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  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Sidenote: he gets paid up to $40K for a single speech at a conference. But we can listen to them for free online. What? Crazy...
    8 replies | 399 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Good day friends, today I want to talk to you about climbing and production tree work. Sound good? Ok, let's begin. Today you are going to learn the master key, the grand secret of tree work. This will probably change your life. Pay attention now, we're going to move fast. Here it is - Safety, safety, safety, safety, safety, safety. Safety! Safety. Safety, safety, safety. (Safety, safety). safety............. "Safety?" Safety! And just so we're clear... SAFETY! I hope you learned as much from that as I did. This concludes the lesson, carry on with your day. Climb safe, Work safe, Read safe. - TreeMuggs Meow let's all get out there and just be safe. OK? (sarcasm implied...) ----------- Wait. Let's start over. First of all, some definitions: Safe /sāf/ adjective 1. protected from or not exposed to danger or risk; 2. in other words, a utopian condition continually strived for, but impossible to attain, due to the nature of... reality. Safer, Safer-er, Safest, etc. /sāfər/ adjective 1. illusory and subjective concept with no endpoint; these terms are therefore to be defined as: undefined. Safety Police /'sāftē pəˈlēs/ noun 1. a small but vocal minority of people in this trade, usually (but not exclusively) encountered online, who feel the need to validate their own superior knowledge by continually pointing out how things could have been done "safer" and "safer-er". Unofficial Motto: "Nobody moves, nobody gets hurt". Context First of all, I work in the private sector. I run my own tree service. What little money I make from this enterprise helps to put food on the table. In other words, my production at work matters. I have to get stuff done to get paid. I can't take 2 1/2 days to get a tree down. We don't have guys with white hats standing around. I don't work for a city, or a municipality, or "hydro". If you do, mazel tov. I have more friends in the industry who have left the private sector than those who have stuck around. They leave for the better pay, the benefits, the pension, and all the other perks. I get why they leave. I don't hold it against them, and I'm not envious of their position. Why do I stick around in the private sector? I stick around because I value freedom more than security. Being my own boss affords me a freedom that my friends elsewhere simply don't have. I set my own schedule, I choose my own customers, I make my own way. I say all of that to give you some context for where I'm coming from. I may take a lot of flack for this article from the Safety Police and others in the "industry", but this is a subject that needs to be addressed. This is something that a whole lot of people think about, but it is politically incorrect to talk about. I care about safety as much as the next guy, but make no mistake, nobody cares more about your own personal safety than you do. What is Safety? I care as much about safety as the next guy. I want nothing more for myself or my employees than for all of us to be able to go home at the end of the day intact. But make no mistake, the reason that we all come to work each day is not to "be safe". Sorry if you've been told otherwise. No, the reason that we all come to work each day is to get shit done. I believe that safety in terms of a production arborist has a lot more to do with how you interact with others, rather than how you interact with yourself. Once you know the rules of the game, only you can define what is "safe" for yourself. If I'm on a ground crew and I get hit without warning by a big chunk of tree, what does it matter that the climber who sent it down was using 2 lanyards, both with a 540 wrap, and 2 climbing lines "for redundancy"? There is a strong correlation between a climber who exhibits good personal safety and also works hard in a team setting to watch out for other's safety. But correlation does not imply causation. Again, nobody cares more about your own personal safety than you do. Safe Enough I want to introduce a concept that seems to have been lost on most institutional teachers and trainers, as well as the infamous "safety police" that lurks online. That is the concept of "safe enough". We must make allowance for "safe enough" because things could ALWAYS be "safer" and "safer-er". If you are a trained and competent climber and you want to spur up a tree with just a lanyard and no climbing rope belay, then go ahead. I'm not going to put my Safety Police hat on and lecture you on how you could be "safer" or "safer-er". The important thing here is to be "trained and competent", and this means knowing the what-ifs, knowing what you are trying to avoid. You need to understand the rules and why they are there, before you can break them. As long as you know what a kickout is and how to avoid it by keeping your weight on the spurs and lanyard, then spurring with just a lanyard is "safe". Old-timers used to actually refer to their lanyard as their "safety" - i.e. the lanyard is what makes spurring safe. Would you be "safer" with a secondary, backup lanyard? Probably. Would you be "safer-er" by setting a climbing rope from the ground and belaying as you ascend? Yes, you would be. But just because you choose not to, that does not make spurring with just a lanyard "unsafe". Do you see the difference? The Safety Police would have you believe that if something is even a bit less than "safer-er" then it must be "unsafe". This is a false dichotomy, because climbing trees is inherently unsafe. At some point, there must exist a "safe enough". We must make allowance for "safe enough" because at the end of the day, we do actually need to get up there and get the work done. If the one and only situation in which we can say that we are really, truly safe is when we stay at home and lie in bed, then we have a serious problem. Not only that, but couldn't I argue that if you are "safe" at home in bed, you would be "safer" at home in bed with a helmet on? Wouldn't you be "safer-er" if you moved your bed down into the basement in case of tornado? What about hurricanes and floods? Raging wild fires? Bed bugs? ------ Safety is an illusion. You can NEVER be