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  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    My first thought was: let's see how many cuts she can make before she gets it pinched. Answer : 3
    7 replies | 200 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Agreed, great repair job to the fence! I personally wouldn't have tried to zipline those tops. The zipline is brilliant for the limbs, but when I get to the tops, I'm just gonna butt tie and rig them over, with a high tagline to pull them back over that fence. Not as elegant for sure, but guaranteed to work. Keep in mind that where I live, nothing is that tall, 100 footers are exceptionally large, so ziplining is not always a good option for the tops. Love this video August! Great stuff...
    3395 replies | 186618 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    August, this is definitely my favorite episode of the vlog series. You gotta take the high ground - the truth shall set you free. You are a scholar and a gentleman. Thank you for putting that together.
    3395 replies | 186618 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Anyone else on the TreeHouse follow GaryVee? He is a huge inspiration for me, constantly reminding me to hustle in business. Gary Vaynerchuk was born in the Soviet Union, in Belarus. His family emigrated to the US when he was 3. A born entrepreneur, he is a pioneer in online retailing, social media storytelling, and branding. Clients of his $100 million digital ad agency VanyerMedia include Fortune 500 companies such as General Electric, Anheuser-Busch, and PepsiCo. In addition to his business acumen, Gary is a highly sought-after public speaker, 4-time bestselling author, and an angel investor in dozens of Silicon Valley startups, including Facebook and Twitter. And in his spare time, Gary is a social media influencer with millions of followers, operating under the nickname GaryVee. In other words, Gary Vaynerchuk works harder than you and I do. This is an excerpt from my newest article: "Gary Vaynerchuk's 10 Rules of Success": 1. Hustle! As Gary Vee is fond of saying, “Hustle is the number-one controllable factor of personal success”. You might not be the best looking, or the smartest, or the strongest, but you CAN outwork your competition. As Napoleon Hill famously said, “Create a definite plan for carrying out your desire, and begin at once, whether you are ready or not, to put this plan into action.” Don’t have time? Get up earlier. Don’t play Call of Duty. Don’t veg out on Facebook. Time is not something to be ‘found’ – nobody ‘lost’ it. Time is something to be made. You will make time in your life to accomplish everything that matters to you. You can take that one to the bank. 2. Bet on your strengths. Triple down on what you’re good at and ignore the rest. Self-awareness is one of the keys to life. Since ancient times, the phrase “know thyself” has had a profoundly important meaning and role in the lives of people trying to better themselves. You can’t be good at everything. When I was young I often heard people use the term ‘jack of all trades, master of none’ in endearing terms, as if this was something to strive for. But in this modern world of information overload, that has all changed. The people who have the biggest impact and the most success these days are the ones who zero in with laser focus on one thing and become the best at it. Do you actually think that LeBron James gave a crap about organic chemistry? Know thyself. Don’t try to be something you’re not. Continue Reading on my blog (it's too long to post the whole thing here): www.educatedclimber.com/gary-vaynerchuks-10-rules-of-success Cheers,
    3 replies | 146 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Sorry, yes, I meant the 540. I have given this little saw so many chances, and it just doesn't impress me.
    26 replies | 746 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I love my 550 and 562, but my autotune 543 tophandle pisses me off daily. I am on my 3rd one and they have all been the same. Won't start worth a shit. I can be running it for a few minutes straight, then put it down for 2 minutes, then it either takes 4 pulls to start or might even need to be choked. WTF? I miss my old 200T so bad.
    26 replies | 746 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    August, I would have thought that you need to use a pulley up top to measure the weight of limbs? I'm probably over-thinking it. Cool video as always. You've got your mojo back!
