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  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    05-19-2015
    Ax-Man replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    WOW, Super Nice Looking Wood
    887 replies | 72998 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    04-17-2015
    If you can get $50 to $100 bucks for that log I would take the cash and forget about furniture and bow staves and firewood. I think you'll be ahead in the long run myself .
    14 replies | 1938 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    03-01-2015
    Ax-Man replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    Nice job on that bench /coffee table. I made one similar to that a few years ago. Seeing that benches are the latest posts on the milling thread I'll post up my latest creation. I milled some Austrian Pine slabs using my chainsaw mill about two years ago. I decided to make a pew style bench out of those slabs by eyeballing it and using just a chainsaw with some joinery, mostly dado joints and not using fasteners of any kind. I did cheat a little with the tape measure mostly for length and width of the slabs . The right side didn't come as good as the left. I can never seem to duplicate chainsaw cuts on the second try. I still have a little more work to do to it. It was rickity going at first but the more I did to it the stiffer it got. The back rest really stiffened it up. It didn't turn out too bad considering; but could be a little better.I just wanted to see if I could make a big bench with out getting all involved with measuring and cutting with other types of tools. I don't know if I going to to do the finish work like sanding it,shaping the wood here and there and apply some kind of finish on it. The table was an first ever attempt with a chainsaw. I used the lest desirable pieces I had for this experiment. I watched an old dude up in Alaska on U-tube make a bench using only a chainsaw and sledge hammer. He did most of the joinery using a dovetail spline type cut. I am not going to get in detail on this only to say that he roughed out the joints and used what he called a kerf cut to make the joints fit. That kerf cut involved getting the two pieces of wood to start into the cut , then bore cut between the two pieces , the resulting kerf would close the cut and with a sledge hammer drive it home. The dovetail joints were kind of like a wedge to hold everything together. I tried that boring kerf cut on that table and some on the bench and it does work, a little on the dangerous side for the the saw to kick back on you. I didn't dovetail either but used a through mortise joint and cut off the excess when the legs fit tight. I did cheat to level the legs as there was no way I could do that with just a saw. Instead of messing around with clamps and boards and a level I put the thing upside down on my homemade suspended rail chainsaw mill and cut the legs in one cut. That was a first time thing also The surprising thing was that even though I used only a chainsaw the bench and table came out level. I was surprised that happened also
    887 replies | 72998 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    01-04-2015
    Ax-Man replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    Cool, glad to see your having fun. I am getting geared up to do some milling myself with my little outfit, if the winter cooperates that is . Just curious, what are you going to do with the slabs your cutting??
    887 replies | 72998 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    12-07-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Chain runs at idle. in Chainsaws!
    In addition to all this good advice ,check the pulse line. These darn things some how come off and can make a saw run squirrely. The line is under the handle where the carb is located , it hooks up to a little nipple in the handle which connects it to the intake manifold pulse hole in the rubber intake boot which connects to the pulse hole in the body of the carb. It is very dark under the handle and hard to see the darn thing so your going to need a flashlight or better yet one of those mini mag flashlights. This has happened more than once to me and I always seem to forget to attach the darn thing if for some reason I have to take the handle off. A pair of small needle nose pliers and a flashlight will do the trick if this is the problem.
    123 replies | 6585 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    11-26-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Chain runs at idle. in Chainsaws!
    Ha, must be some kind of clutch bug going around this time of year. One of my 200's started doing the same thing. What ticks me off was that I just fixed the darn thing so it would turn off using the switch instead of the choke which is major pain in the rear. It is not unusual for a saw in cold weather to have the chain kind of run or creep fast around the bar until the cylinder gets hot enough to burn up all the mix in the combustion chamber before it settles down. Not all saws are like this but it seems that if the carb on a 200 is set right they are kind of prone to do this, at least some of mine are , even those old 020's would do the same thing. As soon as they get warm they settle down and run all day long with no problems.
