• gf beranek's Avatar
    13 Hours Ago
    You gotta have something to grab. Half inch just doesn't cut it for extended use. Oh, I tried it, and it has its place.
    190 replies | 4180 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    13 Hours Ago
    Great documentation. and clean finish. A few wisdom's and new tools can improve the hourly rate much.
    17 replies | 152 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    14 Hours Ago
    gf beranek replied to a thread TreeStuff inventory? in Gear Forum
    Dropping, over the counter sales, is a bad move. My feeling about it anyway. I'm losing pace with the world, I guess.
    32 replies | 415 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    14 Hours Ago
    TreeMuggs replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Thoughts and prayers for Samurai Joe...
    3475 replies | 205182 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    14 Hours Ago
    gf beranek replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    So sad. Tough time to go through. Thoughts
    3475 replies | 205182 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Flipline and spurs. Old school still prevails in the Pacific Northwest today. Brutal tough to hike 200 feet taking limbs as you go. Brutal tough.
    190 replies | 4180 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    When Patrick and I started talking about all this, probably 7 months ago, I mentioned to the members that something was going on with the book. But I didn't say what. Well, yeah, here it is. Patrick did a mighty fine job, and I am most pleased. Thank you, Patrick!
    17 replies | 236 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Yessir, this project is 100% Jerry B. approved!
    17 replies | 236 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    It's the steal of the century, an entire career's worth of knowledge for a pittance! Jerry B. is the man! Spread the word!
    17 replies | 236 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    The Fundamentals of General Tree Work - Digital Edition by G.F. Beranek Here it is folks, the bible of tree work from the legend himself, G.F. 'Jerry' Beranek! Filled with over 200 photographs and illustrations, 'The Fundamentals' is the most comprehensive reference work in our field, and has been the go-to resource for professionals in the industry for over 20 years. Jerry Beranek's epic achievement in 500+ pages is undeniable proof that good books are worth their weight in gold. Simply put, if you work with trees, you need this book! "In 1978 I made a commitment to myself to write the Fundamentals. 18 years later, 1996, the book debuted at the Tree Care Industry Trade Show in Charlotte, North Carolina. 20 years later, 2016, it went out of print. In that 20 years the book has sold nearly 25,000 copies." Jerry Beranek - climber, timber faller, photographer, writer, worked for 18 years to produce this incredible resource, to pass along his knowledge to future generations. There simply is no more-complete reference work on tree climbing, cutting, rigging, and falling available! Sadly, his book went out of print in 2016. Physical copies are hard to come by these days - and very expensive. Enter...The Digital Edition! Presented here in PDF format, 'The Fundamentals of General Tree Work - Digital Edition' is perfect for viewing on laptops, smartphones, tablets, and e-readers, including the Kindle. Professionally scanned and processed with optical character recognition software, the Digital Edition looks amazing and is fully searchable. If you've been waiting to find a copy of 'The Fundamentals', wait no more! Check it out! The Fundamentals of General Tree Work - Digital Edition by G.F. Beranek, on EducatedClimber.com
    17 replies | 236 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Good stuff. Let's get the cameras charged up for the big fir. Videos are a PITA to make, and a distraction when you're trying to get on with the job (I know)....but it's much appreciated here:thumbup:
    190 replies | 4180 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Yeah, I looked again and you can clearly see pruning cuts around where you topped it. Yet the adjacent trees are full of deadwood along the way up. Wonder why the singled out that tree to prune :? Oh well, made your climb easier. What type and length is your climbline? I use windows movie maker. It's very basic, but it's all you really need to show a tree getting cut.