    3395 replies | 186618 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Great thread! I actually tried the above several years ago. Most people thought I was crazy. I was just trying to encourage people to haggle more with me, instead of treating my quote as something that was set in stone so that they could call around and try to "beat" my quote. I am focused nowadays on trying to move out of the residential-work side of things. There is just too much competition in my area, everyone has forced the price of tree work down to poverty levels. I hate constantly hunting down new customers. I hate just scraping by. I'm trying to slowly build a roster of commercial and institutional clients with yearly work - golf courses, cemeteries, schools, churches, etc. I wrote up this thing called the integrated tree management plan, which is all based around us doing regular site visits and communicating with our clients about their own trees. Property managers have enough on their plates without having to worry about keeping an eye on all of their trees. Often times they miss issues for a long time that we would pick right up on, and then we don't end up getting called in until it's too late. So I want to flip things around and be more proactive, instead of just sitting around waiting for the phone to ring. It's a big experiment and I haven't actually sold it yet, I'm still working on a pitch and getting some more written material together. I'm not a natural born salesman so I really need to talk myself into knocking on doors and picking up the phone. But that's the plan anyway. Gotta put in the hustle. In regards to the law of attraction, that in itself is a fascinating concept, in a practical way, not a hocus pocus sort of way. I have seen it time after time in my own life. Two of the very first self-help books that I ever read were James Allen's "As A Man Thinketh", and Napoleon Hill's "Think and Grow Rich", both of which focus on this concept. Required reading in my opinion. I have read so many business books, but its the mindset stuff that seems to help the most. Fascinating idea about perceived scarcity, that is absolutely true. If there was a practical way to implement that into our regular business I would love to see the effect. But I have no idea how you could actually do that as standard operating procedure. I listened to a great podcast about the guys who invented Airbnb. They said that at the very beginning, everything was fine except for payments. People felt so awkward about handing over money to another person. That is when they tried moving all of the payments over to online, and it fixed the issue entirely. Running all of the payments through a trusted 3rd party made all of the difference. I have thought a lot about that in my own business. Even after doing a huge job for someone, it can still seem awkward at the end, when it comes time for money to exchange hands. I have accepted credit cards for years through my website but hardly anyone ever uses that option. Most people pay with cheques. I have had many people mention how weird it is for them to write me a cheque, they always say something like "you know, I haven't written a cheque in a couple years, I just don't use them anymore these days". And it's true, I don't really use cheques for anything in my own life either. What's the point of saying all that? Not sure. Just something that has been on my mind. Anyway, hope I'm not derailing here, I could ramble on for hours about this stuff. Peace.
    52 replies | 1316 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    08-01-2017
    Good for soil compaction that isn't typical in a natural setting. Normally people don't run 1,200+ pound zero turns through the forest. I do see it used as a fix all often, and it certainly won't help when soil quality isn't the issue. The cheap soil test kits on Amazon work well to determine if you have a candidate for a vert. Mulch when used with good visual diagnosis. As for a funnel we use sticks to get it in there.
    41 replies | 986 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-31-2017
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    August, this is your best video, thank you for sharing. Keeping it real. The guy I learned from one-handed everything, literally. I rope more than he does, but I still one-hand plenty. Trick is knowing when its ok and when its not. The industry brass can act like nobody one-hands, but reality is reality. Haters gonna hate, ain'ters gonna ain't
    3395 replies | 186618 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-30-2017
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    All that one-handing really takes me back, you put on a clinic August. That was good.
    3395 replies | 186618 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-26-2017
    It's on the way brother....
    53 replies | 1073 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-22-2017
    Sean, here was my thinking behind that price integrity guarantee. There were multiple cases where I ended up learning later that I had lost out on bids for just $50. I wanted something to encourage customers to negotiate a bit with me, rather than just taking my quote as being set in stone, take it or leave it. So I came up with this sentence: "We are able to beat most professional, written quotes for tree trimming by 5% - contact us for more details." On the surface it seems simplistic, but if you break it down there's actually a lot going on there. First of all it says "most", which puts me in the driver seat. There is no obligation on my part whatsoever to beat anyone else's price, after all, it only says "most". I get to choose when I honor this pledge. Next it says "professional, written quotes". This is so I'm not competing with all of the hacks in town, most of whom do not offer written quotes, or if they do, they are just scribbled on the back of a business card or something. Next it says "for tree trimming". I don't extend this to removals, which are usually far more work and involve bigger equipment. There is usually more wiggle room on my part for trimming jobs, which are my bread and butter. Lastly, it says "contact us for more details", which means that the customer has to be bold enough to call me back and ask me to honor this. Most customers never even take that step. I used this for a few years with underwhelming results. In 3 years, I only had a handful of people take advantage of it. At the end of the day, I was unimpressed with the concept, but I'm still glad I gave it a go. You don't know unless you try. These days I do most of my quoting by email, to build an email list of customers and contacts, which has been far more valuable than picking up an extra job here or there. The email form does not contain the price integrity guarantee. The other tactic that proved to be far better than a 5% discount, was just taking deposits. I don't usually ask for more than $50-100 for a deposit, but the difference to our cashflow is huge. And it helps big time to keep customers from going with someone else after the fact. But even if they do, that deposit is non-refundable. I know these issues have been beaten to death on the forums - beating other people's quotes, and taking deposits. Not looking for a big derail, just being honest about my experiences and opinions. If there's anything on the front or back of my quote sheet that anyone wants to use, I can also PM it to you as a Word document, so you can change anything you want.
