Al.

    Thanks for the leads, Steve.

  9. #9
    Mac Daddy Sponsor Al Smith's Avatar
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    On that we had a type of spruce canker a few years back .Don't know it's the same .The state forester told me it was because of two extremely wet springs in a row .Spruce being a mountain tree cannot take that much water in heavy loam rich Ohio soils .

    Probabley not the same thing in Florida citrus .

    Edited after thought .You know B. not that I know but those blue spots on that old grapefruit tree does resemble that canker in the spruce .

  10. #10
    Climbing Up Sponsor stehansen's Avatar
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    Sticky/Oozing Trunk
    Older trees may be afflicted by brown rot gummosis at the base of the trunk, caused by a soil fungus called Phytophthera. Typically, you will notice a sticky substance coming out of the tree's trunk. Weed eater and rodent damage can lead to gummy bark secretions. Keep the base of the trunk dry, and clear away any soil, mulch, grass, or weeds that might be holding moisture at the base. Trim away infected areas with a sharp (clean) knife, use tree seal to cover the wound and monitor for recurrence. Remove decayed bark to a point where no discoloration is visible. If water hits the trunk from sprinklers, that can trigger the fungus as well. Make sure water does not stand in a basin around the trunk during winter rains or after irrigating. Be sure to always clean pruners with alcohol or another antiseptic cleaner between uses to prevent disease spread among trees.

    Got this from here http://www.fourwindsgrowers.com/solv...-ailments.html

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