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  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Thx Reg, that helps. I'm gonna have to try that out soon :)
    18 replies | 389 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Very nice, and thank you for explaining it. Quick question tho, does locking of the speedline first subject it to shock loads? Or is the control line taking the weight up first? In other words, do you tension the control line to take the weight, and then the speedline just guides it? That looked awesome and is a super useful technique, I just don't understand it fully yet. I've always been too scared to use a speedline for larger chucks because I thought there was shock loading and the angles caused huge loads on the rope, but understanding how to do it safely would be so awesome. :)
    18 replies | 389 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    That was awesome Cory, thank you for posting that
    227 replies | 9390 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    That is awesome Gary, thank you for sharing. Rigging derricks like that improvised one is true rigging, a skill that is quickly disappearing in modern times. Awesome use of the bamboo too, something you don't get to see everyday here in the states.
    24 replies | 463 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    The article seemed to have been written by someone who doesn't quite understand rigging or physics, even though they thought it was impressive that they could quote the basic force equation. They dead ended the line, which is a worst case scenario that needs to be addressed (for strength ratings), but doesn't actually do anyone any good because that's not proper usage of any rigging device. Adding friction in the tree is nice because it lowers the force on the trees structure, but by doing so it also loads a section of rope more severely than if a block was used because less rope is taking the load because some of the friction is in the tree. So we are back, as the article stated, to damaging the rope more. How much more is open to research (my bet would be not enough to care about if you retire gear as needed), but taking massive pieces because you can now control it does stress the rope more than if blocks were used. While I agree that more research could be done, the fact is that the article missed what it should have done because the author was clueless about rigging, rope wear, and physics. And history. With the exception of the rope wrench, everything covered is ancient technology. The 3 hole rigging thing is basically a rappel rack, the serial friction brake is literally just wraps on a bar, but the square thing is a good idea, which is why ships used square timbers for Samson posts, to decrease bending radius to allow for more friction. Rigging rings were called deadeyes (3 hole ones were common for tightening standing rigging, and looked like a skull) for as long as the English language has existed, and were used to be cheaper alternatives to blocks. Making them rope stropped isn't new either, because everything used to be made that way. Making them with al is new tho, but using them for trees isn't, Jerrys thimble is an example. These and other devices that can be used for partial friction will damage rope more than a block, but how much is the question that should have been asked. No mention of bending radius, no mention of abrasion, no mention of heat build up (well they mentioned that in passing, but didn't research it). Basically they just tested braking strength, which tells is nothing.
    358 replies | 24509 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I was guessing arborplex as well... Can we get a pic of a freshly severed end? That would help to see how it's made. If it's arborplex it won't be a hollow braid, it's got a 3 as a core of I remember right. Not near the strength of amsteel, but decent low weight rigging line. Decent climb line too if you run a Blake's imo, but I wouldn't climb on craigslist rope. And welcome to the house!
    32 replies | 1236 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-15-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    Bars are awesome if you are single.... but I'm not anymore. Still if you live close enough for a cab or a dd you can have a good time if you got cash to burn. Kinda wish i had some of that cash back from my 20s lol.
    54537 replies | 1558320 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-08-2017
    You can crib under the pad logs too, the large flat surface really spreads the force out so it lowers the psi even more. Made me look smarter than i am once or twice :)
    5967 replies | 388584 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    I guess there is a huge problem with some white fungus that is decimating them across the country. I hope they get it figured out soon, they were going into caves and spraying some pesticide that helps. I think it was on vice news
    9055 replies | 418900 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    Working on the daily driver, fixing the Ford disease (leaf spring hangers). Nothing like smelling those damn rubber bushings burning. First time I've taken the bed off to do one, wayyyyyyy easier that way:big-bat:
    54537 replies | 1558320 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    Lol some women don't like it when guns, rodents, and houses mix :)
    9055 replies | 418900 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    Hahahahhahahhaa bats are cool. My buddy down the street had a ton living in his attic, i remember i came over to help him on it (we rebuilt the whole damn thing), and all i hear is shotgun blasts. Well apparently he had been drinking already, and I find him standing on the attic joists with his 20 gauge thinking he could thin em out some hahaha. Good times, his sister went to stay with him once, bat woke her up in the middle of the night, he popped it with a 22 on the wall, she ran screaming out of the house and found somewhere else to stay. Lol that was back in our harder living days, hell if i tried to party like that now I'd probably drop dead and if i didn't, i would have to lay in bed for a week recovering.