    190 replies | 4180 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Nice Eric. Still got plenty spring in your step :thumbup: Did you limb the tree first, set the climb line, then start the video where you're spurring back up ? Was somebody tending you climb line as you spurred back up ? Thanks
    190 replies | 4180 view(s)
  • Porkbrick's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Porkbrick replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    i voted for bolts in the end product. Rock Thompson was in favor of keeping the bolts. it basically boils down to liability and making the fasteners as tamper proof as possible. the guys in charge of that stuff get pretty nervous about having people taking stuff apart. when we first started negotiating way back i was expecting that they would go that way.i do like how sleek rivets will look and they are for sure stronger than a bolt of the same size. as far as servicing or parts replacement i look at it a few ways. for one, there is no reason to remove any of the bolts in the spine if the cams can be removed without doing so. for two the cams only need replacing if they last less than the safe lifespan of the tool and i think, with the adjust-ability of the akimbo and the right materials, they can last. as of right now we've made the cam axles of a design that allows the cams to be removed without disassembling the whole device. i doubt i will ever convince them to make it an end user replaceable part, but it will be replaceable. i obviously am a guy who likes tampering with his own gear, and i know there are lots of guys like me out there, but i can understand why it makes their legal dept very nervous when you start talking about tinkering.
    1148 replies | 78773 view(s)
  • Porkbrick's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Porkbrick replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    Chris, there has been some interest from that realm for sure. we'll have to see how well it jives with their safety standards.
    1148 replies | 78773 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    I'm going home Are contractions allowed
    129 replies | 1842 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Tree is down
    129 replies | 1842 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    YA... post some pics of your stumps (anybody) and we'll compare
    6 replies | 253 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Go, Frans, go.
    16 replies | 400 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    ANyone remember this thread started by Kenny in July 2002.. https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/dent-on-hinging.4451/ He was trying to explain a concept that you probably understand now if you've been paying attention to the forums... But back then it wasn't well understood outside of the logging world... He caught a ton of shit from small minded arbs that couldn't get out of their boxes.. I sure AM glad he kept at it anyway And pretty sure there are a bunch of people learning from the heated discussions that seem to follow many of my posts... I put $5,800 worth of locust trees on the ground today from two sets of the bucket in about 5 hours... I didn't do that by operating in a box..... the last tree I reduced from 2300 to 1800 because the little old lady who owned the house was on a fixed income and she asked nicely.. Her son in law told me she got a price of 2,700 six years ago... Tree as on the ground in a little over an hour... If you look closely you can see the tree ended up falling left of the hinge, that top was one big heavy locust lead hanging over the house
    6 replies | 253 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Agreed, Kenny you have been my teacher and pried open a heavy door to allow a few rays of light through which has become a whole new world for me, full of beauty and wonder. I will always be grateful to you for the effort you made to show us a new perspective when this industry was so stuck in first gear..... In the end tree work, like martial arts, should be an expression of truth.. To do it well you must ask the question "who AM I?" To answer that question we all must look at the assumptions that we consider to be true. Begin to question everything in your life... And in the way you do tree work.. Why to you use a humboldt., why do you cut a notch as deep and wide as you do?: why do you rig and rope the way you do... You may find that the answer to many of these questions is because that's the way you were taught or that's the way I've always done it.. Or I never thought about it, just seems to work so why change ... etc... I call that inside the box .... For me the juice is always outside the box.... I love it out here!
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    of course, which can be A LOT and often then ends up in the back cut being over-cut and as soon as it bypasses the notch the weight of the tree crushed the no-existent hinge and sits on the bar and traps it.
    298 replies | 28044 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CgCdsERkqrc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> Knowledge is the tool box for creativity.... If you don't fully understand the basics, how are you going to transcend them..
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • Porkbrick's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Porkbrick replied to a thread Swivel on bridge? in Climbing Forum
    i use the RE hydra swivel pulley on my bridge. it was supplied for me at work. im not really a fan of having a swivel on my bridge but i love having the three attachments. the pulley make it much less abrasive on the bridge than a paw or similar. im kind of getting used to the swivel part and liking it more and more.
    22 replies | 678 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I concur.
