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  • candoarms's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    candoarms replied to a thread Three Word Story in Odds and Ends
    I fixed it.
    245 replies | 4279 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    candoarms replied to a thread Duratech chippers?? in Gear Forum
    Here's a link to the Duratech TC-12 chipper. http://www.duratechindustries.net/dt/TC12.html Joel
    12 replies | 336 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    candoarms replied to a thread Duratech chippers?? in Gear Forum
    Duratech chippers are manufactured in Jamestown, North Dakota, at Haybuster's former manufacturing facility Duratech is located 120 miles from me. I've been to the plant and I've seen the TC-12 chipper in action. It's a good machine. I especially like the sensor in the infeed chute that detects the size of the incoming log and then opens the infeed wheels to the proper height to accept the incoming material. Hope this helps. Joel
    12 replies | 336 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    11-07-2017
    Good to hear from you Sylvia. All sites were ripped to about 3? to mark rows prior to planting. Cropping had been done for at least 15+ years with average yield for the area. All treatments following planting are identical. Only difference is cropped planting is 2 years older. Nancy says hi!
    14 replies | 831 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-25-2017
    Managed the same. In row weed control done same day Cooper was planted into pasture in 2011. Harrison in 2009 in corn/soybean ground. All trees on 7’ centers in 12’ rows. Only fertilizer was this past spring with 100#N. Urea About 1 mile north and 1 mile east of Aledo IL. On southwest corner
    14 replies | 831 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-24-2017
    No Jim. Just started working with company this spring. Just noticed a strong relationship between former crop land and pasture.
    14 replies | 831 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-24-2017
    Good to hear from you Dave. I am thinking that the younger field got a big boost from N supplied by micro organisms in the soil that was in pasture, which was not available in the cropped land since regular fertilizing had eliminated the need for these organisms to exist in sufficient numbers to react without the annual dose of nitrates and anhydrous ammonia. The younger field has had an extra month and a half or two months growth due to early leaf fall on the older site. This is my first year observing these fields, so I do not know if this has been an annual event although I suspect it has. Temp is about 45 hear today. I miss the Dakotas where this would just be a light jacket day and not a winter coat day. Dang humidity!!!!
    14 replies | 831 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-23-2017
    Here is the explanation of Haney Test. It won't let me attach a .docx file. Look up at wardlab.com
    14 replies | 831 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-23-2017
    As a few of you may know, I retired from the urban forestry side of things a couple of times and at age 70 decided to do what I originally studied in college in the 60's. I work for a forest management company that has several walnut plantations here in Illinois. It is interesting trying to recall what you learned that long ago and then filed away. This thread is a spin off from Jim and Dave's highly popular Sustainable Ag discussion. It deals with two fields, side by side, same soil type and fertilization regimen (100#N - 25#P aerial applied this past spring). The differences are that one was planted in 2009, the other in 2011 (hint: reverse the fields based on your first inclination), and one was in standard corn soybean crop rotation prior to planting while the other was a pasture with Osage Orange and multiflora rose cover that was bulldozed prior to planting. I had a Haney Soil Health evaluation done with samples taken from the grass area you can see in the two side by side photos. I did this to be sure that chemical applications in the tree rows and such would have less effect (I think). In the results, Cooper is the best looking site. I will also include a document on interpreting these tests. What do you think????
    14 replies | 831 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    08-24-2017
    Had the chance 2 weeks ago to visit my son in Alexandria, MN. They just bought a house and my grand daughter had a climbing tree she was anxious to show me. I took my gear and got in a climb and minor prune for my 51st year, in my 70th year. Also got son, daughter-in-law and both girls(8 and 10) in the tree for a while. Think we have 3 generations of climbers in the family now, but not all as a profession, yet! Will keep at it as long as I can and it is fun.
    210 replies | 9323 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    06-02-2017
    Underwor replied to a thread Frans in Announcements!!!
    Last time we met was in a Redwood tree. Helped with my bucket list. Hopefully he will show up again soon.
    37 replies | 1645 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    05-31-2017
    Willie, Just wait until you turn 70!!!!
    3446 replies | 63705 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    05-27-2017
    Just completed 50 years, only climbed a couple of times last year, none yet this year, but my daughter does have a good size hanger in her silver maple. I may get 51 years in the book soon. I still enjoy it, but the little stroke slowed me down last August. Think I have fully recovered except for being in good shape. By the way, I will turn 70 on July 1st.
    210 replies | 9323 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    04-30-2017
    Underwor replied to a thread Mike Rowe on TED in MBTV
    Just listened to this. I think this is required listening for everyone, arborist or any other person. Also I am old enough to know exactly what he is talking about with the lambs!!! As an community college/trade school educator, I fully recognize the problem with getting people into trade schools to learn the required skills for most of the jobs that are looking for workers at any level. Physical labor is not a dirty job or word. It is often easier to realize what you have accomplished after a large trim or removal than it is after you deliver a great lecture as a professor. Hopefully, in the long run I helped to create a person who is as passionate about doing the work as I was in exposing them to the finer points of doing it and recognizing the end effect of their work, even if it is 5 years down the road. Thanks for posting this and listening to my thoughts.
