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  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    4 Minutes Ago
    I thought it was something about all iPictures being turned to Landscape Format. no?
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    5 Minutes Ago
    SeanKroll replied to a thread Echo 340T 12" in The Trading Post
    Sent!
    9 replies | 118 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    SeanKroll replied to a thread Kenny Sanchez Videos in MBTV
    Snagging sucks, a broken rib, puncturing a lung, more than a time-wasting hassle. No stubs, win-win.
    45 replies | 1315 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    Mine always load correctly... Android phone.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    13 Hours Ago
    SeanKroll replied to a thread Kenny Sanchez Videos in MBTV
    Kenny, the stubs fight you way more with climbing than rigging. If you gaff out, those stubs will do damage to a person, if Murphy's Law kicks in. No Stubs! They slow you down. Use your climbing system below your lanyard. Without stubs, you will be able to just slide your systems down the stem. If you damage your lanyard, your full strength climbing system is good to go. You can cut just above your lanyard, and be safe...choking climbing system below. When you snap cut, you can easily cut from the far side, toward you, "back-chaining" with the top of the bar. When you cut your second cut, it MUST be below/ more inward to the first cut. This prevents saw snatch. When you push off the block away from you (strong position), your saw can stay in the snap cut. Lock your chain-brake, if you like. Hang the saw, if you like. Body at 6:00 position, dropzone at 12:00. Lifting and holding is a waste of energy, wear/ tear, and time. Lifting and twisting, no bueno for your back. Orient you choked climbing biner so the rope runs more to the spine side than the gate side. "Gate up" keeps the gate from pressing on the trunk. Keep on rocking and filming!
    45 replies | 1315 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    I have an articulating shear for my Stihl KombiSystem. Useful! With the nature of high-bank residences, I end up shearing the occasional tree for view. Western redcedars that are kept as bushes, basically, holding the bank. I shear a large western redcedar hedge for a friend. Peace Arch State Park has such a huge western redcedar hedge that we strapped the HT101/ shear attachment to the bucket (resting in the cradle) and drove along side it. Its just formal, ornamental landscape work. Not natural tree shapes. Not done under the guise of safety, or whatnot. Its using the qualities of the trees that they like, and maintaining them in size and shape by only cutting small wood, albeit internodally. The resulting growth is managed the next season. Small cuts, insignificant decay. Orchard pruning is antithetical to the normal growth of trees, but we work trees into doing what we want from them. Similar, in a way.
    29 replies | 426 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Simply use NEW POSTS. About the same.
    12 replies | 124 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    EZPZ. Something for some species for some circumstances...another tool in the tool bag.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    First example, neutral spar, or slight-moderate (not barberchair-type ) favorable lean. Second example, swing wood to overhead/ to-side rigging point, using a sapwood strap to hold-back/ 'butt-tie'. This was leaning on my birch example, so there was no pushing off the piece...gravity-activated. Third example, negative blocking. This cuts the force. Makes it easy to self-rig with Aerial friction (natural crotch, munter, top-side metal friction device). A person can just attach subsequent blocks with a midline knot (running Bowline on a bight, clove hitch with tie-off half-hitches on a bight). Groundie can be doing other independent work on ground while climber/ lift-operator finishes spar.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Sure. Give me a few minutes. Drawing pictures and taking a photograph is sometimes the easiest bet. 3 diagrams, another cup of coffee, coming up.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    SeanKroll replied to a thread Instagram in Odds and Ends
    #noappforthat hahahahaha
    229 replies | 6540 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Not quite. First step: deeper horizontal cut#1, Second Step: sloping cut meets the horizontal somewhere short of the depth of the horizontal cut #1. Third Step: horizontal Cut #2, below the height of Horizontal cut #1, from step 1. You aren't worrying about cutting off part of your hinge. You need to cut off all of it! I come in from the back toward the direction of the lay, fast. Your saw will be captured on the spar, no risk of saw snatch. Basically, you can cut Step 1 until you can see that its starting to set down on the saw a hair. Maybe 70-80% through. Doesn't have to be as much. Never caused me in problem. If you're working on hard-leaning piece, I'd put a sapwood kerf cut in the front, and use a Coos Bay. I'll peel wood into the rigging when I can, allowing the tree to use up energy breaking wood fibers, rather than a traditional facecut, sometimes. Birch, and probably cherry will hang on the bark. I did a bigger birch rig-down from multiple trunks, rigged on to the other, and back onto itself for the last, biggest trunk that was right over the dropzone. Steep driveway and steps, low voltage and keeper trees below, glass railing off to the side, and another birch. When I was cutting from one spar-rigged to another. I back-cut the tip-tied/ mid-tied pieces, let it hang between the bark on the butt, and the rope. When it was settled, I cut it free. The reduced the rigging force on the rope and rigging point, plus negated the need for an anti-swing tag line or butt-rigging line. With only one rigging line, plumb over the steep driveway, pieces naturally settled to where they were easily moved down open, steep concrete to the loading zone. As I was negative-blocking, rather than facing pieces, i cut 90-95% of the way through, then pushed it over. It hinged over on the strap, hanging next to the block, basically. Sucked up the slack and I cut the remaining fibers. Very little dropping or shock-loading. I had a mature japanese maple directly below, so I had less room to let it run, but didn't need to let it run.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Easy to practice on a small spar, where you can exit the stump area.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    SeanKroll replied to a thread Meanwhile in Russia in MBTV
    Keep people out of the work area that aren't involved in the work, workers and homeowners. When your ground worker was done winching up the load, he could have been much safer getting out in the open area near the camera.