    16 replies | 400 view(s)
  • TreeMuggs's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    One of my readers asked me to write something about my own personal philosophy of arboriculture. Intrigued by the idea, I decided to keep it short and sweet, since my philosophy is actually very simple: 'An arborist's career is centered around maintaining the health and beauty of trees.' In my opinion, our role as arborists is to be committed to all aspects of tree conservation, preservation, and environmental stewardship. I believe that the benefits of trees to the urban landscape are unmistakable, yet trees take so long to grow that they cannot simply be replaced if damaged or removed. I believe that any 'tree service' can cut trees down, but it takes a true professional to provide for the long-term health and well being of our cherished landscape trees. Our role as 'Green Industry' professionals is to help educate homeowners on how best to preserve and protect the natural heritage of our modern urban ecosystem. Since finishing my own apprenticeship, my business has been built around helping my customers make more informed decisions about their trees and landscape. Nowhere is this more evident than in my own commitment to helping customers visualize solutions to tree issues and being able to provide workable compromises to tree removal. Yes, sometimes trees will be need to be removed, but in my experience, pruning and other measures can often be used systematically to save trees from removal. In this way, we both, accomplish the goals of those involved, while also acting as good stewards of the urban environment, our natural heritage. Look, let's be honest. I do a lot of removals. That is just part of the trade. There is a very real concept of 'wrong tree, wrong place'. I get it. All I'm saying, is that our primary focus as professional arborists, ought to be on trimming and preservation, rather than on removals. There are untold numbers of 'tree guys' out there, who go around cutting trees down for cutthroat prices, with no consideration for the future of the neighborhoods that they operate in. But the reality is this: trees take an incredibly long time to grow. You can lose your entire lawn, call a sod guy, and within a few hours, you can have a brand new lawn. It just doesn't work that way with trees. Trees are a long-term investment. Trees are the elder statesmen of the urban landscape. They are unlike all man-made structures, and different than all of the other aspects of landscape design. Trees are unique, and they deserve our utmost respect and admiration. I love trees, but I'm not a tree-hugger. If you can understand that contradiction, then you can start to understand how I see our unique role in the community at large, both as professional arborists, and as business and thought leaders. So, there it is. Thoughts? Opinions? Let's continue the conversation.
    16 replies | 400 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    with a petroleum explosion of 3000 degrees maybe... but certainly would have offered more protection in this scenario... I use the ugly gloves and they work well around a campfire...
    6212 replies | 453324 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    If he had been wearing a pair of gloves he would have been better able to handle the burning pieces.. People often overlook gloves as an important piece of PPE. I don't work without them.. I always like to take spark arresters out... don;t need them around here... Out in Cali is different.. could lite the grass up... never thought you light up a palm like that
    6212 replies | 453324 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    only asking cause I see that day coming for me on the horizon....
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    How's that feel???
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    when was your last rodeo?
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    C'mon Butch, Got anything to ad here? You made the move from climber to bucket op... did you change your game?
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Ya , what was that about... Was that the one where you were trying to say that the outer fibers have more holding strength than the center fibers... or maybe that was woodworking boy... honestly I have a terrible memory for these things... in any case... you don't seem to have any intelligent criticisms of the cuts or techniques discussed here, so you just throw some mud at the bearer... Its an old political trick.... when the facts and logic don't support your case, throw a personal attack out there...So what else do you have????
