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Thread: Resistograph

  1. #1
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    Default Resistograph

    I'm trying to do some research to find out what the demand is like for the Resistograph. How many people here even know what this thing is, and how many of you have used one? If you've used one, is it worth the money? Would you recommend it to somebody else?

    The manufacturer's website: http://www.imlusa.com/

  2. #2
    Brian
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    If a core part of your business is consulting and hazard tree evaluations then it maybe worth the cost.

    However, you will need some formal training.

    I think they (IML) rent and lease the units.

  3. #3
    Redneck Limey Sponsor TheTreeWiseMen's Avatar
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    I borrow a friend's/associate's when I need it. A useful bit of kit IMO. Doing a test with the client watching and then going over the results seems to work well. I attended a seminar run by Oliver Hein, and am now a certified Resistograph operator, for what it's worth. I know they ain't cheap though.....and be prepared to pull your hair out when you break that drill bit off in the tree! I was doing a test on an old linden the other week and the bloody sprinkler system came on when I had the drill in reverse with half the drill bit still in the tree.....got SOAKED. If you have clients that you can 'wow' and 'educate and inform' with a Resistograph then I would say, yep, buy one (if you have the $$ lying around).
    www.thetreewisemen.com

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  4. #4
    Wagnaw
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    They're pretty cool if you want to spend the 5,000 bucks. As far as being necessary... I don't think you NEED one to check out a tree. BUT, being able to show a customer the little graph is really cool. Chris Luley did a seminar on them where we all surveyed and compared the results from inspecting trees with a mallet, a regular small drill bit, and a resistograph. My take was that in the hands of someone who can use all three methods, the little piece of chart paper is the only real difference. ...which may be enough, I dunno...

  5. #5
    I dig hammocks. Sponsor Paul B's Avatar
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    I just bought an increment borer. I have found that over the last few years of doing a few reports here and there for hazard trees, it would have been useful. not to the tune of a few grand, yet, I dont have enough report writing business to justify it. But the resistograph and an air spade type tool are on my someday list, as I transition away from the physical labour parts of my job I think continuing in the consulting side is an attractive thing.

    We have many strong tree preservation bylaws locally so report writing will remain a decent business I think.

    on another note, does anyone here have a tree root (aka ground penetrating) radar unit? I got to run one here last winter at a seminar, what a wicked piece of kit that it! Horrifically expensive though.
    Knowledge is power and its very light weight. - Cody Lundin

  6. #6
    King of Splices Sponsor NickfromWI's Avatar
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    Bounce- I've seen them used before. I wish I owned one, but I don't do enough treework to justify using it. I don't know what they cost these days, but I have a feeling it's a little more than the $200 I WISH it cost!

    Is wesspur thinking about selling them?

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    Looking to have some custom splicing done? www.splicesbynick.com

  7. #7
    Old Schooler Sponsor gf beranek's Avatar
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    No need for that thing where I live. I can generally tell if a tree has rot in it just by looking at it. All the telltale signs is what I go on. Though I admit not being 100% in my calls. Though neither is the resistograph.

  8. #8
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    I went to a demo for this tool yesterday that was pretty interesting. We were testing a 68" dbh red oak, which is an usual size and species for this part of the world. It had several large conchs on the trunk at about knee level, but the canopy was lush and green. Also, it was in a city park. The city wanted to preserve it if possible (or at least delay cutting it down until the last possible moment), but also didn't want to leave the tree if there was a high chance it might fall and hurt somebody. Without the benifit of a tool like the Resistograph, it would be a judgement call and I hate to say it but probably a lot of arborists would simply recommend removal in order to limit thier own liability. I can definitely see the value of this machine.

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