    12 replies | 427 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Usually, most cuts will work fine on most rigging, on most trees. Academically, there are going to be differences, and Best Practices. Rotten trees, and big weights, etc... stacking odds in your favor adds up. Personally, I typically just pop in a humboldt, and call it good. When you're getting into dicey trees, keeping some energy-dampening limbs on the tree, rather than stripping the whole trunk on the way up to the topping cut, can be helpful. If you're on a slow-to-taper, forest p-pole, some limbs definitely are noticeable.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    If you were to be chunking down a spar(vertical or lean toward the lay), and can snap-cut the piece effectively (I'm envisioning a 2' diameter log chunk, 3-4' tall), tied to the side, you can snap-cut it, and wiggle it to the point where its balancing on the far edge of the spar, and tip it over. Snap cuts are really easy, fast, and effective. Fighting hinges with a pull rope is over-rated. If you cut a sniped-snapcut/ stepcut, AKA Gord's "magic cut" (say 2/3rd depth on a horizontal, then cut a humboldt snipe (full width dutchman/ bypass-cut to be politically correct), with a low back-cut release), then logs release themselves due to gravity/ undercutting the COG, without fighting a hinge, needing a pull rope, etc, while retaining the ability to aim it where you need it with the snipe. This is so much easier if you might be chunking down a bunch of spars at the same time right together (a grove of dog-hair conifers or co-dom, perhaps). You might be reaching a long way from the spar you're standing on, to another spar being cut. Nailing a facecut and hinge is important, because if you get part of the hinge you expect, it might swing the piece. With the Magic Cut, you know before the release cut that any hinge had been cut. I've used this on a 5'+ cottonwood spar, from hooks, no overhead support. Waaay easier to Magic-cut double-cut with the MS660/ 36" bar, than trying to fight a facecut and proper hinge (which, of course, has a critically important place). I probably bored the 'face-cut'/ sniped section in half. Since the hinge is cut through, and I used a humboldt, the 1/2 wedge was pretty ready to wiggle out, downhill and fall out.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Bird-beak, open face cut is supposed to be safer. Situationally dependent. Aerial face-cuts get overused a lot when roping. Face cuts give directional control. If you don't need directional control, its not needed, frequently.
    27 replies | 353 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    SeanKroll replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    This is true. Though, if you help them through it, it can build a good relationship. I responded to a guy's tree on house, recently. He was in Hawaii for another two weeks. Started talking about flying home. I told him to relax and enjoy Hawaii. We'd have it off the next day, and re-tarped, the roofers could get in by noon the next day if available. I told him its a 'fender bender' of trees on houses, the insurance will be fine, we will be fine, we'll keep the water damage out, the roofing contractor will handle it. EZPZ. He just called me last night to schedule an eval/ more work. You can be a hero. Sometimes, that branch you keep from splitting onto the house, and becoming a huge deal (and more profitable if it would become insurance work) will earn you the best advertising from a grateful customer. During major storms, where lots of people need you all at the same time...sucks, but profitable.
    57710 replies | 1818643 view(s)
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Olympia, WA

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If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.

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