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  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Hours Ago
    Cool hand Bob there. They wouldn't have made it even close to the house here.
    84 replies | 1273 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Hours Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Grove AT635E in Gear Forum
    I guess the points I was trying to make were this: 1. I know nothing of cranes and tree work, so therefore please ignore everything I say. I'm only saying this because I like you, and I'm repeating what I've been taught by people who actually know rigging and cranes. Several operators with decades of seat time running heavy lift crawler lattice booms, to decades of hydraulic crane operation. Riggers that are actually being asked by the international union to write training books on rigging. And other guys with decades of experience building large powerplants, foreman of rigging crews where tuggers are used to make cranes from the building frame to lift and drift pipes weighing tens of thousands of pounds. None of this is my info, this is what they made me learn. 2. The weight of the rigging has to be subtracted from the capacity. If the chart says you are good for 3000, but you have a 400 headache ball and 100 pounds of chain hanging, you can only lift 2500. 3. Making picks at 75% capacity or more is considered a critical lift. In construction, you cannot even attempt a critical lift without having a written pick plan, oftentimes reviewed by an engineer. Now tree work is obviously different, but picking that much is literally living on the edge. If anything goes wrong whatsoever, the crane is likely to tip or damage itself. If an outrigger has settled slightly or bleed down, if you aren't perfectly level, if the gibs are worn past spec (allowing the boom to deflect more than the angle finder is reading), if the slew bearing is showing its age, etc, you are in the red. Will the crane fail on that pick, probably no. But crane work is if you mess up once in 40 years you are remembered as that guy (hopefully still around). I guess what I'm trying to say is that per my experience and training, cranes are not meant to be pushed that far. Stay at 50%, make a few more picks, everything will last longer and be safer. 4. If you ever see a construction job where they are building a new building, and are setting steel (I beams, structural fabrications, etc), most times you will see them using an old school lattice boom crane. Sometimes it's for the reach, sometimes it's for pile driving or setting precast concrete sections, but usually it's there because setting steel is considered "duty cycle" work. They are setting one beam after another, all day, and production is a factor in everyone's mind (this is what tree work is like in my mind). This all day repetitive use is very hard on crane itself, so much so that it is worth it to them to bring another hydraulic crane out there to set up the lattice boom, and the associated trucking costs (multiple semi loads). The lattice boom is superior to the hydraulic crane in every way expect mobility and the ability to boom in or out for very tight spots (that should never happen in regular use, booming in or out under load is very hard on the gibs). Even though the sections of I beam are wayyyyyyyyyy under the capacity of the crane, the speed in which they are moved and the continuous movement makes it worthwhile to spend the time and money to set up a crane that can handle the abuse. Obviously a lattice boom is useless for tree work, but the duty cycle factor is enough reason alone to ease up on the pick size. 5. One more time, I know nothing of cranes and trees, but in good conscience I felt compelled to say something. If I was doing something you thought might be getting dangerous, I hope you would say something too. I could be, and probably am, overthinking this, but I feel better about it now lol. I like you, I wish you the best success, I only was speaking up because I want you to succeed and go home at the end of the day.
    692 replies | 39333 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Grove AT635E in Gear Forum
    Badass man, that takes some balls. If you aren't sure if your lmi is reading correct, call the outfit that does your inspections for you, they should easily take care of it or point you in the right direction. I'm clueless on crane assisted tree removals, but I'm fairly experienced in crane work. If the piece is 1700, you are good for 2400, but your rigging (chokers, headache ball) had to be added to that load weight as well. That puts the pick squarely into critical lift limits (75% capacity or more), plus potential shock loading or swinging too. Once again I know nothing of tree work and cranes, but to me personally, a calibrated lmi is vitally important when you are approaching critical lifts and pushing the envelope like that. I might be in the wrong here, and once again I'm definitely not critiquing anything, because I'm uneducated wholly in cranes/trees, but with the consequences so high, I would make sure that the lmi is on point. It would seem to me that since there is a dynamic element in just about any tree pick, and you can't put it back instantly if it's too much (unlike some construction picks), keeping under that 75% limit is a good practice. I almost had a 30 ton hydraulic crane flip over on me once (outriggers sank into asphalt despite pads), it literally happens so fast you don't have time to shit yourself.
    692 replies | 39333 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Open water swimming in The Rec Room
    You would have heard about my brutal murder on the radio too lol, she would probably Fargo me into the creek hahaha. That's hardcore man, congrats to both of you
    110 replies | 4240 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Open water swimming in The Rec Room
    Baddass Kevin. I was thinking of showing that to my wife (also preggers), but then I was thinking of the shark vs Phelps thing, and I decided against it...