    11 replies | 534 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    04-17-2017
    The log splitting sessions with Alex Shigo in Portsmouth, NH were a great learning opportunity.
    18 replies | 1576 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    04-16-2017
    Spruce? One of those pictures I would have liked when I was teaching.
    18 replies | 1576 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    02-15-2017
    I charge 40 per hour, but only because winters in North Dakota are long and cold. I have nothing else to do, but haul in firewood. There's a dealer 40 miles from here who charges 45 per hour + a minimum shop fee. I've heard that his minimum fee is rather high, but I don't know exactly what it is. Joel
    24 replies | 1201 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-15-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Firewood in The Logging Forum
    Thanks a heap for the advice, guys. I have a free source for all of the steel I'll need for the project. A huge construction crew was in town building a massive grain handling system for the local grain elevator and they had PILES of left over scrap metal....some of it full length sticks. Our nearest scrap metal dealer is over 100 miles from here, so I told them that I'd gladly take it. Not only did they give me over 2 tons of scrap, they delivered it to my farm. I'll keep you folks posted as to the progress, but if anyone has any further advice or suggestions, please fire away. I'd rather change plans now, than have to rework all of these things later. Joel
    189 replies | 13119 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-15-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Firewood in The Logging Forum
    Raj, You're right about the welds. I plan on using 7018 rod and dozer cutting edge for the splitter section. I'm just curious to know if I'll be able to split a nasty elm, or ash round into 8 pieces with a single stroke from an 8" cylinder. It's not the end of the world if I'll only be able to split these rounds into quarters, but I'd really like to be able to take a 22" ash round and make 8 pieces of firewood in a single stroke. No matter what, this splitter is going to be a monster of a machine. It will be equipped with a log lift, auto cycle valve, adjustable splitting height, out-feed conveyor, trash separator, oil cooler, and towable. I'm thinking a 300 cu. in. Ford 6 cylinder inline engine, with a 3-section hydraulic pump will be able to handle all of the functions at the proper speeds. Building project begins in early March. I'll keep you folks posted with progress photos. Joel
    189 replies | 13119 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-14-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Firewood in The Logging Forum
    I'm wondering if anyone here has any experience with the commercial firewood processors. I'm in the process of building one that is designed specifically for handling oddball log lengths that will be supplied by tree care companies. So...it won't be a full firewood processor that handles long logs. Basically it will be nothing more than a GIANT log splitter. I see a number of videos showing how these machines can split a round into 8 pieces with one stroke, but all of the firewood shown is the easy-to-split stuff...birch for example. How about ash? Will these things split a nasty ash round into 8 pieces in a single stroke? I'm thinking about building something on the order of CRD Metalworks' Green Monster https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u10Djc3m1P4 My current plan is to use an 8" hydraulic cylinder that will produce 120,000 pounds of splitting force, coupled with a motor and pump unit capable of putting out about 60 gallons per minute at 2200 psi. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Joel
    189 replies | 13119 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Tire studs in Business Management
    Dozers and tanks don't like ice either. In fact, I've seen bulldozers slide right off the side of the trailer. For this reason, many operators haul their dozers on trailers decked with cottonwood. The cottonwood doesn't last long, but it's soft enough to allow the dozer tracks to sink into, providing loads of traction. I have heavy duty V-bar chains on my tractor and truck. Nothing better......but the chains limit my travel speeds to a max of 30 mph. Studs are far better for highway travel. I think the studs on your tracks will prove to be very good on ice. Hopefully you can remove them for summer use. Joel
    9 replies | 646 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Tire studs in Business Management
    Flushcut, Tire studs work great on ice. Not so good in snow. Let us know how you like 'em. Joel
    9 replies | 646 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Finally got a loader in Gear Forum
    Nice little machine. You'll be able to clear sidewalks in the winter, as well as move gravel and do other small landscaping projects. It will help you with tree planting chores....mulch, dirt, stakes, etc. Please keep us posted as you get more experience with the machine. If you don't mind, do you have the specs as far as engine make, horsepower, etc? Congratulations!! Joel
    95 replies | 6408 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Tire studs in Business Management
    Flushcut, Here in North Dakota the guys have two sets of tires for their vehicles....one set with studs. Our laws require that all studs and chains be removed by April 1st. When the pavement and asphalt begins to warm up, the studs will rip it up. Most guys around here don't have tracks....they use grousers. The regular skidsteer tires can be fitted with tracks.......like these Hope this helps. Joel
    9 replies | 646 view(s)
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About Underwor

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Avon, IL
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Retired, Park District Crew Leader, Online College instructor/Arborist

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Bob Underwood
Associate Professor Dakota College at Bottineau - Online
Underwood and Associates - Consultant and Speaker
Avon, IL

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