    123 replies | 6585 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    09-13-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    Sorry for not keeping up, busy with work, no pics either. Mrs. Ax and I finally were able to take long deserve holiday for the two of us, nice to get away for a brief time. I have played a little more with the Wolverine and getting better results. Stig , my bad on the convex grind . I think what I meant to say was hollow grind for that skew. The metal gets a little dished behind the cutting edge. It makes really sharp edge but from what I have researched it is not recommended for a skew. I think I made a mistake using the V arm to sharpen that tool instead of using a regular tool rest. I do know one thing is that my new tools are HSS and hold an edge much longer and are much easier to work with and are speeding things up .
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    08-30-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    Stig, I have it set up right with with the 3/4 in. spacer board under the grinder. I don't know if I am using the right words for the convex grind . I am only going by what I have seen or read on the internet. The skew I am talking about was used, came to me with the the first lathe I bought and has a 25 degree angle on both sides . I have no idea if this is correct or not. Many of the tools that I have are second hand and don't know for sure if they have the correct angles or not. I'll try and get some pix up.
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    08-30-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    Jay , I guess my concern is I don't want to ruin my good tools especially my new tools going through a trial and error process . I am probaly being over paranoid thinking I am going to grind too much away or not getting the proper angles. I was glad to see Stig's comment about grinding away precious tool length to get the right grind on a particular tool. This kind of bother's me also ,not getting it right the first time. The one thing I have found out using the Wolverine is that you can't use it like a regular bench grinder mostly because you are sharpening on the upper quadrant of the grinding wheel instead of the middle of the wheel. It is almost like you have to divide the angle you want in half to get it to come out close. I had to redo a bowl gouge on on my regular grinder to get it back to way it was suppose to be, I didn't lose that much metal but it bugged me to have to redo it. I sharpened a skew on it and it came out nice and sharp but the grinder put more of a convex type grind on the tool. I am not so sure I like that or not. There are many different types of skews and angles you can put on them that I am probaly being to picky. The Wolverine is a good set-up I just need to play with it some more and fine tune my sharpening skills even it means screwing up and having to do redo some tools. I guess I was dreaming thinking that after reading the instructions and watching the video that my sharpening problems I had doing it freehand on my regular grinder would just disappear . :lol::lol: I'll get there I am sure of that.
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    08-29-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    Anyone using the One- Way Wolverine sharpening jigs with a slow speed grinder to sharpen your lathe tools. If so , how do you like it?? I recently splurged and bought this system along with a Rikon slow speed grinder and a few pricey long handled tools. I like the system but there is a learning curve to using it. So far I have only sharpened my second choice tools for practice and have had good results getting them sharp. Before I move up to my good tools I was wondering if there are any pitfalls or things to avoid so I don't ruin them. The DVD and the printed instructions that came with the Wolverine system seem to have left out many details for using this system. Kind of like a hit and miss and trial and error thing before you get really good results. I hope this isn't a derail for this thread as it isn't actual wood turning but it wasn't really worthy to start a whole new thread
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    08-22-2014
    That is a good one. I got a good chuckle out of that one. Nice to see people with a sense of humor.
    228 replies | 16561 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    08-22-2014
    Nicely worded, especially the last paragraph. I am not a certified arborist any more because I got tired of people calling wanting free over the phone information and not willing to pay to have someone come out and look at the trees. In our area there isn't much demand for specilized arborist work anyway because the bulk of the work is either removals or trimming and pruning. I don't miss being a certified arborist and our business hasn't suffered at all. If I get questions on a tree while doing a plain old estimate, I do answer the question but don't go into big details or explanations that are over most people's head. Like many have stated, I have put my best foot forward and had it stepped on toooo many times by being underbid after taking so much time with a potential customer. I basically just wasted my time, knowledge and gas. If I do get a call from someone wanting information I refer them over to the local extension service.
    53 replies | 4155 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    08-17-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Stripped spark plug hole in Chainsaws!
