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  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Cold starting loader in Gear Forum
    I would be wondering why a gas engine is having problems in the cold. If you have compression, spark, and fuel it has to fire. Assuming it has the correct oil on it, not some super heavy diesel oil in it (I know people that run the same oil in everything) where it's not getting lubrication on start, I wouldn't hesitate to bump it with starting fluid because of the gas air mix being the likely culprit due to the cold problems only. Only thing I can think of is the carb isn't adjusted to run when very cold, or some condensation issue or something. A truck that might work if condensation is the issue would be a hair dryer in the intake. Very handy diesel engine trick, because a diesel requires heat from compression to run, so warming the intake air is a cheap way to get it because of the compression ratios. It might work here because it would warm the air to the carb, which is where I am guessing the problem is. Also I would add some sea foam to the tank, might help if water is an issue like this.
    22 replies | 316 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Automatic transmission fluid. I really don't see why hydraulic oil wouldn't work, but I haven't tried it. The key is the acetone, which cuts it so it penetrates
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    Some are bitter that they went to school for 8 years and their 300 k job that requires around the clock work and usually a 100k plus loan to pay off. American society claims that drs make tons of money and have life by the balls, but the reality is that they are cog in the wheel just like the rest of us.
    56916 replies | 1748283 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Sure thing. If he has any other questions about anything let me know :)
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Lol that too.
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    If you can cut them with a file, feel free to pour the heat to her. Files aren't very hard, so if the grinder shows high carbon, it's for toughness. Heat won't hurt it at all.
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    No typo. They are that much. Fit the biggest mining truck out there, Komatsu made in Peoria, and iirc, they are made in the same plant as the how it's made episode. They are laid up by hand, then placed in a giant mold and cure for several hours. They use a 100 ton crane just to move the molds around, absolutely huge. They say they get about two years of use, then they are junk. I choked when they said how much they were too lol
    56916 replies | 1748283 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Yeah just hack it if that's the case (and they are cheapish). The wax seeps in just like penetrating oil tries to, but I've found the wax follows rust like nothing I've ever used. I'll never buy penetrating oil again, especially after the 50 50 mix of acetone and atf fluid. Btw that's a cast part (or possibly forged), probably cast steel by the application. Tons of heat won't hurt it, because of the high manganese content. Same stuff they make excavator teeth out of. Never seize is your best friend putting stuff like that together, I tell apprentices that their entire pension fund is invested in never seize so apply accordingly lol
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    I'm pretty sure those tires new go for 250k +... I worked on where they made them. Bridgestone mining truck tires, pretty cool to watch how they make them.
    56916 replies | 1748283 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    A welding tip is very concentrated, enough to where you can get a bolt red hot, and then hold the wax on it. The other part will get warm, but not change color. With steel, color shows how hot it is. Furthermore, anything that's tapped will still be unhardened, because hardening could change the dimensions enough to where it won't meet tolerances. Works very well with cast iron and steel bolts, where overheating could crack the cast iron and ruin a much larger more expensive part. When I was rebuilding my welder, the head bolts were completely rusted in place. Cut the heads off the bolts in order to get the head off, which still took tons of effort (continental flat 4). Then I soaked the bolts in penetrating oil for a week, still nothing. Then I learned about the wax, welded nuts onto the bolts with a torch, then quenched the bottom with wax. Using a 3/8 rachet, they all broke easily and after a quarter turn, I backed them out by hand. Most amazing thing ever. It sounds like this wheel has pocket nuts tho, so on that case it's easier just to hack them apart.
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    With an oxy acetylene torch, you just use a welding tip to concentrate the heat. You will still heat up the surrounding material from doing this, but by using parrifin wax it's easier on the steel because during hardening process oil is normally used. You can check the type of steel by a quick grinding test. Take a grinder to mild steel, and you will notice sparks. Now take a grinder to hardened steel, like an old leaf spring. You will notice a ton more sparks, and the sparks will be brighter. Then try it on cast iron, and you will notice the sparks will actually explode in the air. This shows the level of carbon in the steel. Also try taking a file to it. If you can't scratch it with a file, it's hardened. If it's softer than a file, you know that the file is harder, so it hasn't been hardened. Using these two indicators you can tell exactly what you are dealing with. If you can't get a file there, use a chisel, it will show the same thing
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Since you are replacing the bolts, you will be fine. Water quenching can lead to cracking, but you are replacing it anyways.