    53 replies | 1073 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-21-2017
    I posted some of the written material that I use for my small business, including my subcontractor agreement, my quote sheet, the Integrated Tree Management Plan, and email scripts. If they can provide some value to anyone else trying to run a tree care operation then I am glad to help. Feel free to use them as starting points for your own needs, or you can just copy them straight-up, that's fine by me. You can check that stuff out here: Small Business Resources Peace,
    53 replies | 1073 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-17-2017
    Love hearing the saws. You should mount a camera on that ball cap! :lol:
    64 replies | 1974 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-12-2017
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread MunterWrench in MBTV
    I can't stand the way a figure 8 twists my rope up. Drives me nuts.
    5 replies | 181 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-12-2017
    TreeMuggs started a thread MunterWrench in MBTV
    This is an idea that my friend Joseph Duncan mentioned to me a while back, finally got around to trying it. At the end of a big removal, when you have it down to a spar and you have a tagline tied to it to pull it over, I like to bail out using a Munter. But the Munter requires both hands the whole time to operate. If you let go, you plummet. So the idea is to put your Rope Wrench on the rope above the Munter. It adds a whole new level of control to the Munter, you can actually let go of it completely and it holds you. Highly recommended. Check it out. <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/w1R9P22npvQ?ecver=2" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:50%;height:50%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div>
    5 replies | 181 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    07-08-2017
    I don't use file guides, tried 'em, didn't feel natural or something. Never felt like I could get underneath the tooth far enough. Anyway, to each his own. I can see that they would be valuable to a noob. I wrote an article for my apprentice James about sharpening, to help him starting from scratch. Might bring value to someone, took me long enough anyway. I'm not an expert, and I dont play one on the internet. Its just more info than you can fit in a forum post. You can find it here: https://www.educatedclimber.com/saw-chain-maintenance/ All the best,
    102 replies | 4430 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    06-21-2017
    TreeMuggs started a thread Double Rope SRT Climb in MBTV
    Tried this setup recently in a sketchbag Maple. Got the idea from Kevin Bingham. Definitely something to experiment with. Tell me what you think. <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UzyoFg7Kkzg?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:50%;height:50%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div>
    6 replies | 409 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    06-20-2017
    Submitted for discussion (this is a page from my website at https://www.educatedclimber.com/integrated-tree-management-plan-itm/) This is a concept that I came up with a long time ago (around 2010), but I didn’t really develop it until quite recently. This is a strategy and framework for selling tree care services to customers with large numbers of trees, primarily condo corps, golf courses, cemeteries, institutions, industrial and commercial outfits, etc. Our big push at ConservaTree Inc., as of 2017, is to move away from residential tree work, and move most of our resources towards working with B2B customers, with the idea of having fewer customers but larger projects. The ITM framework is the backbone of that business strategy. The idea for the Integrated Tree Management plan came from IPM – Integrated Pest Management, wherein you define monitoring schedules, thresholds, and control strategies for dealing with specific pests in the landscape. IPM is usually deployed in large-scale horticultural management situations, where you very-specifically define what you are trying to achieve in regards to insects and pests around valuable plant and nursery materials. In a similar fashion, Integrated Tree Management allows property managers and arborists to communicate a vision and shared goals for collections of trees. Using this framework, a formal management plan is drawn up between the tree care company and the property manager, ensuring that everyone knows what is expected of them. Rather than fuzzy ideas of what is trying to be achieved, the ITM concept allows for concretely defined standards and ongoing monitoring to ensure the health and vitality of cherished landscape trees, now and into the future. Integrated Tree Management Plan (ITM) As our name implies, ConservaTree is committed to all aspects of tree conservation, preservation, and environmental stewardship. The urban forest is about more than individual properties. It is about neighborhoods and the community as a whole. Trees take so long to grow – let’s protect what we’ve got! ConservaTree Inc. offers property managers the most comprehensive service, maintenance, and management program in the industry – the Integrated Tree Management Plan (ITM). Our Integrated Tree Management Plan begins with a thorough walk-through and site assessment by experienced and knowledgeable Certified Arborists. We strive to gain an understanding of your goals and vision of the future while addressing any ongoing concerns you may have. Our staff take the time to answer your questions and make recommendations tailored to the situation. Our aim is to assess the needs of the landscape, the community, and the property management team, working with you to identify problems and visualize solutions. Your management plan is designed to help achieve the highest degree of safety, utility, and aesthetic value of trees on site, helping to preserve their beauty for years to come. ConservaTree is here to help ensure that your trees are given the best care by qualified professionals. Your Integrated Tree Management Plan will address: Tree species: which trees are recommended vs. not recommended Site and soil conditions Health and Vitality Pests and Diseases Ongoing issues Planning for the future Services include: Twice yearly onsite monitoring and visual inspection 24/7 Emergency service Tree pruning, trimming, removal, fertilization, planting, consulting Adherence to modern safety and industry standards Traffic and pedestrian control to ensure the safety of the community At ConservaTree, we commit to treat every tree and every property as if they were our own. This includes giving honest advice and assessment, performing top-notch, quality tree work, and providing full and comprehensive cleanup as part of every job. From start to finish, we raise the bar for tree care, consulting, and customer service. That is our commitment and our pledge to you, our valued customers. ------------------------------- This is still a work in progress but I'm hoping it leads to new opportunities for my small company. What do you think?