perfectly, well and truly safe. We are climbing living organisms, natural systems that could fail at any time, while swinging around on little nylon ropes with running chainsaws for God's sakes! This is not a safe thing to do! ------ Concept: Minimum Effective Dose (M.E.D.) The Safety Police are always obsessed with "safer", but what does that even mean? This is a game that has no endpoint. Water boils at 100?C (212?F) - that is the minimum effective dose for boiling water. At any given time, water is either boiled, or it isn't. Bringing water up to 150?C does not make it "more boiled". (Borrowed from "The 4-Hour Body" by Tim Ferriss.) When you work on a crew, safety is everybody's job. You need to work as a team: everybody looks out for everybody else. Does that make it a "safe" situation? No. Tree work is dangerous. Driving to work every morning is dangerous. But we still have to get to work. So, we apply the minimum effective dose of safety to our driving. - seatbelts, brakes, airbags, not texting, paying attention, etc. - would we be "safer" wearing helmets and full body harnesses like in Nascar? Yes, we would. Would we be "safer-er" if we never drove faster than 30 mph? Yes, we would. Could I keep going with this analogy? Yes, I could go on for quite some time. My point is, we have agreed on a certain base level of safety precautions, and at some point, we just have to put our faith in Providence, hop in the car, and get to work. Conclusion Please don't take any of this the wrong way. I am certainly not condoning any behaviors that we can all agree are unsafe. I simply need you to understand that tree work is not about safety. It's about work. Of course we strive for safety in the execution of our work, but the reason that we come to work is not to "be safe". Learn the rules of the game. Learn how to get the work done in the best and safest way possible. Just don't be delusional about why we do what we do. Going back to our driving analogy, we could argue on the interwebs about what is "safer-er" all day long, but arguing does not get us from point A to point B... driving does. Climb high, Work smart, Read more. Oh, also, be safe (seriously). - TreeMuggs
    28 replies | 562 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Kenny, I see you hustling all the time bro! Hell of a job. Check out Gary Vee's podcast, "The Gary Vee Audio Experience". His keynote speeches are the best.
    8 replies | 399 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    That's right, that's why these new big rings are so nice. Can't wait....
    17 replies | 236 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    I have a couple of these coming next week on ultra slings, looking forward to seeing them... I only got into rings in the past 6 months, now I can't do without! I was trained on natural crotch rigging, and that's still what I love, but rings open up so many other options.
    17 replies | 236 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    This is for all the nerds, like me, who are trying to make videos in 2018. Enjoy. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nLSUrTxquyE" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    1 replies | 102 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    I can't get over the moss and lichen that grows on these trees out on the west coast, it just looks so cool. Great video August. I miss my old 200T so bad.......
    3590 replies | 227039 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ucNTICgeKOw" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe> "Use the force Luke......"
    3590 replies | 227039 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread Climber Weight in Climbing Forum
    Stig, why do you give a shit if a fat guy wants to climb a tree? I don't get it. Nobody said that he wasn't overweight, we can all agree that he is, and he knows it as well. Fat guys climbing trees does not take anything away from Mr. Stig. "There are only two things I can't stand in this world. People who are intolerant of other people's cultures... and the Dutch." - from Austin Powers Oh, and I also have red hair..........
    125 replies | 2541 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread Climber Weight in Climbing Forum
    That 1_armed_arb guy is a beast! Seriously though, Treesplease, there is no reason these days that you can't get up into the canopy from time to time. Even 10 years ago, it was much more difficult to climb. Nowadays we have knee and foot ascenders and amazing stationary rope climbing systems that take a lot of the 'macho' out of the equation. Like everything in life, it comes down to mindset. You seem like you have a great attitude and a willingness to learn, you are more than halfway there! Will climbing be fun, or will it feel like work? Probably feel more like work. Just depends on the situation. Is it doable for you? Hell yeah! I'm really surprised by a lot of the responses on this thread, would have expected a lot more support... 'Service to others is the rent we pay for our room here on earth' - Muhammad Ali
    125 replies | 2541 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread Travelin' Man in MBTV
    It's a bad habit Mick, that's for sure.....
    15 replies | 527 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread Travelin' Man in MBTV
    Butch, the song was me and my buddy Scott, we recorded that back in 2007, nice to finally use it for something...
    15 replies | 527 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs started a thread Travelin' Man in MBTV
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/P-_ay0RvwFE" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    15 replies | 527 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-26-2017
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Thanks for sharing the link Sean.
    3590 replies | 227039 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-23-2017
    Bump! In case you haven't seen it, 'The Fundamentals' is back! Check out the thread here: The Fundamentals of General Tree Work - Digital Edition
    310 replies | 22164 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-22-2017
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Thoughts and prayers for Samurai Joe...
    3590 replies | 227039 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-21-2017
    Yessir, this project is 100% Jerry B. approved!
