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  • Underwor's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Underwor replied to a thread Frans in Announcements!!!
    Last time we met was in a Redwood tree. Helped with my bucket list. Hopefully he will show up again soon.
    37 replies | 1050 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Just completed 50 years, only climbed a couple of times last year, none yet this year, but my daughter does have a good size hanger in her silver maple. I may get 51 years in the book soon. I still enjoy it, but the little stroke slowed me down last August. Think I have fully recovered except for being in good shape. By the way, I will turn 70 on July 1st.
    203 replies | 5460 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    04-30-2017
    Underwor replied to a thread Mike Rowe on TED in MBTV
    Just listened to this. I think this is required listening for everyone, arborist or any other person. Also I am old enough to know exactly what he is talking about with the lambs!!! As an community college/trade school educator, I fully recognize the problem with getting people into trade schools to learn the required skills for most of the jobs that are looking for workers at any level. Physical labor is not a dirty job or word. It is often easier to realize what you have accomplished after a large trim or removal than it is after you deliver a great lecture as a professor. Hopefully, in the long run I helped to create a person who is as passionate about doing the work as I was in exposing them to the finer points of doing it and recognizing the end effect of their work, even if it is 5 years down the road. Thanks for posting this and listening to my thoughts.
    11 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    04-17-2017
    The log splitting sessions with Alex Shigo in Portsmouth, NH were a great learning opportunity.
    18 replies | 1008 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    04-16-2017
    Spruce? One of those pictures I would have liked when I was teaching.
    18 replies | 1008 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    02-15-2017
    I charge 40 per hour, but only because winters in North Dakota are long and cold. I have nothing else to do, but haul in firewood. There's a dealer 40 miles from here who charges 45 per hour + a minimum shop fee. I've heard that his minimum fee is rather high, but I don't know exactly what it is. Joel
    24 replies | 834 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-15-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Firewood in The Logging Forum
    Thanks a heap for the advice, guys. I have a free source for all of the steel I'll need for the project. A huge construction crew was in town building a massive grain handling system for the local grain elevator and they had PILES of left over scrap metal....some of it full length sticks. Our nearest scrap metal dealer is over 100 miles from here, so I told them that I'd gladly take it. Not only did they give me over 2 tons of scrap, they delivered it to my farm. I'll keep you folks posted as to the progress, but if anyone has any further advice or suggestions, please fire away. I'd rather change plans now, than have to rework all of these things later. Joel
    131 replies | 6127 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-15-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Firewood in The Logging Forum
    Raj, You're right about the welds. I plan on using 7018 rod and dozer cutting edge for the splitter section. I'm just curious to know if I'll be able to split a nasty elm, or ash round into 8 pieces with a single stroke from an 8" cylinder. It's not the end of the world if I'll only be able to split these rounds into quarters, but I'd really like to be able to take a 22" ash round and make 8 pieces of firewood in a single stroke. No matter what, this splitter is going to be a monster of a machine. It will be equipped with a log lift, auto cycle valve, adjustable splitting height, out-feed conveyor, trash separator, oil cooler, and towable. I'm thinking a 300 cu. in. Ford 6 cylinder inline engine, with a 3-section hydraulic pump will be able to handle all of the functions at the proper speeds. Building project begins in early March. I'll keep you folks posted with progress photos. Joel
    131 replies | 6127 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-14-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Firewood in The Logging Forum
    I'm wondering if anyone here has any experience with the commercial firewood processors. I'm in the process of building one that is designed specifically for handling oddball log lengths that will be supplied by tree care companies. So...it won't be a full firewood processor that handles long logs. Basically it will be nothing more than a GIANT log splitter. I see a number of videos showing how these machines can split a round into 8 pieces with one stroke, but all of the firewood shown is the easy-to-split stuff...birch for example. How about ash? Will these things split a nasty ash round into 8 pieces in a single stroke? I'm thinking about building something on the order of CRD Metalworks' Green Monster https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u10Djc3m1P4 My current plan is to use an 8" hydraulic cylinder that will produce 120,000 pounds of splitting force, coupled with a motor and pump unit capable of putting out about 60 gallons per minute at 2200 psi. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Joel
    131 replies | 6127 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Tire studs in Business Management
    Dozers and tanks don't like ice either. In fact, I've seen bulldozers slide right off the side of the trailer. For this reason, many operators haul their dozers on trailers decked with cottonwood. The cottonwood doesn't last long, but it's soft enough to allow the dozer tracks to sink into, providing loads of traction. I have heavy duty V-bar chains on my tractor and truck. Nothing better......but the chains limit my travel speeds to a max of 30 mph. Studs are far better for highway travel. I think the studs on your tracks will prove to be very good on ice. Hopefully you can remove them for summer use. Joel
    9 replies | 386 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Tire studs in Business Management
    Flushcut, Tire studs work great on ice. Not so good in snow. Let us know how you like 'em. Joel
    9 replies | 386 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Finally got a loader in Gear Forum
