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  • Nutball's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Guess I'll go to the dealer Monday if nobody has one by then. It's a poor condition saw to be getting an expensive ignition, but then I'm not the one paying for the repairs
    1 replies | 147 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I do the toe thing if I need full throttle, so one hand can hold the saw down while the other pulls. I forget about propping the bar on a log. Well look at that, my saw is ready for a full throttle start in my picture there
    16 replies | 641 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Anyone have a working ignition out of a broken 391 you'd sell? I can't find any on ebay, not even a $10 Chinese one. The Stihl dealer takes a week or so and costs more. I found the part number might be 1140 400 1303, but the broken module says 1140 1301
    1 replies | 147 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Thing about the 015 is you can tune it lean, so you can now create over lean all the way to over rich conditions using the choke for whatever the conditions. If I have to do a full throttle start on a big one, I used to jam my foot in the handle and use big toe to press the trigger, but boots don't fit.
    16 replies | 641 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Just what I want to hear, your 35 years of confirmation on this issue. You'd think that would be the first problem/solution in the trouble shoot list in the front of the manual to educate everyone, but we are all too smart to read a chainsaw manual because we might read something we already know. I had a 015 I used to use, the metal crank case with heatsink fin internal design (structural supports) in the gas tank quickly boiled it. That thing never stayed tuned right, but on the bright side it had a continuously adjustable choke allowing you to always "tune" it just right on the fly. I wonder if auto tune has vapor lock issues, probably does.
    16 replies | 641 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    This seems to be a pretty common issue at least in my experience. I used to rarely if ever run chainsaws in the hot summer because it is too hot to work. I do it more now and of course know others that do obviously because we all need work. Recently my echo 271t which would always start in two if not just one pull when warmed up now takes 5-10 pulls. Is it vapor lock, fuel nearly boiling in the lines or fizzing out when it enters the carb causing a lean mixture? For the first few pulls it doesn't fire at all, then sometimes it does that thing where you hit full throttle and it wants to die. I'll go to check to see if it ran out of gas to have the gas boil out all over. A guy I work with will give me a saw to fix complaining it doesn't run right and is hard to start. I usually have no trouble with it, and run it till it's hot without issues, give it back, and he says it runs great for 20min then doesn't start. Do you guys who work in hot locations have this much trouble with starting hot saws? What is the solution? Do you know of any chainsaw models that tend to have this problem more than others, or is it pretty much with any? The only thing that comes to mind is trying 100% gas 93 octane, and add a little diesel to hopefully increase the boiling point.
    16 replies | 641 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Did Husqvarna make them? That wasn't even broken in yet, it looked like 30 seconds through pine with 24" bar. Comparing to my 2188 which maybe on it's 5th tank of gas was cutting around 24"oak with 20" bar in just over 20 seconds, so they seem pretty close.
    38 replies | 1207 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I don't know about the dolmar, but my 2188 had almost all I wanted which is why I got it: Husqvarna 390 at a discount, outer rim sprocket, good power to weight ratio, I like the 3 setting oiler which does about either 1/3, 2/3, or >1 tank oil per tank of gas. Only down sides are parts availability, I wish it had an upgrade filter like the 372, bigger spikes would be nice, and it had trouble keeping a 42" bar oiled well, I'd say 32" max for decent oiling. I'd also like to see more heatsink surface area, it gets pretty hot, and the exhaust blows right up the handle which about burns my hand. I'm very happy with my 2188 and Echo 271t setup. The only thing that would be better is if they were ported and had light weight bars. I'd quickly get another 2188, I gave up a good 660 I had to get mine.
    38 replies | 1207 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I use Oregon files on all chains since I can find a good deal on a dozen box of them. I'll use definitely two new files on a 20" stihl chain that hits rock and needs 10-15 strokes of the file to get back to good material. I do it to maintain even sharpening, and it does eat up half the life of each file. I put them back in the box the other end up and will get back to them when I make it through the rest. I'm pretty quick at swapping chains since I do it so much, I do it to use the big bar for big wood only, then back to the little one to not wear out the big unnecessarily, or to switch chains for speed cutting or safe plunge cutting. It takes me a very long time to file even when I go fast compared to the time it takes to swap a chain. I don't go through chains fast enough to even think ahead by 10 chains let alone 50. I asked Frawley's saw shop about carrying Stihl chain, they said they'd look into it, so hopefully good deals come of that.
    33 replies | 1178 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I don't need to go buy a bunch of chain tools at this point, if I could afford it, then I'd just pay whatever chain costs. The next option would be for me to find a spool for a good price and hope someone local doesn't charge much to make the loops, but the only place I know spins rivets doesn't spin them down far enough, so they look like a cracked mushroom that I have to hammer the sides down on, so they don't dig into the wood as bad.
    33 replies | 1178 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread MS 200t problems in Chainsaws!
    There is some play on this saw, I don't know if it is enough to worry about. I can definitely pull the shaft back and forth, but when comparing to a ruler, at most there is a 1/3mm of movement if even that much, it's hard to tell, but nowhere near half a mm. To compare an old 290 and Husqvarna 455 both have absolutely no shaft movement, that or they are too hard to slide through the bearings.
    42 replies | 1228 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I know Bailey's has been off of my list of places to buy from unless I can't find something anywhere else because they are always more expensive. Their loops are a good bit more than some ebay sellers who sell at $0.30-0.33 per DL, and that's with ebay fees and paypal fees. Bailey's didn't have my size, their custom loops are $0.43/DL, their 100ft is about $0.31 before shipping and buying loop making tools. I'm sure a dealer could still make plenty of money not selling on ebay at $0.30/DL from multi chain orders.
    33 replies | 1178 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I got an old chinese junk chain I might try hardening, it is so soft you can't file it, the file just glides over the teeth sculpting them like clay, so there's a big curved lip bent over the cutting edge. I just don't know if Oregon chain could be made harder than it is, or if it softens as it gets used. I'll use softer chain if there's clean wood to be cut, but definitely not for a stump.
    33 replies | 1178 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I like to keep extra chains available, so I always have a sharp one if another goes dull, and so I don't have to spend time sharpening on the job. Also if I don't have time to sharpen at home before working again, I'll still have extras. What got me in search of more chains now is how although loggerchain.com has great deals on Oregon chain, and Oregon seems to stay sharper for longer than it used to, just recently I sharpened one on the job then almost finished 2 cuts in a 40" maple when it went very dull. Luckily I had a stihl chain still sharp enough to fell the tree, but it isn't a skip chain which I want for faster sharpening, and at the time I couldn't find any stihl skip chains in the size I needed, not to mention the very expensive price. Anyway, I was wondering if Oregon chains, and even cheaper and softer ones could be easily tempered with good results? Also, knowing some of you make your own loops, or might know who offers good prices on custom loops, I'm looking for Stihl RSF 3/8 .050: two 105dl and two 135dl for $150 shipped. From what I've seen on ebay and knowing how ebay charges a lot of fees, this should be a good reasonable offer at least to a business since they get their chains cheaper.
    33 replies | 1178 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread Teach me to cut fast in Chainsaws!
    My dad told me he heard filing to 0 degrees, or close to it, cuts faster than 30 degrees. Which is best? I assume 30 since most chains come filed to 25-30.
    45 replies | 1729 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread Teach me to cut fast in Chainsaws!
    I guess that's about the only other way to do it. That's what I'll do.
    45 replies | 1729 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread Teach me to cut fast in Chainsaws!
    How do you guy tune these things when they have a built in rev limiter? I have not done much tuning yet on this saw, but the only time I can get the 2 stroke lean sound is at around 1/3 throttle, otherwise it sounds like the rev limiter is cutting out the spark. Do you tune it in wood? The only problem with that other than safety is the screw driver shaking so much it is hard to get much precision work done before it is through the wood. Anyway, I fired it up for a few seconds without the cover on to blow out the metal shavings in the muffler after cutting some holes and although it was doing that cold start thing, which mine usually never does, where each time you try full throttle it almost dies, each time it tried to accelerate seemed like it was going to do it twice as fast as usual, so at least something improved. Oh, and it's loud even with earplugs... it was already loud with earplugs, but now I might need my ear muffs over ear plugs. I did a little mod to a friend's dying 455 too, so I have 2 to retune.
    45 replies | 1729 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread MS 200t problems in Chainsaws!
    The premixed canned stuff is way too expensive for me. I know I use 93 with 10% ethanol, but recently switched to 100% 93 from a Pure Gas station. The owner of the saw just told me he uses 87 with ethanol. I know he uses the cheap oil too, so did I and it works well, but when I went to 100% gas I searched for Klotz oil that would be best to use since I hate the smell of the cheap stuff and klotz smells good. I went with the super techniplate also, but it smells nowhere near as good as pure benol out of a nitro engine, benol smells good enough to drink. I'll still use super techniplate as good as it is. Where's the spark arrestor?
    42 replies | 1228 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread MS 200t problems in Chainsaws!