    17 replies | 1063 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-21-2017
    It's the steal of the century, an entire career's worth of knowledge for a pittance! Jerry B. is the man! Spread the word!
    17 replies | 1063 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-21-2017
    The Fundamentals of General Tree Work - Digital Edition by G.F. Beranek Here it is folks, the bible of tree work from the legend himself, G.F. 'Jerry' Beranek! Filled with over 200 photographs and illustrations, 'The Fundamentals' is the most comprehensive reference work in our field, and has been the go-to resource for professionals in the industry for over 20 years. Jerry Beranek's epic achievement in 500+ pages is undeniable proof that good books are worth their weight in gold. Simply put, if you work with trees, you need this book! "In 1978 I made a commitment to myself to write the Fundamentals. 18 years later, 1996, the book debuted at the Tree Care Industry Trade Show in Charlotte, North Carolina. 20 years later, 2016, it went out of print. In that 20 years the book has sold nearly 25,000 copies." Jerry Beranek - climber, timber faller, photographer, writer, worked for 18 years to produce this incredible resource, to pass along his knowledge to future generations. There simply is no more-complete reference work on tree climbing, cutting, rigging, and falling available! Sadly, his book went out of print in 2016. Physical copies are hard to come by these days - and very expensive. Enter...The Digital Edition! Presented here in PDF format, 'The Fundamentals of General Tree Work - Digital Edition' is perfect for viewing on laptops, smartphones, tablets, and e-readers, including the Kindle. Professionally scanned and processed with optical character recognition software, the Digital Edition looks amazing and is fully searchable. If you've been waiting to find a copy of 'The Fundamentals', wait no more! Check it out! The Fundamentals of General Tree Work - Digital Edition by G.F. Beranek, on EducatedClimber.com
    17 replies | 1063 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-14-2017
    One of my readers asked me to write something about my own personal philosophy of arboriculture. Intrigued by the idea, I decided to keep it short and sweet, since my philosophy is actually very simple: 'An arborist's career is centered around maintaining the health and beauty of trees.' In my opinion, our role as arborists is to be committed to all aspects of tree conservation, preservation, and environmental stewardship. I believe that the benefits of trees to the urban landscape are unmistakable, yet trees take so long to grow that they cannot simply be replaced if damaged or removed. I believe that any 'tree service' can cut trees down, but it takes a true professional to provide for the long-term health and well being of our cherished landscape trees. Our role as 'Green Industry' professionals is to help educate homeowners on how best to preserve and protect the natural heritage of our modern urban ecosystem. Since finishing my own apprenticeship, my business has been built around helping my customers make more informed decisions about their trees and landscape. Nowhere is this more evident than in my own commitment to helping customers visualize solutions to tree issues and being able to provide workable compromises to tree removal. Yes, sometimes trees will be need to be removed, but in my experience, pruning and other measures can often be used systematically to save trees from removal. In this way, we both, accomplish the goals of those involved, while also acting as good stewards of the urban environment, our natural heritage. Look, let's be honest. I do a lot of removals. That is just part of the trade. There is a very real concept of 'wrong tree, wrong place'. I get it. All I'm saying, is that our primary focus as professional arborists, ought to be on trimming and preservation, rather than on removals. There are untold numbers of 'tree guys' out there, who go around cutting trees down for cutthroat prices, with no consideration for the future of the neighborhoods that they operate in. But the reality is this: trees take an incredibly long time to grow. You can lose your entire lawn, call a sod guy, and within a few hours, you can have a brand new lawn. It just doesn't work that way with trees. Trees are a long-term investment. Trees are the elder statesmen of the urban landscape. They are unlike all man-made structures, and different than all of the other aspects of landscape design. Trees are unique, and they deserve our utmost respect and admiration. I love trees, but I'm not a tree-hugger. If you can understand that contradiction, then you can start to understand how I see our unique role in the community at large, both as professional arborists, and as business and thought leaders. So, there it is. Thoughts? Opinions? Let's continue the conversation.
    16 replies | 560 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    11-06-2017
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread EducatedClimber in Climbing Forum
    Thanks for the kind words everyone. The site is not about me, it is not ego-driven, I simply want to create an online resource where beginners can go and learn things the right way. As you can imagine, this idea is incredibly overwhelming. But, how do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. With that being said, I am always looking for guest contributors to the site. Just this morning I got permission to use Soren Sattelit's fantastic animated video on the basics of rigging. I'm sure many of you have already seen it on YouTube. I also have Professor Ed Gilman's amazing video lecture course on tree health, biology, structure, pruning, etc. I have no problem putting top-notch material up from other contributors. If anyone is interested in helping the cause, please email me directly at patrick@educatedclimber.com. Thanks TreeHouse!
    8 replies | 635 view(s)
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About CoreyYLTG

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About CoreyYLTG
Biography:
I pretend to do tree work well
Location:
Ohio
Interests:
Guns and Chainsaws
Occupation:
Tree work off a ladder.

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