    Nice little machine. You'll be able to clear sidewalks in the winter, as well as move gravel and do other small landscaping projects. It will help you with tree planting chores....mulch, dirt, stakes, etc. Please keep us posted as you get more experience with the machine. If you don't mind, do you have the specs as far as engine make, horsepower, etc? Congratulations!! Joel
    95 replies | 4415 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-11-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Tire studs in Business Management
    Flushcut, Here in North Dakota the guys have two sets of tires for their vehicles....one set with studs. Our laws require that all studs and chains be removed by April 1st. When the pavement and asphalt begins to warm up, the studs will rip it up. Most guys around here don't have tracks....they use grousers. The regular skidsteer tires can be fitted with tracks.......like these Hope this helps. Joel
    9 replies | 386 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-03-2016
    candoarms replied to a thread Coffee Break in Odds and Ends
    I enjoyed the video a whole lot. Thanks Gerry. Now I need to get one of those cow creamers for my lunch pail. LOL Joel
    67 replies | 2595 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-30-2016
    Mr. Beranek, You make a good point. A lag screw is nothing more than a round splitting wedge, if not installed properly. I sat through several classes in which videos were presented showing why medical equipment had fallen off of a wall and killed a patient. In many cases, lag bolts were used to secure the equipment to the studs in the wall. A forensic scientist was involved with these cases and his findings were very alarming. In a typical case, a steel plate was fastened to the wall with 6 lag screws. Three lag screws were placed in each stud, all in a line, one above the other, and about 6" apart. Improper installation techniques resulted in the studs splitting lengthwise for several feet. It didn't matter that the wall was constructed out of 2x8s. The problem was that the lag screws had been inserted into pilot holes that hadn't been drilled deep enough. The technician had used the proper diameter drill bit, but his bit was too SHORT for the job. It is important to drill the pilot hole to a depth that is deeper than the lag screw will travel. Joel
    43 replies | 2039 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    11-30-2016
    I would say a pear
    36 replies | 3171 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-30-2016
    True Cory. There are very few instances when the use of lubricants is frowned upon. Joel
    43 replies | 2039 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-30-2016
    August, In a wall stud, either bar soap or wax works well. In a live tree, I would probably go with natural bees wax. I have tried to find my old literature on lag bolts, but I was not able to find it today. Using a 1" lag bolt for ease of math, let's do this...... For every inch of diameter, there are 3.14" of circumference. This means that there is about 3" of inclined plane (Thread) being forced into the wood for every turn on the bolt. If there are two threads per inch of length, that comes out to about 6" of thread being forced into the wood for every inch of insertion. If the lag bolt is threaded 6" of its length, the length of inclined plane being inserted into the wood will be 3 times 2 times 6....or 36" of thread being forced into the wood. The friction on 36" of steel rubbing on the wood fibers can be very difficult to overcome, but it can also be very destructive to the wood. If not done properly....not using lubricants and going too fast......the wood itself can be torn, ripped, shredded, burned, or otherwise compromised. There is a whole lot of heat being generated as the lag is being turned in. This heat can be excessive. As the heat is being generated, the length and diameter of the lag screw increases. As the bolt cools, it will shrink in length, tearing the wood fibers even further. When installing multiple lags, alternate between them, making only a turn or two on each one before moving to another. This gives each lag bolt time to cool between operations. If wax is used as a lubricant, this will also keep the wax from thinning too much. Hope this helps. Joel
    43 replies | 2039 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-30-2016
    August, You're very welcome, my friend. Years ago I was employed as a medical equipment repairman. Needless to say, installing an x-ray unit onto a wood-framed wall was something of a concern. Years of use can cause the lag screws to loosen in the wood. Proper installation is critical for patient and hospital staff safety. I've received many hours of classroom time on the proper use and installation of lag screws. I'm passing along the most important aspects of this information because nobody wants to sit through hours of classes discussing fastening / hardware failures. Joel
    43 replies | 2039 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-30-2016
    A lag bolt can generate tons of friction when being installed. I've seen large lag bolts broken off due to improper installation. The wood must be drilled out to about 3/4 of the diameter of the lag screw. Only the bolt's threads should make contact with the wood. Bolts should be lubricated with wax or soap prior to being installed. Lag bolts should be allowed to cool while installing them. Using a drill or an air gun will generate tremendous amounts of heat, causing the metal to weaken during installation. All lag bolts will break if installed improperly. Please refer to the following chart when installing lag bolts...and lubricate your lags. http://www.portlandbolt.com/technical/lag-bolt-pilot-hole-diameters/ Joel
    43 replies | 2039 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-10-2016
    I'm also in favor of using a control line....or drift line. A small portawrap works well, but a munter hitch on a rigging carabiner will also serve the purpose. Joel
    17 replies | 781 view(s)
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About Underwor

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Retired, Park District Crew Leader, Online College instructor/Arborist

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Bob Underwood
Associate Professor Dakota College at Bottineau - Online
Underwood and Associates - Consultant and Speaker
Avon, IL

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