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Thread: Level Stumps on Steep Ground

  1. #81
    TreeHouse Administrator MasterBlaster's Avatar
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    I thought it was some kinda oddball stump vise.

  2. #82
    California Hillbilly Sponsor CurSedVoyce's Avatar
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    Wow!

    Which way did he go George? Which way did he go?

    Interesting how a limited gene pool and a limited labor force seem to be so closely related.

  3. #83
    TreeHouser Jed's Avatar
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    Hey Forestryworks: Northern New Mexico!! What kind of a goofball treeguy would cut firewood there. (Willie's getting a good LOL on that one.) That's where I lived and worked for about seven years. Probably says a great deal about why I have such a hard time at the stump. I actually learned--so to speak--to cut there.

    Yeah, I'm not really sure what the locals got goin' on there. EVERYBODY's got like a 029 Farm Boss, and just about everybody has some conception of a face cut. It's the back cut that doesn't make any sense: they start about 18" above the face on the backside of the tree, and then cut nearly straight down--or rather at a diagonal--until they've achieved some kind of a hinge. I have speculated that the idea is somehow geared toward preventing a setback, though how this could be accomplished, I don't know. I've seen some incredibly weird stumps cutting permitted firewood in the Pecos National Forest, but I'll confess, none as weird as the one you happened across.

    I'll say this for Northern NM though: You haven't burned firewood till you've burned that stuff. I felled (normalish back cut) a 309 year old Doug Fir that was only 35" DBH. When the Vivash forest fire went through that place, in about 1999, it baked the pitch into those sticks so that you can still get up there and cut to this day, and there are still areas where there's hardly a hint of rot in them.

  4. #84
    forestryworks
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    Hey Jed... We go to Red River a lot. Almost every summer. I had my saws with me last year and got the itch to cut and went and dropped some doug-firs for firewood.


  5. #85
    TreeHouser Jed's Avatar
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    Thanks a ton FW. Really great shots. Makes me miss my Mom and Dad. It's really good to see some shots of someone falling in N.M. who actually knows to keep an eye on the top of the tree. Not a local custom. I had heard stories about some of the local boys going up to fall the Vivash forest fire sticks, and having the tops bust out and get flung back on em'. Not all that hard to believe.

  6. #86
    Old Schooler Sponsor gf beranek's Avatar
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    Beautiful scenery shot there, Jameson.

  7. #87
    forestryworks
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    Thanks fellas.

    My pops took most of those pictures. He still uses his old Olympus camera. Film. From the late 70's or early 80s that camera is.

    That second picture is at the top of Greenie Peak (11,250ft elev.), just north of Red River, NM.

    While falling the doug-firs, I remember he was having trouble finding good light. Clouds kept coming and going pretty quick that day. I need to get more of those pictures, only have a handful of them on my computer.


  8. #88
    Treehouser rfwoody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burnham View Post
    Jed, you may not be making any mistake in starting level. It could be improper technique in powering the saw through the back cut.

    It's very easy to push the bar off line as the kerf progresses if you are applying uneven pressure to the handles. Look at that aspect of how you are moving through the back cut, make sure you are gripping in a balanced manner and not above center of effort. If your grip and point of pressure on the powerhead is high, relative to the bar and kerf, you will push the bar into a lowering line through the back cut.

    With only a quarter inch of stump shot, it only takes a smidge of over-topped push to drive the bar under the far corner.
    I can't wait to try to be aware of this, and focus on this next time I get a chance to fall a tree.
    Last edited by rfwoody; 06-17-2017 at 03:48 PM. Reason: ha, I said *fell* a tree.. and it sounded funny, then I saw some of the guys saying *fall* and *faller* and it sounded better
    - Robert
    Quit city job... Now, slowly learning and doing in general direction of some kind of tree work.

  9. #89
    Woods walker Sponsor Burnham's Avatar
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    "Confidence is the feeling you sometimes have before you fully understand the situation."

  10. #90
    TreeHouser ruel's Avatar
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    What a bump!
    -Sean

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