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  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    That's a great saying. I am not an expert and I don't play one on the internet. And I have been very lucky to live through all of my many mistakes thus far. We have access to a 60ft spiderlift through a friend, so that's the size of lift that we were using. No, it was not ideal for this particular tree by any means, but it was still safer than climbing. This tree was sketchbag. This is one of the biggest cemeteries in the city, and they let stuff go way, way too long. But at the same time, they are our biggest client, so I couldn't just pass on the work. Yes, at the point that I had to make that final cut, I was way too invested to just pack it in and tell the guys that we would have to figure something else out. The area of the cemetery that we were working in was not soft ground by any means, there were no fresh graves. The ground was very solid. Soft ground is very scary with these new spiderlifts, definitely something to consider when setting them up. As far as the rigging is concerned, as a concept, I have always split the load between at least two spars. This concept however makes far more sense when the spars in question are at roughly 45 degree angles, so that they load in compression. The leader that broke in this case was basically vertical, which meant that it was being side-loaded. I should have been much more critical of that spar and done a much more thorough inspection before rigging off of it, but it had been supporting a live crown, so I figured it would be ok. For my first 3 years, I used natural crotch rigging almost exclusively, and yes, it makes more sense in a ton of situations. In this case where I was using pulleys, NOT splitting the load would actually have been much safer. Like most accidents, it was not just down to one single error, there were a whole bunch of things that I did wrong that compounded to produce that result. What I didn't explain very well at all in the video is that, in the moment, the thing that I was actually the most concerned about was that big hanger, which completely blinded me to the actual danger staring me in the face...
    40 replies | 860 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    I'm the guy who is literally constantly having a conversation with myself in my head, thinking and analyzing something, so menial tasks are a great opportunity for solitude and thought. I love the chance to work by myself out in the garden. Joel Salatin is one of the smartest farmer-philosophers around, and one of my heroes. He is a guiding light for sustainable agriculture, real food, and healing the land using grass and pastured animals. For anyone wanting to learn more about him, I would start with his book: Folks, This Ain't Normal He has done multiple TED talks on this stuff as well. Check this one out: Can real food from real farms lead to real health?
    374 replies | 16190 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Jerry, there was a squirrel's nest right where it broke, with 3 little gaffers all curled up. I should have inspected that stem much better than I did, but it was supporting a live top so I just assumed it was good enough. As far as the hanger is concerned, that really was my main worry in the moment, that's why I mentioned it before I made the cut. It's hard to tell in the video, but the butt end of that hanger was at least 15 feet above me. Very difficult to do anything about it. So much of it comes down to 'Normalcy Bias': “Normalcy bias causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster and its possible effects, because it causes people to have a bias to believe that things will always function the way things normally function. This may result in situations where people fail to adequately prepare.” That pretty much sums it up. I knew the top was bigger than what I would normally take, but that’s all I could reach with the lift. Do you know how many times I have done something similar when I'm in a lift? I end up cutting something bigger than what I am totally comfortable with, and, at least up until this incident, it has always worked out fine. It makes me question my own judgement in a way, like, if I was uncomfortable with it but it turned out fine, is it just that I have drawn the line in my head between what's safe and unsafe, in the wrong spot? You know, like can I actually take stuff far larger than what I first thought? I mean, you start thinking about tensile strength with the gear we use. When I was in school, we always talked about designing rigging systems with the rope as the weakest link. But I think, in reality, we have designed our gear to make the tree as the weakest link, in the majority of cases. For anyone wanting more detail, I have a more in-depth article about this incident, available at: https://www.educatedclimber.com/close-call-rigging-point-failure/ Thank you so much for opinions and analysis everyone. I am embarrassed to admit that, right when this happened, I was thinking, shit, I don't want to share this with anyone. This makes me look like an idiot. But later that night, I had made a 180, and I thought, first, much of the time, I am an idiot, and second, this is exactly what I need to share with the world. This is the kind of stuff that can help someone. So, like I said in the video, I'm actually glad that it happened. It was a real eye-opener. If this helps someone, sometime, to second guess a decision, or think critically about a setup, then I am so glad that this happened. Go small AND Go home.
    40 replies | 860 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    3000 acres Jim? Wow. Are you a Joel Salatin-ite yet? He has some brilliant stuff.
    374 replies | 16190 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    . <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sNvwAU152BM?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:100%;height:100%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div> For context, read the full article here: https://www.educatedclimber.com/close-call-rigging-point-failure/ So, I wanted to hear from other professionals. What would you have done differently, or is it simply a case of "right to refuse"? Bottom line, I shouldn't have taken that top where I did. I knew it was too big right from the get-go, when I went up initially to set my blocks. I ignored my gut and made a huge mistake. But thankfully, nobody got hurt and I came away with a greater awareness of my own complacency as well as an excellent teaching video. So, any thoughts?
    40 replies | 860 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    I didn't do anything to them, they just sat for 5 years in a pile, with fresh mulch piled on top. I had to scrape off the newer stuff to get at this black gold. I have a very good feeling about this stuff, it just makes so much sense to me, in a hindsight sort of way, you know?