    9055 replies | 418900 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-06-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    I'm gonna have to try both of those tricks. Got an oak in the back coming up that the truck will work perfect on, and i think i can pick up a pretty heavy duty lawn tractor for dirt cheap around here. I doubt my zero turn would work too well, even with the tire chains i bought for them.
    887 replies | 73063 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-05-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread Arborist Rigging Pistol in Gear Forum
    Lol that's awesome Butch!
    111 replies | 3090 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-05-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread Arborist Rigging Pistol in Gear Forum
    My cat disagrees. You don't get much cooler than this:
    111 replies | 3090 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-05-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    Ah yes Bob, the mighty grasshopper by sumner. You can move some rediculous size pipe with one of those, i made a small log arch to go into backyards with some wheels from harbor freight. Better wheels that are larger diameter would work much better, but on dirt you almost need more than man power. I often wonder how a riding mower would do pulling one of those and pulling an arbor trolley. Tongue weight isn't really there, it's a matter of traction. That might hold me over till i can get a mini or something. Anyone try that yet?
    887 replies | 73063 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-04-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread Who/what is Notch? in Odds and Ends
    I'm the same way Ray
    32 replies | 767 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-03-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread Who/what is Notch? in Odds and Ends
    Years ago people used to make their own stuff more often than now. Magazines like popular mechanics originally used to have articles on how to build stuff, now they are like consumer reports on random tools. Globalization and advances in manufacturing have drove the cost of stuff (and quality sometimes) so far down no one even considers doing it anymore. Back in the day everything cost more because it was made here by people making good wages with little automation, so people didn't buy shit they didn't really need. Now you can buy tools and stuff for almost nothing, but you usually get what you pay for. If you don't use it everyday, fine. But as i get older I'm starting to see that buying cheaper stuff usually isn't worth it, i would rather have stuff that will last til I'm dead. The thing that gets me is certain "advancements" in tooling is really just using old technology made with newer materials and manufacturing.
    32 replies | 767 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-03-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread Arborist Rigging Pistol in Gear Forum
    Ok, then use just the cheap rope and make a disposable loop right in the tree. So you need a small bag to have it in, or just an ironworker spool if you want to get fancy. Handsaw to cut it with. Or am i missing something?
    111 replies | 3090 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-03-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread Arborist Rigging Pistol in Gear Forum
    I understand the point, but wouldn't a loop runner around the wrist do the same thing with even less finger strain?
    111 replies | 3090 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    05-03-2017
    Tree09 replied to a thread Big hackberry in Tree Care and Health
    Don't be afraid to rent some equipment if you think it would help, either a lift if the tree is dead or the climbing/rigging would be too demanding/annoying (probably not this tree because you can just drop it or bomb limbs off it), or a loader. I would be tempted to check on dumpster costs or maybe even a dump truck running the larger trunk sections. I rent those tow behind lifts fairly often, occasionally a mini and a dump trailer. I also call my buddy to drop tubs or even just handle the cleanup because he has the gear. We both make money so it works out. If you know someone like that it might be good to sub part of it out to them.
    52 replies | 2396 view(s)
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About Tree09

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About Tree09
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Name is kyle. Steamfitter in peoria il, and own my own small tree service. Married with a daughter, cat and a dog.
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Peoria il
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Sailing, drinking, building stuff, playing guitar, and other random things.
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