    What is a time sert????? Never heard of that one. Had two saws that stripped the plug holes , a 66 and a ms 200. I just got a new P&C for the 200 and scrounged a good cylinder for the 66 . I just didn't think a heli coil work in the long run. I picked up a Shindawa saw at a garage sale awhile back with a stripped plug hole. Not wanting to spend $100 bucks on a new cylinder I might try to fix it with a time sert if someone can tell me what it is or where to get it.
    24 replies | 3783 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    07-26-2014
    I am about 75 miles southwest of downtown Chicago. At the moment I don't have many chips to interest a tub grinder operator. I only got on the mulch kick is because I lost my dump spots temporarily. I now have them back for the time being. The day may come when I will lose them for good and may have to have a tub grinder to come in to do some custom grinding or do it myself. Thanks for the offer though.
    15 replies | 1289 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    07-26-2014
    Hmm, you may be right Butch. Knowing my neighbor that thing probaly had some very dull blades in it. It was really struggling when he feeding in those small branches. Like I said this was just something to try and see what resulted from it. I think with some fine tuning it might work. This was also the first time I ever seen on of those small chippers work . I have seen them in stores and some vids but this is the first I ever seen one actually work.
    15 replies | 1289 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    07-26-2014
    Gentlemen, based on the replies I knew a tub grinder was what I needed to get all along. I pretty much dismissed my ideas as another hair brain waste of money scheme. Until today. My neighbor who is a small engine nut who decided to finally trim his ash tree that has had a large limb that has been crawling on top of his roof for the last five years. He had a fair amount of debris to get rid of and he was shoving it down this 5 hp chipper shredder which naturally was very slow going not mention how fine he had to cut the stuff. He came over and offered $50 bucks to fire up our chipper to help him out, which I did. His wife seen the partial load of chips in the truck and wanted me to dump them , I did that also. After dumping the chips I asked my neighbor to see if that little chipper shredder would regrind my chips as an experiment to see if what I was talking about in the first post to see if smaller equipment would work for small scale mulch. I was surprised to see that little chipper shredder actual to in those course wood chips of mine.. It chipped my chips faster than shoving small branches into it. The chips it made weren't too bad, kind of what I have been looking for . My neighbors wife also liked the reprocessed chips and promptly got her wheelbarrow and started making mulch to decorate her flower beds. They even ran it through a third time to produce even finer chips. I didn't get a picture of those chips. After seeing and doing this I can't help but wonder if something bigger and faster but along the same lines might work for a small scale mulch biz instead of getting a tub grinder. Here are a few pics. My chipper knives are getting dull from all the storm work , normally my chips aren't so course and stringy but with all this storm damage there hasn't been much time for maintenance unless it rains which it hasn't. The first time we did this the chips from shredder were a little more uniform than the ones in the pic. I was feeding them in at a slower rate. I went to get the camera and naturally my neighbor was pushing that little chipper to the max and the chips were't quite as nice as the first time we tried this.