    374 replies | 16190 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Last year I grew pumpkins in wood chips and I was amazed with the results, so this year I converted my entire garden over to mulch. This is another big experiment for me, we'll see if it pays off. <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1CbqMmFw7Gk?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:50%;height:50%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div> This idea came from the Back to Eden documentary: <div style="position:relative;height:0;padding-bottom:56.25%"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6rPPUmStKQ4?ecver=2" width="320" height="180" frameborder="0" style="position:absolute;width:50%;height:50%;left:0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div>
    374 replies | 16190 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I can get 90% of my work around here done with a simple lineup: Tophandle - now it's a T540 with 12" bar (only because my MS200T blew up, I miss my old 200) Brush saw - 346XP / 550XP with 15" bar 2 Medium saws, 1 with 20" bar, 1 with 28" bar: either 575XP or 562XP We have a modded 395XP with up to a 36" bar for the big stuff. That's pretty much all I need around here. I'm not much of a gear nut, I just want the minimum effective dose of saws to get my stuff done.
    30 replies | 755 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Originally published in 1902, John Davey’s classic work helped to establish the scientific basis for the modern profession of ‘arborist’ or ‘tree surgeon’. John Davey believed that people’s neglect for trees was simply the result of a lack of understanding of their functioning, and that educating the public on proper tree care could benefit the entire country. This book laid down a foundation for tree care standards that would be adopted by his company, including proper finishing cuts, planting, timing, pests and diseases, and urban cultivation. John Davey’s study of tree stress, wounds, rot and decay was ahead of his time. Although many of his theories were later shown to be off-track, his contributions to the trade at the time were immense – he helped to pioneer an industry. John Davey died in 1923. His book is now in the public domain. Check it out here at EducatedClimber in PDF, with downloadable link. .
    1 replies | 107 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    It's a fantastic book, I love it (plus I'm a book nerd). I'm working on getting another great old book on the site, by a certain Mr. John Davey, whom you might have heard of..... Ted, I have a noose video on my site if you're interested, you can watch it here: EducatedClimber/knots It's about 2/3 down the page.
    8 replies | 201 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Petzl Pantin Failure in Gear Forum
    I do use a zig zag but Petzl has a habit of barely building stuff. I use CT for most of that stuff.
    36 replies | 858 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    The guy who designed the monkey Beaver is a member here. Looks like a good saddle but I haven't used it. For what it's worth I use a tree motion.
    55 replies | 1355 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Monkey Beaver to the white courtesy phone. That's Monkey Beaver to the white courtesy phone.
    55 replies | 1355 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Barshop in Gear Forum
    I don't think I have been more jealous. Awesome score!
    20 replies | 354 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Dangerous species in Climbing Forum
    Sycamore never bothered me until somebody told me it should. Now if I even get a sniff of it it's like I just tried to OD by snorting big lines of elmers glue off of a pile of metal shavings. Thanks Pat.
    68 replies | 1506 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Dangerous species in Climbing Forum
    Our WP here does have a very strong pole. The limbs are very snappy and don't peel unless you cut well into the collar. Most of the guys I know, including myself, that have been fouled up by them did it in the snow. Under snow load the limbs can explode when you spur them.
    68 replies | 1506 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Pelican Case Blues in Gear Forum
    I did that in the sand in Iraq with no issues. What got me was keeping it in a truck under a bunch of gear. I think the constant bumps shook sand into the valve over time. Ruined most of my porn and some whatever items uncle Sam owned. I had it backed up on a hard drive though so nothing important to national security was lost.
    8 replies | 184 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Dangerous species in Climbing Forum
    We do get decent sized Persimmons here in Ohio, but nothing like that for the most part. And yes, even healthy they seem prone to breakage. Ailanthus trees grow fast here, and then die young and leave a 100 foot tall heavy corpse that won't hinge and has poor shear strength even when healthy. Also worthless as wood or lumber as far as I know.
    68 replies | 1506 view(s)
  • CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    CoreyYLTG replied to a thread Dangerous species in Climbing Forum
    Ailanthus altissima.
    68 replies | 1506 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread Dangerous species in Climbing Forum
    Mulberries. Not really dangerous per se, they just piss me off. Dead elms and soft maples can be dangerous.
    68 replies | 1506 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    It's not the cert that annoys me, as much as the fact that it expires every 3 years. Am I really supposed to believe that arboriculture changes so much every 3 years that the knowledge I currently have will be outdated soon? Or is it just a brilliant business model? If I had stayed in university and finished my degree, would that expire every so often unless I paid a bunch of money to the school? The ISA CA program has only been around since 1992. Before that, the ISA was mostly an academic group, researching and promoting proper tree care. I'm not anti-ISA, but with the certification program that they started, in my opinion, they overstepped their bounds. Getting my Ontario certification was so much more difficult than getting my ISA, but I know, especially in the US, most states don't have a certification. And this power vacuum is why the CA program has been so popular. The certification has been packaged up and productized to the point that it is now virtually meaningless. Anyone can get it if you pay the money. If you want to get your ISA, you can get your ISA. But yes, it is a public perception thing. Even though certification is voluntary, we feel like we need to have it - we don't know what else to do. The bottom line in my mind is that your value, your social capital, is based on your output, not the letters after your name...
    56 replies | 1056 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread Homemade Charcoal in MBTV
    I love to bring it camping, takes up very little room in the truck, quick to get a cooking fire going. I give it away to friends too. Next year it will be all Sugar Maple, I have a special batch drying that will be just for charcoal.
    30 replies | 610 view(s)
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About CoreyYLTG

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About CoreyYLTG
Biography:
I pretend to do tree work well
Location:
Ohio
Interests:
Guns and Chainsaws
Occupation:
Tree work off a ladder.

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