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Actually not just hard to reach... it was impossible to reach ... unless I was going to put the bucket and boom across the front of the hinge, which could only be done to start the back cut. Even then it would require a time consuming and unnecessary re-positioning of the bucket.... While flushcut may still think this is a lazy man's cut, I would venture a guess that he doesn't use a bucket much... One of the main differences between climbing and using a bucket is the bucket's lack of mobility, often forcing the op to cut and rig in a way that would not be required from rope and saddle. Working from the bucket is a little more of a head game due to those limitations.. I'll often switch up the rigging points with redirects and satellite rigging points, multiple times that a climber would have to work a lot harder to achieve. And creative rigging is often needed to keep the bucket and boom out of the rigging path when a climber could just shimmy over to the other side of the tree to make the cut. Because climbing is such a physically demanding part of the job, there is a major focus on the climbing aspect of tree work, and rightly so. Lots of focus on climbing gear and technique. This focus seems to have overshadowed the cutting and rigging techniques among arborists... That's evident from the forums and youtube videos.. (Obviously where there are loggers involved the focus is going to be more on falling / cutting techniques) When movement is so fast and easy with the bucket, the focus on climbing skills and gear goes to zero, and then all that's left (other than bucket placement) is cutting and rigging techniques.. It's a new and different game. Though it might not look much different to the untrained, it has been for me. There are a lot of climbers that never got to make the switch because they never had access to a bucket. I AM always looking for the fastest, safest easiest way to get a job done. SO I have put a lot of focus on cutting and rigging... It's keeps it interesting for me after all these years. I try to reduce the total number of cuts I make and save time on every cut I do make.. Seconds add up to minutes, minutes ad up to hours, hours ad up to days, days up to weeks... Over time it makes a huge difference.. And faster is often safer and offers options to situations that could otherwise be very dangerous. The trees in my market are big enough to push the limits of a 75' bucket. I'll often have to rig big stuff in a way that wouldn't be needed by a climber. It's rare that I use a crane on a tree that I can get the bucket to. Lot of other guys don't think like that. They'll just bring in the crane anytime they get something that pushes the limits of the bucket. I know one of the guys that bid on this tree. He has a 75' bucket too, but was planning on a second day with the crane, after taking what brush he could with the bucket. I almost had this tree down in a day. So it might be worth having a discussion on the difference between lazy and efficient... I could show plenty of the standard, by the book, boyscout approved stuff. I do it all day long.. after 30 years it's automatic. I don't bother posting it ... I'd rather show and discuss out of the box techniques. Which may seem threatening to the less skilled.. Until you have the basics mastered, going outside the lines cold be very dangerous in this business.
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    This ius another short bar hinge, with a 25" bar.... that's a roof in the background... big ass cut at 30' and a good example of a cut that was hard to reach from both sides with the bucket
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    After a hurricane I explain to homeowners that they have PTSD, and they are just freaked out right now and wait at least 6 months to make a decision on the tree, and if they still want it down they can have it done then, because after all the tree just made it through a hurricane. It's not going anywhere.. Doesn't always work, but i think using the word PTSD is helpful so they can realize its more about them than the tree.....
    14 replies | 388 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Not quite there Bermy.. Its the inverted shelf and the mirrored dutchman... the latter of which I posted a few pics on here some time ago .....
    190 replies | 5925 view(s)
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About August Hunicke

Basic Information

About August Hunicke
Biography:
Born (1968) and raised in the Alaskan bush. No power, no running water my entire childhood. We lived almost entirely off the land, eating salmon and moose meat primarily. Bought rice, beans, and wheat in large sacks periodically. My father was originally from Southern California but after Vietnam wasn't welcomed home. He made his own home with my beautiful mother in Hatcher Pass Alaska, far from stores and cars and highways. He built the log cabin I was born in. He delivered me and my brothers and sisters there and raised us up working hard. He read us the bible and taught us about God. I'm not ashamed of it nor do I think I have to plead with anyone to "get saved." Growing up, I was embarrassed at times by where we lived and thought we were poor because we didn't have light switches and drive a k car. Now I know we were rich. Rich in substance and heart and capability. I thought I was lazy as a child because I didn't look forward to all the hard work. I found out later when I entered the work force in the tree and also commercial fishing industries that I was not lazy but in fact stood out as a hard worker. I live in Oregon now, 2 miles from my now civilized parents (light switches and all) because they moved here. I have a beautiful wife and little ones. I want them to be close to my parents. Home is wherever my parents go and I intend to carry on the legacy of love of my father until I die in all my relationships, including here at the Tree House.
Location:
Oregon
Interests:
Hunting, fishing, tree wrecking, writing, working with video.
Occupation:
Tree Service Owner

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