    110 replies | 4240 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Lol another good one from around here a meth head stole a semi with an anhydrous tank. Drove it to a field that belonged to his uncle or something, where he had a prepared a small hill with a skid steer, where he then buried the truck and the trailer, leaving just the back open. The cops followed the tracker right to it, and waited till he came back to get some for his next batch lol
    84 replies | 1273 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Once I was foreman on a job where we had a ton of welding lead stolen. Like 500' worth. As I was filling out the stolen property report with the cat rental store (I know, surprise) I asked the guy what was the worse thing they had ever had stolen. He said in Cali they had a cat d10, complete with blade stolen overnight once. Lol now that is some next level stuff right there.
    84 replies | 1273 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread The RIP Thread... in Odds and Ends
    Sorry to hear that Dave, I used to occasionally jam with one of my uncles too, very special memories. Pass on the music to the next generation, and I'm sure you will feel his presence as you play.
    2292 replies | 135631 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Well said Sean, that was kinda what I was trying to say lol. He is a hired hand though, and I get a sense that he was pushed along into some of those things you mentioned. He obviously cares about tree work very much, he even takes time to make videos about it and learn from others. But I get the sense that the outfit he is working for is pushing production very hard without the personnel or equipment needed (he is using his own gear a bunch), or just has experienced guys who have gotten lax about the small details over time. If it was your business, would you let him climb or run jobs? He learned that way from someone is I guess my point. It seems like the owner is absent from the process, and has hired at a certain wage point and experience level. He was responsible for getting hurt, but his employer was just as responsible imho. There are many outfits out there operating on such luck rather than safety control.
    6067 replies | 408472 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread 50 years. in Announcements!!!
    That's so awesome Jim, congrats to them :)
    30 replies | 478 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Alright I'm gonna have to play devil's advocate here, poor guy already has a broken hip and had the balls to film that shit and put it up for everyone to understand his mistakes, no need to literally kick him when he's down. There are a lot more people like him (most of us when we started), he got a job at a tree service and they put him in the air before he knew everything that he should have. This forum is blessed with the very people that actually develop, test, and advance gear and cutting edge techniques, but most people who cut trees are trying to feed a family and haven't attained that level of mastery yet (me). If you watch his earlier videos, you can actually see the first tree that he ever climbed, and he did so at work with a chainsaw. That was roughly a year ago, and while his climbing skills have gotten much better, I bet he still hasn't been trained in rigging or anything else. He is self taught mainly (I'm basing that on the fact that about halfway through his videos he suddenly adopts advanced gear and stuff), as am I and probably more people here than would like to admit. I don't think he has a cavalier attitude towards safety, he has made mistakes and didn't know the risks. He was trying his best to do his job, but his employers didn't train him enough for him to do that safely. In my opinion and experience most people get hurt because they haven't learned the job fully. I personally have been very lucky, and I think most of us could look back and say the same thing. Murph, I admit that you have more experience than I will ever have, and I have learned tons from you from the stick trick to the snap cut for a back cut in order to get to safety before pulling a tree in a bad spot. But even you have experimented with stuff that is outside safe practices, the intentional barber chair thing comes to mind. No one is perfect, and tree work is very dangerous compared to some other lines of work. Every time we fire up a saw, we are betting our life that we have the knowledge and skill to survive the task. Everyone who is going to attempt this needs to understand the commitment level that tree work is. Most people who end up hurt don't understand the risks involved before it's too late. Tree work is very similar to pipefitting in that regard (my day job), people often know just enough to get themselves hurt or killed.