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Lol I'm sure you've seen this Bob, but this kinda sums it up. Nws https://youtu.be/sTqVH6XxPFI
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    :) when it idles up that burp sound, ugh....:spermy: staggered brushes (300 brushes in the 2 and 7 o'clock position) apparently calms it down even more, and makes it even sweeter.
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Thanks Cory :) this is something I can actually help with :lol:
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    You need a torch set, a dc stick welder, and a couple grinders. Anything else it's just a nice addition. The torch can do just about everything, just not as fast as other stuff. Get 6" grinders, so you can use 6" cut off wheels, which work way better than the little small 4" ones. The reason I recommend stick welders is because they are more versatile and the smaller mig setups cannot compete. The only reason to use mig is for deposition rates (speed of welding) or for smaller stuff. However smaller stuff is easily welded with stick, and until you get to a full spray arc, mig is useless (except for small stuff). To hit spray arc heat, you need to be in the 250+ amps range, and you won't get that from a garage mig. Ironically, with proper rod selection, you would need to be using .045 dual shield wire at 300 amps plus to match what a 5/32" 7028 rod will lay down at 200 amps. Mig needs clean, scale free metal, stick doesn't care at all (still best to clean it tho). Stick will do cast iron, thicker al, all position steel (mig can too, but it's actually harder than stick out of position to do properly), arc gouge, and tig with a torch and argon bottle. You don't need a foot pedal and all that to tig weld steel and stainless.
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Al, I have a '71 sa200 too, thing welds so smooth I just clip a rod and bounce it off the pipe and it does the rest lol. Seriously, if any of you come across one of them going for a decent price, pick it up, you will not be disappointed. Grabbed mine from a junkyard for $500 while drunk looking for pontoons to build a party barge with one day years ago.
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Buy a Victor journeyman set. It will cost a little more than the cheap ones, but it will outlive you and possibly your offspring. The tips are cheaper than the Harris or Smith, and they are what you will find on every construction site in the continent. It is the most versatile tool I own, it can weld, braze, braze weld, heat, cut, gouge, clean surfaces, even fix a hangover by huffing oxygen (cutting oxygen is actually more pure than medical grade ;) ). The bottles are an easy way to get burned if you don't know what you are doing. The small bottles have their place, but I would strongly recommend against them. You will run out in the middle of what you are doing, and it will defeat the whole purpose of having your own setup. The rental contracts for the big ones are ridiculous, but most construction outfits use them without question, so they charge whatever they want. Contrary to what everyone will tell you, you can own the larger size bottles. The problem is that some air suppliers won't trade in. So you can drop them off and pick them up in a week or so filled. The testing is less than $20 every 7 years (watch this too), and some won't touch another company branded bottle. It's really a giant scam. The outfit around here that I originally bought my bottles from has a $20 per bottle maintenance fee, but then you can go there and they just swap them out. So you can see they are effin my eyes out. I'm planning on buying the biggest bottles they make, making sure that the neck cap is either blank or linde (older company that has touched every bottle out there it seems), and then waiting to have that bottle filled and returned to me. That will be the best way. Other than that I would try the tsc kinds, that way you can get them filled on a weekend. A plasma cutter will start to look inviting to you if you are looking into the total cost for a nice touch setup, but I'm going to advise against that as well. They do cut small stuff very well, but that is all they do. 1/4" will be a struggle with a homeowner plasma, and the tips are dramatically more expensive in time. It's a one trick pony, where a decent torch setup will do so much more. Welding is not difficult, but it's hard enough fighting your machine. With the exception of a handful of stick welders and some mid level plasma cutters, anything that runs on single phase power is going to be a toy. I'm sure some on here will attempt to disagree, but I do this for money, and stand by that statement. A generator style welder will be more versitile and powerful, for usually a lower cost (until you get into 3 phase machines, which go for relatively cheap because everyone is buying a garage model mig gun).
    72 replies | 955 view(s)
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About Tree09

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35
About Tree09
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Name is kyle. Steamfitter in peoria il, and own my own small tree service. Married with a daughter, cat and a dog.
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Peoria il
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Sailing, drinking, building stuff, playing guitar, and other random things.
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Steamfitter and tree service

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