Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37

Thread: Why do West Coast trees grow so much bigger then East Coast trees?

  1. #1
    JonnyHart
    Guest

    Default Why do West Coast trees grow so much bigger then East Coast trees?

    I doubt there is any single reason, but a multitude of environmental factors.
    I tried to google and wiki answers but didn't find enough to answer my question.

    Logging is going on in the North East, and is very profitable, with hardwoods and softwoods, but it really isn't worthy of the history channel, lol.

    IDK, I guess to narrow down the question; Douglas Fir grows well, right here in western NY, but it doesn't grow 200+ feet, even if it's an old tree. Why?

  2. #2
    Treehouser Cobleskill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Western New York near Lake Ontario
    Age
    58
    Posts
    2,734

    Default

    My guess is deep, well drained, mineral rich, well drained soil, and plenty of rain.

  3. #3
    JonnyHart
    Guest

    Default

    I bet that's a good part of it, but not all.
    I wonder if the logging practices here played a big role.
    And Hi Cobbleskill! I'm in Sanborn and if I recall right, you're a couple miles away, in Wilson?

  4. #4
    Treehouser Cobleskill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Western New York near Lake Ontario
    Age
    58
    Posts
    2,734

    Default

    You got it. Good to read ya.

  5. #5
    Tree Hugger Sponsor brendonv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oxford, Connecticut
    Age
    28
    Posts
    7,171

    Default

    I'dda thought moisture, and differences in seasons. Surely mineral availabilities, and other factors too.
    trees live a secret life only revealed to those that climb them -unknown

    "Today, me will live in the moment, unless it's unpleasant. In which case, me will eat a cookie". Cookie Monster

    "Be as nice as your dog thinks you are"

  6. #6
    JonnyHart
    Guest

    Default

    Yessir Brendon, I'm certain you are correct too.
    Differences in seasons for sure! The 4- 5 months per year of subzero temps must radically slow growth.

  7. #7
    TreeHouser Sponsor HolmenTree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Manitoba
    Age
    56
    Posts
    2,742

    Default

    The eastern seaboard had huge white pine, etc once , just that they were cut down hundreds of years before a axe cut old growth on the west coast and never had a chance to grow back. But trees on the east side never got a big as the wests since the last iceage anyways.
    Milder climate on the west coast, alot more moisture from the warm Pacific trapped by the high mountain ranges. Thousands of years of organic acidic mulch built up making perfect growing conditions for giant conifers.

    Willard.

  8. #8
    I dig hammocks. Sponsor Paul B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Burnaby BC
    Posts
    29,442

    Default

    short mild winters, looong spring,summer,fall. Lots of available water, mineral rich soils. That and the initial Canadians sing to the trees at night when we are all asleep.

    Ok, the last thing isn't true.
    Knowledge is power and its very light weight. - Cody Lundin

  9. #9
    Treehouser Sponsor Old Monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    394

    Default

    You can only draw water up so high with capillary/ osmotic pressure. To get taller you need to take some of your water in at the top through fog drip. Redwoods grow best in valleys and basins where it gets foggy in the summer months. The hot inland air rises up, pulling in the moist ocean air, causing fog in the summertime.

  10. #10
    Old Schooler Sponsor gf beranek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    God's country, North Coast
    Age
    65
    Posts
    17,046

    Default

    It's just an environmental thing.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •