• flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I originally meant a tag line to help swing the limb, not a rigging line tied above to support the weight of the limb. I can see where having BOTH would be very beneficial.
    41 replies | 991 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I imagine I will. Thanks Mick.
    17 replies | 413 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I think I will. Where do you guys usually decide to cut the top? A certain diameter? Small enough to redirect by hand?
    17 replies | 413 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    No fence anymore. I'm honestly just wanting to do it to do it. More of a curiosity thing than anything else. If I do it where I can't tear anything up I'll have an idea what to plan for when it's next to a house or over a dogwood tree that grandpa planted fifty years ago... I'm just getting a little more information about possible hazard that I'm not thinking about. It may be as easy as climb it and cut it. I wouldn't have known about half the hazards I know of now if I hadn't asked questions here.
    17 replies | 413 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Skwerl, I had thought of that as well. I'm getting fairly decent at figuring my balance points and getting the limbs to go where I want them. I think this situation would really be affected by where the rigging was placed as well, whether it was directly above or off to the side. That whole "Every action has an equal but opposite reaction" law definitely plays a large part in my work. Thanks for the tip.
    41 replies | 991 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Humor me... I had a lady get ahold of me about removing a 35' pine tree along her fence row. She's got twelve in total. A couple have died and been cut down already over the years. The pine is still green in places and brown in others and she'd rather have a hole than look at the tree dying. I can just drop it and dispose of it on the ground, but I thought I'd climb it and dismantle it because I've never done a pine like that before. (I'm new here, remember?) I've gotten into the habit of posting here before I do something safe and easy because in the past I've overlooked something or THINGS that could have easily killed me and I appreciate and respect the knowledge base here. Also, you guys aren't afraid to just tell me I'm an idiot for thinking about doing what I was thinking about doing. I figure there are two ways to go about it. The first is just start at the bottom with a couple lanyards and work my way up removing branches as I come to them until I get close enough to the top to take the top off. I'm picturing Butch's "S'cause me..." shirt on a far smaller scale. I don't think I'll need to rig it down, just notch, cut, and push since there's nothing below to hurt. The second way would be to throw a rope and basal anchor it and use the lanyard for a safety and positioning. Either way, it's climbing a tree. I think I can manage that. For the most part I think a handsaw will take care of most of the limbs. I've got nothing else planned for the day and I won't be in a hurry. I won't be by myself. Is there anything you guys can think of that I'm not? It really seems pretty straight forward. Famous last words...I know.
    17 replies | 413 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Butch, by "hinged it around" do you mean just starting your cut on the opposite side of the limb from where you want it to go and just cut through?
    41 replies | 991 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    41 replies | 991 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I figured it would be. No matter where your hinge ASKS the limb to go, gravity is TELLING it where it will go. I didn't know if there was way to coax it into doing something it didn't want to do as a whole instead of taking small bites. Once again, I was just asking to satisfy cutiousity more than anything. I don't plan on doing any work where I can actually damage anything. Next time I have an opportunity out in the open I may experiment on some small limbs just to see what they do.
    41 replies | 991 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I figured species would play a huge role in it. The ones I've noticed around here lately are Maple for the most part. Basically, I spot a tree while I'm driving and try to figure out how I'd cut a limb to clear whatever obstacle I see it above. Or, I try to figure out where the weight is in an odd shaped tree. I guess I always find myself wondering how to deal with a certain set of problems whether I actually have to deal with them or not. Apparently I get bored too easy... I DID try to find a copy of Fundamentals but had a hard time actually finding it in print.
    41 replies | 991 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Hi all. I've got a (hopefully) quick question for you all. If you've got a low limb that is above something you'd rather not hit (roof, fence, decorative tree, etc.), how do you handle it? Can you notch it on one side vertically and back cut the other and get it to swing some assuming you've got a rope tied out towards the tip? I don't have a need for a way to do it really as I don't take jobs that I think I might damage something (above my pay-grade as it were) but I've been wondering how you could get the limb to swing away before it drops. I know this is probably common knowledge to most of you, but I haven't seen it done. Would you back cut at an angle to leave more wood at the top of the hinge so it wouldn't just break the hinge from top to bottom? Thanks in advance. I'm looking forward to the replies.
    41 replies | 991 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-15-2017
    I've never had any trouble. I stuff a rag between the sling and edge of the receiver if there's a side pull and Ive never had any damage to my sling. My reciever is not oily. I keep it cleaned up with a wire brush along with the hitch slug.
    121 replies | 3025 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    121 replies | 3025 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-14-2017
    I have a 6' heavy lifting strap that I have used. 14,000# I believe. I tie a bowline through one loop. I pull the pin in the reciever, remove the hitch with ball and put it in the bed of the truck. Slide the other end of the strap into the receiver and slide the hitch pin through the loop of the strap.
    121 replies | 3025 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-14-2017
    My favorite so far was dropping a small pine into the corner of a fenced yard. I had had the fence within 20' or so on each side but the corner was 36' away. The "stick up to your eye" trick I learned here put the tip of the tree at 40' base to tip, so I cut it 4' off the ground with an open faced notch to hopefully keep it attached as long as possible and parked that darn thing right into the corner of the fence row. Tip was 6" from the corner post. Lady couldn't believe it. I shrugged my shoulders like I did it everyday. Sometimes it just works out the way you want it to...
    18 replies | 580 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    flashover604 replied to a thread Equipment care in Gear Forum
    http://www.vansicklepaint.com/ezslide/index.html
    13 replies | 360 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    flashover604 replied to a thread Equipment care in Gear Forum
    I think the soybean farmers around here use some sort of graphite for their gravity wagons to keep the beans from sticking to the sides. Might be a little dirty though? It's slick stuff though!
    13 replies | 360 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    It seems that parts are a little hard to find and therefore a little more expensive. If I go I'll check the oil, let it run and see if I get much blow-by on the rings.
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    After further review....it appears to be a 35 horse Wisconsin. Any opinions on the engine?
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    Is Wisconsin-ish good or "run away quickly."?
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    I understand what you're saying Mick. Right now I think a smaller chipper would suit me fine. I don't mind wheeling and dealing a little. I've made a decent amount of money haggling and reselling stuff. It's nice when I can get a little use out of it before peddling it down the road to see if it fits the work I do. I just like to get as much info on whatever I'm looking at so I can make an informed decision. I appreciate the advice.
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    Looking at the picture I see four plug wires so I'd imagine it's a four cylinder engine at least unless they're running two plugs per head, but they'd be spaced quite a ways apart.
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    I just messaged the owner to see if they know which engine is on it. I may go look at it. How should I go about checking the bearings? Spud bar underneath and see if there's any play? If I get it I imagine I should be able to sell it if it doesn't work out without losing too much on it.
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    Do you guys see anything glaringly wrong with it? It's 120 miles away. The guy with the Vermeer wanted $6500 for his.
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    Found a Bandit 65 I believe for $3200. No hour meter.
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
  • flashover604's Avatar
    08-10-2017
    Thanks. It's a pretty rare bird. 1982 CJ-8 Scrambler. They made 27,792 give or take between 81 and 85 with 200 or so sold as 86s. It's longer than the CJ-7. The nice thing is that almost everything interchanges with the 7, other than brake lines, rear driveshaft, etc... Makes it fairly inexpensive to maintain.
    103 replies | 2854 view(s)
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About flashover604

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About flashover604
Biography:
I'm a phone guy. Rarely make it above 18', even rarer to get there with gaffs. I got into Rec climbing after helping rescue a cat out of a red oak after a week of 0-10F nights. Working on a fear of heights.
Location:
Lancaster Ohio
Interests:
Motorcycles, Jeeps, old razors, gold prospecting
Occupation:
Telephone cable repair

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That which does not kill you...usually makes you wish it did.

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