    3 replies | 340 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    06-17-2017
    TreeMuggs started a thread Tag Team Climb in MBTV
    My apprentice James shows his chops in a big Silver Maple trim. I think this was his 5th climb ever. He's a quick learner. <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OOu68XDCEcM?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:50%;height:50%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div>
    2 replies | 198 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-26-2017
    That's a great saying. I am not an expert and I don't play one on the internet. And I have been very lucky to live through all of my many mistakes thus far. We have access to a 60ft spiderlift through a friend, so that's the size of lift that we were using. No, it was not ideal for this particular tree by any means, but it was still safer than climbing. This tree was sketchbag. This is one of the biggest cemeteries in the city, and they let stuff go way, way too long. But at the same time, they are our biggest client, so I couldn't just pass on the work. Yes, at the point that I had to make that final cut, I was way too invested to just pack it in and tell the guys that we would have to figure something else out. The area of the cemetery that we were working in was not soft ground by any means, there were no fresh graves. The ground was very solid. Soft ground is very scary with these new spiderlifts, definitely something to consider when setting them up. As far as the rigging is concerned, as a concept, I have always split the load between at least two spars. This concept however makes far more sense when the spars in question are at roughly 45 degree angles, so that they load in compression. The leader that broke in this case was basically vertical, which meant that it was being side-loaded. I should have been much more critical of that spar and done a much more thorough inspection before rigging off of it, but it had been supporting a live crown, so I figured it would be ok. For my first 3 years, I used natural crotch rigging almost exclusively, and yes, it makes more sense in a ton of situations. In this case where I was using pulleys, NOT splitting the load would actually have been much safer. Like most accidents, it was not just down to one single error, there were a whole bunch of things that I did wrong that compounded to produce that result. What I didn't explain very well at all in the video is that, in the moment, the thing that I was actually the most concerned about was that big hanger, which completely blinded me to the actual danger staring me in the face...
    40 replies | 1637 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-25-2017
    I'm the guy who is literally constantly having a conversation with myself in my head, thinking and analyzing something, so menial tasks are a great opportunity for solitude and thought. I love the chance to work by myself out in the garden. Joel Salatin is one of the smartest farmer-philosophers around, and one of my heroes. He is a guiding light for sustainable agriculture, real food, and healing the land using grass and pastured animals. For anyone wanting to learn more about him, I would start with his book: Folks, This Ain't Normal He has done multiple TED talks on this stuff as well. Check this one out: Can real food from real farms lead to real health?
    435 replies | 20297 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-24-2017
    Jerry, there was a squirrel's nest right where it broke, with 3 little gaffers all curled up. I should have inspected that stem much better than I did, but it was supporting a live top so I just assumed it was good enough. As far as the hanger is concerned, that really was my main worry in the moment, that's why I mentioned it before I made the cut. It's hard to tell in the video, but the butt end of that hanger was at least 15 feet above me. Very difficult to do anything about it. So much of it comes down to 'Normalcy Bias': “Normalcy bias causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster and its possible effects, because it causes people to have a bias to believe that things will always function the way things normally function. This may result in situations where people fail to adequately prepare.” That pretty much sums it up. I knew the top was bigger than what I would normally take, but that’s all I could reach with the lift. Do you know how many times I have done something similar when I'm in a lift? I end up cutting something bigger than what I am totally comfortable with, and, at least up until this incident, it has always worked out fine. It makes me question my own judgement in a way, like, if I was uncomfortable with it but it turned out fine, is it just that I have drawn the line in my head between what's safe and unsafe, in the wrong spot? You know, like can I actually take stuff far larger than what I first thought? I mean, you start thinking about tensile strength with the gear we use. When I was in school, we always talked about designing rigging systems with the rope as the weakest link. But I think, in reality, we have designed our gear to make the tree as the weakest link, in the majority of cases. For anyone wanting more detail, I have a more in-depth article about this incident, available at: https://www.educatedclimber.com/close-call-rigging-point-failure/ Thank you so much for opinions and analysis everyone. I am embarrassed to admit that, right when this happened, I was thinking, shit, I don't want to share this with anyone. This makes me look like an idiot. But later that night, I had made a 180, and I thought, first, much of the time, I am an idiot, and second, this is exactly what I need to share with the world. This is the kind of stuff that can help someone. So, like I said in the video, I'm actually glad that it happened. It was a real eye-opener. If this helps someone, sometime, to second guess a decision, or think critically about a setup, then I am so glad that this happened. Go small AND Go home.