    I've gone to 100% 93, I doubt the guy who owns the saw does, who knows, he might not even use 93. I'll ask. I'd buy him some 100% 93.
    42 replies | 1228 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread Teach me to cut fast in Chainsaws!
    Time to start some power mods, I just can't resist. I want to start with the easy stuff and progress to the harder stuff. So far I've bent up the exhaust deflector some to increase flow as well as remove the spark screen. I was going to take the top cover off too adjust the carb needle limiters and remove the spark screen and sheered a t25 trying to undo one of the cover screws. Then after grinding the bit out with a carbide dremel bit I sheered a flat blade screw driver too. What a pain :X Now I need a new screw. Anyway, what are some good mods for a 390 muffler? And the big question is how do I need to tune it after opening up the muffler? That's why I went to increase the rich range on the needle. What got me going on this was remembering how RC Airplane gas engines have an empty can for a muffler, and a 60cc engine has nearly twice the diameter hole as a 90cc chainsaw muffler. Oh, and RC engines are usually rated at 1hp per 10cc's while chainsaws are around 2/3 of that.
    45 replies | 1729 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nutball replied to a thread MS 200t problems in Chainsaws!
    I thought about fuel lines in terms of clogging, but not in terms of air leaks, great idea, that would make it lean.
    42 replies | 1228 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nutball started a thread MS 200t problems in Chainsaws!
    A guy I work for wants me to fix his 200t, it's doing something two of his other saws occasionally do, and what two Husqvarna weedeaters my dad owns did 2 weeks after coming out of the shop from having the same problem. It only runs between half and full choke. What are the usual causes of such an issue? The air filter looks pretty dirty, so tuning it shouldn't be the right option since the dirty filter should already help richen it. Possible solutions I can think of: New gas filter New spark plug New diaphragm kit if carb cleaner and cleaning dust out of the vents doesn't help What other simple maintenance should I do on this saw? Keep in mind we're trying to save some money or it would go to the dealer. If I get it running well, are there any easy worth while modifications? I have not ever owned one before, but the exhaust area looks kind of weird, is the muffler on the side or bottom? If it is on the side, then it is missing half of the muffler.
    42 replies | 1228 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I forgot about spikes, my 271t doesn't even have plastic dogs, it sucks in that way but still chews through wood pretty well. It's about time I mod some of my stuff. I think there's a muffler mod for the 271t just like most any saw. I might take apart my 2188 soon if it isn't too much trouble, but hope to learn how to port it. I might also add some surface area to the cooling fins, that thing gets hot all over. A month ago I had a job through the night taking a blown over tree off a house. Now I just want to work at night, it's so much better in many ways, I'd think electric saws would be quiet enough if sound laws are the only limitation.
    38 replies | 1207 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Cool, thanks for the help. I thought as far back as it was cut that it would be rotten inside, but it could have been great mill wood at that size right? 4 tons of wet log there ranging from 28"-50"+, 15ft
    36 replies | 3101 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    05-19-2017
    I have no idea what this is. I guess it smells a little like hedge apple, but after finding the leaves might resemble elm (to me the bark and wood doesn't) I think I smell a tiny bit of elm in there, but many trees kind of smell the same in some ways. Seems like medium density wood. The wood in the branches is very white. The wood when fresh cut is a bright yellow orange, not as yellow as hedgeapple, oranger, but it quickly turns brown until it is a dark tan, medium to light brown (no pictures of the end color, just fresh cuts).
    36 replies | 3101 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    05-19-2017
    Poulan was my first too, I put a lot of use on it until I borrowed my dad's 359. That thing was like going from a clunker to a Rolls Royce, it was smooth like a knife through butter, the first time I experienced anti vibe. I'll make my question more specific by stating that I've already mentioned all that's needed to make my original question as specific as it needs to be, although I'm not always good at getting my thought across. Just tell me which saws you would choose based on experience and/or what you've heard about quality and performance and all that if you could only choose one small in tree (or on ground too) saw, one mid size, and one large, what would they be. Keep it on the newer side, very recently phased out models ok. Not a bad answer Bermy, I know my little Echo 271t is my all time favorite for branch work. I think that's why I like my two saws so much, I have one of the lightest, and one of the strongest which helps me to do pretty much any kind of cutting I need to quickly and easily. I just don't have a rescue saw in case the big one gets stuck in big wood and I forget taking it off the bar and putting another bar on is an option.
    38 replies | 1207 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    05-18-2017
    Nutball replied to a thread Teach me to cut fast in Chainsaws!