    6067 replies | 408472 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    I'm not nearly a good enough climber to even post here, but I think someone might like how I run the helical hitch. It's definitely not my idea, but I can't remember where I learned it from to cite the proper source. I came across it looking for a hitch to fit nicely under the rope wrench, but then ended up liking it so much I use it on everything. I don't use an eye to eye, and I don't run it off the tail like it is usually shown. I use a slip knot to make a cinching knot for the carbiner, then do how ever many wraps (rope and weight dependant obviously), then tie the bowline as close to the slip knot as possible. After you dress and set you then take the highest wrap and pull it over the knot, collapsing it into a vt like configuration. The best part of this knot is the fact that you can adjust the bowline to completely fine tune it, even in the tree (and it doesn't need eye splices). It is also very compact, so it will fit perfectly under the rope wrench, and doesn't have very much sit back. I use 7 wraps (collapsed to 6) on the poly core 8mm ap on blaze for tree climbing, and this picture shows a three strand lanyard that I use as a pipefitter when welding up in the air on pipe racks and such. Normally I get the bowline wayyyyyyyyyy closer to the slip knot, but this was working so beautifully that I have left it. Sorry about the messy background lol
    21 replies | 558 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    I don't have the actual grcs, but I have one that I made with a comparable non self tailing winch. One thing I like doing with mine on occasion is adding a block to the piece you are lifting, and leave the bitter end tied at the anchor point or at another anchor point, so that way you get double the purchase and can use different rigging points to get a better position or lower forces on the trunk. A tag line with a carbiner will allow you to retrieve the system with the ground guy pulling it back up too, and they can't screw you and accidentally run the rigging line thru the block that way either lol. I def don't use it often that way, but it's handy sometimes. You can also use it as the winch line on a derrick for loading stuff if you don't have hydraulic means to do so (and can get the truck to the tree easily), use the last bit of trunk as the column, use a porta wrap for the lifting of the spar (which you dont move under load unless to boom down), and use either a rope or a strap to choke the end of the spar to the trunk a few feet up. Works stupid good, especially with the drill attachment. I've rigged them up at work that way with a few chain falls and a chunk of pipe strapped to a beam or column, works so well I'm mad I didn't learn that trick sooner in my career. Saves a bunch of manual lifting stuff that you shouldn't have to do by hand
    9 replies | 256 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Can't say much about the smaller scale bass, but the smaller scale guitars are awesome. I had a buddy that had a smaller epiphone sg from the 70s, every time i picked it up i sounded wayyyyyyy better than i am because everything is so much easier and quicker. Your bends can go further, your fingerings are just that much quicker. Another super fast neck is a scalloped one, if you ever see one (very rare). A scalloped neck is where they sand out any extra wood off the fretboard in between the frets, so you never actually push down on the wood, you just gently touch the strings, and with super tight action you are there. Yngwie Malmsteen used to play one.
    721 replies | 24818 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    That is one comfortable dog :)
    2461 replies | 120525 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    07-02-2017
    Agreed. But for a rigging device at the base of a tree weight isn't an issue, in fact the only reason it would be aluminum would be for heat dissipation. You could incorporate cooling into a steel design, and that would eliminate glazing (cooling fins made from al on the inside of the pipe, water cooling, etc). From my experience of a pow, since they aren't lashed to the tree like a bollard is, so they slap the trunk just about every time you use them, which dents the soft al and causes work hardening, which in turn causes cracks. Al is a wonderful material, with lots of uses, however, in my humble opinion, is the wrong material to use for a pow. I've repaired several al objects in my life so far, just about all of them failed due to cyclical loading and work hardening far below what their breaking strength was. The grcs al bollard is massive, and with it being not anodized will wear out from abrasion before cycles to failure and the resulting work hardening cracking. I think that was intentional design. Proper design always takes into account the limitations of the material, and in the case of the grcs, I think the decision to not anodize the bollard was to require replacement before other more serious failure modes would occur.
    48 replies | 1477 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-30-2017
    Thanks. When al is heated, it gets softer, no matter the cooling rate. They heat it up after forming processes, which anneals it, allowing more forming (think a beer can for example). The plate that you can buy where the aluminum is very hard has been cold rolled, which are rollers that compress the sheet, hardening it. Once you weld it, the heat from welding anneals the area, making it softer. Stuff made from aluminum is usually oversized to account for the strength loss (in welded stuff).
    48 replies | 1477 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-29-2017
    I'm sure it's partly because I don't do it all the time, but I think climbing has to be if not the hardest, then definitely one of the hardest things physically to do as a job. Depending on the work, rest can be few and far between, and you use muscles that you didn't know existed, not to mention the heat and hardship of getting water (takes wayyyyyyyyyy more effort than just walking over and turning on a hose. Welcome to the house btw, if you want to pursue climbing, this is the place :)
    2748 replies | 178297 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-29-2017
    From a manufacturing standpoint, welds in al are weaker than the surrounding metal (opposite of steel), so al parts are usually machined from billet. This is dramatically more expensive than welding and forming from standard steel shapes. In the industrial world, you will never see any aluminum in rigging, it doesn't hold up, and since al is work hardened, every dent from it slapping the tree trunk would be a potential crack. The only rated aluminum I've ever seen as a fitter are rings on a harness (very expensive one for rope access work). While vastly superior for heat dissipation, it's strength issues and work hardening would make me leary of a pow. Bollard yes, pow no. While I'm a part time at best tree guy, I'm a fan of steel stuff, but then again my heavy lowering line of choice is treemaster 3 strand. :D.