    15 replies | 1289 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    07-22-2014
    Does anyone know of a cheap way to double grind wood chips on a small scale to turn them into a more desireable mulch that people seem to prefer these days. I don't have a problem at the moment getting rid of the chips but that might change someday and I might get forced into the mulch business. I have tried to sell our best chips but no luck on that one because they are still too course. It used to be I could sell our chip and have a waiting list but those days are gone , everyone seems to want fine ground fancy dyed mulch that costs an arm and and leg and decomposes within a year. We just recently got clobbered HARD with a nasty wind storm , I almost lost all three places we dump at for free. I have no desire nor the room for stockpiling chips at our place as it would not be long and we would be floating in a virtual ocean of chips with no outlet. I have tried composting them but that hasn't worked out to good, because you need a way to pulverize the composted chips and then screen them. I don't want to get involved with tub grinders because of the intial expense (money I don't have :lol::lol:,)plus the added maintenance I would have to do. I was thinking that maybe a PTO driven hammermill feed grinder might work or a PTO driven wood chipper might work.. I have a 40 horse loader tractor and thought maybe of spreading out a pile of chips and drive over them with a rotary mower ( bush- hog) attachment. I have tried this with our finishing mower with mixed results. the mower basically levels out the chips but doesn't do much to reduce chip size. I don't know if thicker heavy blades would work or not. Any thoughts or input on this would be helpful
    15 replies | 1289 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    05-19-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    I agree 100%
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    05-18-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    Stig's recent reply got me motivated as I was close to finishing my three bowl project.:lol::lol: Here are the pic's. Each bowl has it's own story so I'll try not to drag this out. I downloaded the pic's first so I hope I get the order right for each bowl. At times I thought I was making small pots instead of bowls Bowl #1 is made from Apple with some spaulting in it or maybe a better way to describe it some rotting. Apple is pretty wood but like Stig mentioned it can be a pain to turn. It can split,pieces break off if your too rough with the tools this piece was no exception so I quit while I was ahead but it still didn't turn out like I wanted it to. It would have turned out better if I sanded more like I did the other two. Apple will split within hours after you turn it. You have to get on it quick with sealers to keep it from checking too bad. this piece was finished with two coats of Tung oil with a top coat of Shellac to give it some shine. Bowl #2 is some spaulted Maple. I have always liked the look of spaulted Maple but it too is very difficult to work with. I wanted to try U-Tubes Captain Eddie's "Shine Juice" as a finish but screwed up mixing it the first time . I dumped brush cleaner in the mix instead of mineral spirits, that bowl looked awful which meant resanding the whole bowl along with using some sanding sealer as I resanded it. I don't know if made a big difference or not. I got the "Shine Juice" right the second time and used Stig's method to apply it on the lathe. I liked the way this bowl turned out. It has the look I was looking for along with a nice shine and a really nice smooth feel when you touch it. The other two bowls have a some what rough feel because I didn't apply the finish on the lathe even though I sanded them on the lathe. Bowl # 3 is Cherry, the goal on this one was to use the chuck and finish it with no tell tale signs it was ever on a lathe. I did accomplish that goal but it was a trial and error process. The bowl was suppose to be bigger and was going good but I didn't get rid of all the pith and splits were showing up and during the hollowing process I got a catch with the bowl gouge and really made a couple of deep gouge marks in it. I had to reduce the overall size of the bowl to get rid of these marks. The darn thing still has some small checks in it even after putting the finish on it. The finish is two coats of that shine juice only applied with a brush on the first coat and a shop towel for the second coat. I am not impressed at all with the way it came out . If I had applied it on the lathe like the maple bowl it might have turned out different. I have just about about given up on Cherry wood for the lathe. I like the color but it splits worse than apple, the grain isn't all that great either. I have made boards out of Cherry logs that look really good and have stayed stable during the drying process with very few checks and minimal warping. I don't know I guess it all depends on individual pieces of wood. I could go on and on with this bowl making experience but will end it here. These bowls were a first attempt and a good learning experience for doing future bowls. In case anyone wants to know what " Shine Juice " is it is nothing more than 1/3 Shellac 1/3 boiled linseed oil 1/3 denatured alcohol. I used mineral spirits instead of alcohol. I was going to be daring like Jay and add some urathane to it but didn't.
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    05-18-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    Thanks Stig, I like your approach to finishing a bowl. Finding some of the things you have mentioned is a little hard to find. Our local stores don't exactly cater to wood turners. They have some things but not a big selection either. The chuck is the Stong Hold model. I have only used it once but I like it and feel much safer than the other POS chuck I got
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    05-18-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Carb adjust in Chainsaws!