    40 replies | 1637 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-24-2017
    3000 acres Jim? Wow. Are you a Joel Salatin-ite yet? He has some brilliant stuff.
    435 replies | 20297 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-23-2017
    . <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sNvwAU152BM?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:100%;height:100%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div> For context, read the full article here: https://www.educatedclimber.com/close-call-rigging-point-failure/ So, I wanted to hear from other professionals. What would you have done differently, or is it simply a case of "right to refuse"? Bottom line, I shouldn't have taken that top where I did. I knew it was too big right from the get-go, when I went up initially to set my blocks. I ignored my gut and made a huge mistake. But thankfully, nobody got hurt and I came away with a greater awareness of my own complacency as well as an excellent teaching video. So, any thoughts?
    40 replies | 1637 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-23-2017
    I didn't do anything to them, they just sat for 5 years in a pile, with fresh mulch piled on top. I had to scrape off the newer stuff to get at this black gold. I have a very good feeling about this stuff, it just makes so much sense to me, in a hindsight sort of way, you know?
    435 replies | 20297 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-23-2017
    Last year I grew pumpkins in wood chips and I was amazed with the results, so this year I converted my entire garden over to mulch. This is another big experiment for me, we'll see if it pays off. <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1CbqMmFw7Gk?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:50%;height:50%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div> This idea came from the Back to Eden documentary: <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6rPPUmStKQ4?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:50%;height:50%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div>
    435 replies | 20297 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-21-2017
    I can get 90% of my work around here done with a simple lineup: Tophandle - now it's a T540 with 12" bar (only because my MS200T blew up, I miss my old 200) Brush saw - 346XP / 550XP with 15" bar 2 Medium saws, 1 with 20" bar, 1 with 28" bar: either 575XP or 562XP We have a modded 395XP with up to a 36" bar for the big stuff. That's pretty much all I need around here. I'm not much of a gear nut, I just want the minimum effective dose of saws to get my stuff done.
    38 replies | 1622 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-08-2017
    Originally published in 1902, John Davey’s classic work helped to establish the scientific basis for the modern profession of ‘arborist’ or ‘tree surgeon’. John Davey believed that people’s neglect for trees was simply the result of a lack of understanding of their functioning, and that educating the public on proper tree care could benefit the entire country. This book laid down a foundation for tree care standards that would be adopted by his company, including proper finishing cuts, planting, timing, pests and diseases, and urban cultivation. John Davey’s study of tree stress, wounds, rot and decay was ahead of his time. Although many of his theories were later shown to be off-track, his contributions to the trade at the time were immense – he helped to pioneer an industry. John Davey died in 1923. His book is now in the public domain. Check it out here at EducatedClimber in PDF, with downloadable link. .
    1 replies | 166 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    05-07-2017
    It's a fantastic book, I love it (plus I'm a book nerd). I'm working on getting another great old book on the site, by a certain Mr. John Davey, whom you might have heard of..... Ted, I have a noose video on my site if you're interested, you can watch it here: EducatedClimber/knots It's about 2/3 down the page.
    8 replies | 325 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    05-06-2017
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Petzl Pantin Failure in Gear Forum
    I do use a zig zag but Petzl has a habit of barely building stuff. I use CT for most of that stuff.
    36 replies | 1118 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    05-05-2017
    The guy who designed the monkey Beaver is a member here. Looks like a good saddle but I haven't used it. For what it's worth I use a tree motion.
    67 replies | 2735 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    05-05-2017
    Monkey Beaver to the white courtesy phone. That's Monkey Beaver to the white courtesy phone.
    67 replies | 2735 view(s)
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I pretend to do tree work well
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Guns and Chainsaws
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Tree work off a ladder.

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