    48 replies | 1477 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-15-2017
    Thx Reg, that helps. I'm gonna have to try that out soon :)
    18 replies | 583 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-15-2017
    Very nice, and thank you for explaining it. Quick question tho, does locking of the speedline first subject it to shock loads? Or is the control line taking the weight up first? In other words, do you tension the control line to take the weight, and then the speedline just guides it? That looked awesome and is a super useful technique, I just don't understand it fully yet. I've always been too scared to use a speedline for larger chucks because I thought there was shock loading and the angles caused huge loads on the rope, but understanding how to do it safely would be so awesome. :)
    18 replies | 583 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-05-2017
    That was awesome Cory, thank you for posting that
    300 replies | 12878 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-04-2017
    That is awesome Gary, thank you for sharing. Rigging derricks like that improvised one is true rigging, a skill that is quickly disappearing in modern times. Awesome use of the bamboo too, something you don't get to see everyday here in the states.
    24 replies | 625 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    06-04-2017
    The article seemed to have been written by someone who doesn't quite understand rigging or physics, even though they thought it was impressive that they could quote the basic force equation. They dead ended the line, which is a worst case scenario that needs to be addressed (for strength ratings), but doesn't actually do anyone any good because that's not proper usage of any rigging device. Adding friction in the tree is nice because it lowers the force on the trees structure, but by doing so it also loads a section of rope more severely than if a block was used because less rope is taking the load because some of the friction is in the tree. So we are back, as the article stated, to damaging the rope more. How much more is open to research (my bet would be not enough to care about if you retire gear as needed), but taking massive pieces because you can now control it does stress the rope more than if blocks were used. While I agree that more research could be done, the fact is that the article missed what it should have done because the author was clueless about rigging, rope wear, and physics. And history. With the exception of the rope wrench, everything covered is ancient technology. The 3 hole rigging thing is basically a rappel rack, the serial friction brake is literally just wraps on a bar, but the square thing is a good idea, which is why ships used square timbers for Samson posts, to decrease bending radius to allow for more friction. Rigging rings were called deadeyes (3 hole ones were common for tightening standing rigging, and looked like a skull) for as long as the English language has existed, and were used to be cheaper alternatives to blocks. Making them rope stropped isn't new either, because everything used to be made that way. Making them with al is new tho, but using them for trees isn't, Jerrys thimble is an example. These and other devices that can be used for partial friction will damage rope more than a block, but how much is the question that should have been asked. No mention of bending radius, no mention of abrasion, no mention of heat build up (well they mentioned that in passing, but didn't research it). Basically they just tested braking strength, which tells is nothing.
    358 replies | 25427 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-30-2017
    I was guessing arborplex as well... Can we get a pic of a freshly severed end? That would help to see how it's made. If it's arborplex it won't be a hollow braid, it's got a 3 as a core of I remember right. Not near the strength of amsteel, but decent low weight rigging line. Decent climb line too if you run a Blake's imo, but I wouldn't climb on craigslist rope. And welcome to the house!
    32 replies | 1587 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-15-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    Bars are awesome if you are single.... but I'm not anymore. Still if you live close enough for a cab or a dd you can have a good time if you got cash to burn. Kinda wish i had some of that cash back from my 20s lol.
    55471 replies | 1607512 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-08-2017
    You can crib under the pad logs too, the large flat surface really spreads the force out so it lowers the psi even more. Made me look smarter than i am once or twice :)
    6067 replies | 408472 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    I guess there is a huge problem with some white fungus that is decimating them across the country. I hope they get it figured out soon, they were going into caves and spraying some pesticide that helps. I think it was on vice news
    9180 replies | 436722 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    Working on the daily driver, fixing the Ford disease (leaf spring hangers). Nothing like smelling those damn rubber bushings burning. First time I've taken the bed off to do one, wayyyyyyy easier that way:big-bat:
    55471 replies | 1607512 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    Lol some women don't like it when guns, rodents, and houses mix :)
    9180 replies | 436722 view(s)
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About Tree09

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35
About Tree09
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Name is kyle. Steamfitter in peoria il, and own my own small tree service. Married with a daughter, cat and a dog.
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Peoria il
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Sailing, drinking, building stuff, playing guitar, and other random things.
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Steamfitter and tree service

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