    What do you guy's do on a big bar? I got a 42" today, for tomorrow's job, I'm not touching the depth gauges due to the amount of power needed for such deep cutting. I'm using a skip chain though. I still file down my 32" a little since it has the power for it, and the time saved in cutting 30" logs faster is probably magnified by the longer single cut time in general. Come to think of it, I used my 32" skip chain for the first time 2 days ago with the depth gauges filed, and it went pretty quick for a log that big. I stared to outrun my wedge guy, but there was a good bit of rotten wood in that oak tree.
    45 replies | 1729 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    05-18-2017
    I knew those poulan jokes were coming, but I thought you guys would know better. I figured there could be some resistance to the question, though I'm not sure why, I just had a feeling. Anyway, I think it's a good valid question with new models coming out, and new models that have been around for a few years. Sometimes they have some bad production runs of them. All of the good brand name products should be good, but I'm looking for what stands out as being good or bad. Sometimes I think they have too many sizes to choose from which is why some people might favor a good model that runs reliably, is easy to service, and is a good balance between power and weight. I mentioned I liked the 372, but it is actually too heavy and weak for me to call outstanding. Maybe if it came stock with a big bore 76cc, and a faster flow oiler. The 359 had good power for the weight. A few tweaks to it's design and I'd call it outstanding. I liked Grendel's response. I'm sure the 880 is good, but I wouldn't buy one anyway, unnecessary price and weight...guess I don't need that power too. And what are the strato engines? x torque? autotune? I thought I read a while ago how people really like the 562, but I saw a lot of 2012-2015 (the only reviews I read) on Husqvarna's website that they had tuning issues and cylinder scoring problems.
    38 replies | 1207 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    05-18-2017
    Nutball replied to a thread Teach me to cut fast in Chainsaws!
    I don't use the guide because it doesn't go low enough for my liking, but I'd use it to even them up if I needed to, and they were long enough to use the guide. I don't think I'll do much more with the depth gauges past the first or second filing of them because they will definitely be low enough to last the rest of the cutter life without adjustment, and I don't trust myself to keep them even very far beyond one filing. I try to keep my saw to myself too because of the higher kickback, and I don't want my saw abused, different story if I'm the one abusing it, but I try to take care of my stuff so it works without time wasting problems. I wonder what the details were about that injury, just for learning. The closest I can remember to getting hit was when I was not expecting kickback. I was just running the saw near a log testing the oiler, gave it a rev and it went up and hit the wood and flew up. My wrist hit the brake, and lesson learned without pain.
    45 replies | 1729 view(s)
  • Nutball's Avatar
    05-17-2017
    Nutball replied to a thread New one in Chainsaws!
    Interesting ideas, I've always thought the umbilical setup is the way to go. Have the gas and oil on a belt or backpack, and an ultra light but big engine. Electric powered ones could be very good too if they knew how to make it as good as possible, but if they haven't perfected their gas saws after all of these years, they won't come close on the electrics. I was wanting to build an electric saw at one point in time, more work than I had time for. They get the most torque when they are under load at low rpm VS gas getting the most power at higher rpm. In terms of efficiency gas at full throttle not cutting burns about as much fuel as when cutting, but the energy is just wasted when not cutting. An electric motor uses what it needs, so at full throttle without cutting it barely uses any power, so it barely wastes any. But in the cut it will draw and put out a lot of power. Although not ideal to have no clutch, an electric would be harder to stall the chain in a cut than with a gas saw. A gas saw is also limited to a certain max continuous power output with no higher burst output while a well built electric motor the size of a coke can could do 3-5HP continuous, and short term peak 10-20HP for 5-30 seconds. The big issue is run time VS power output. Even though electric is more fuel efficient, the energy density of gas far outweighs the energy density of any available battery by like 50 times. That's why diesel electric is so popular because you get the energy density of diesel coupled with the efficiency of electric motors, and ideally a small battery too to store energy from an idling engine. I've always wanted to try a diesel saw. An unusual design I thought of a month ago was a diesel engine backpack with a hydraulic powered saw. Still it would suck to mess around with fuel/oil/hydraulic lines, but you could always have a quick connect no leak line system. Another design I'd like to see in big saws is a farther forward hanging front handle for better balance and control, and definitely a longer rear handle for more leverage, and diesel power. They could also fit a lot more gas in those handles, probably twice as much if done right, but then where would the extra oil go so you don't run out?
    70 replies | 1783 view(s)
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About Nutball

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About Nutball
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Mt. Juliet, TN
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Tree removal

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