    Carbs can and do go bad for whatever reason I don't know. I have had a few that no matter how much you cleaned it along with new guts and the darn saw still won't run right . I had a few that you would swear were sucking air. A pressure / vac test revealed no internal problems. Stick a known to be good carb on the bad running saw and it runs real good. This is coming out of left field but I am just curious if it is a good idea if it can be done at all is to boil out a carb to clean it internally. Something along the lines of like a hot plate set on low with some type of cleaning solution. The risk of a fire is great of course. How about the carb itself, could it take the internal expansion? This is something I have thought of but haven't done it. If I did it would definately be outside.
    40 replies | 2349 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    05-18-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    The computer is working good today and have a little time on my hands so I thought I would get caught up on this thread. Thanks for the recent replies they have been helpful. I have made three bowls since the my last post , two using just face plates and the third with my new to me chuck after the long awaited missing chuck key finally came from OneWay in Canada. I'll some pics when they are all done. I have been playing around with different finishes on them and sanding them more than other pieces I have done on the lathe. These are just my thoughts about about some finishes from my limited experience. Oil based finishes like tung oil, boiled linseed oil either straight or thinned with mineral spirits bring out grain patterns but tend to darken wood. This can be good or bad depending on what you want to see. I also don't see much difference between one or the other after they dry. When you read the labels on the cans I think the adjectives used are just to get you to buy one product over the other. Shellac is nice it can go either way as a base or top coat, doesn't seem to darken wood like the oil based finishes and gives a good finish. Urathanes and spar varnish are nice for top coats if you like a real shiny look . They can darken wood also if used as a base and top coat . Shellac or sanding sealer as a base coat followed with the poly's or spar varnish makes a nice finish. Some poly's aren't recommended as a top coat over shellac. I have no clue as to why. Anyone ever do any blending of finishes?? I have tried it a little and so far I don't see much of a difference in doing this verses doing it one step at a time. I don't know maybe I am expecting too much out of these wood finishing products. I pick what I think are unique pieces in the rough , turn them, sand them and they look great on the lathe. I put the finish on hoping for eye opening grain patterns to emerge from the finish that brings out all the little details I see in the grain but fall short in my expectations. Does it make a difference in the finish if you apply it while the piece is still on the lathe and spinning??? I haven't really done this much, I have just taken the turned pieces off the lathe and used a brush or spray to finish them. I have avoided this because of the mess it can make on the lathe and am too lazy to put down paper to keep the finish off the the lathe bed and motor. Anyone use sanding sealer?? I am using it on the last bowl just to see if makes any difference in the finish outcome. Before I forget, while making these bowl blanks some of them still had the bark on the outside. I am not into natural edge bowls yet and didn't want any bark on them to save time and effort during the roughing process. A air hammer/air chisel works good for this. Knocks that bark right off with very little effort. The air chisel also worked good taking the bark off some small logs I have stored for making more ornamental type stuff. It beats using hand tools and hopefully will be a little safer when using the roughing gouge.
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    04-28-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    I can say for sure I am on the eve of making my first bowl from some apple wood with my new to me 1442 Jet inboard ,outboard wood lathe. I finally found some time for myself to play with the lathe. I roughed out some blanks awhile back and just about killed my band saw finishing them so I wouldn't have so much roughing to do. I only got as far as rough shaping the bowl but I can see why you guys turn bowls . It sure is fun especially with some of my new tools that came with the lathe . I hope I don't screw it up. I got the lathe from an elderly woman whose husband can no longer work with the lathe. She hired us too do some tree removal and trimming at her farm. She made me a good deal on it along with just about all the accessories to do bowl turning, tools like bowl gouges, face plates, a nice heavy duty self centering chuck from One Way in Canada ( Srtonghold model) . That is what her husband did with the lathe. She was glad to see it go to me because of my interest in wood otherwise it was going to be sold at auction. Now for a few questions How important is getting rid of the dreaded " pith " for turning these bowls. From what I have seen to be politically correct in eliminating this pith is to noodle a firewood length log in half . I have done this but to be honest there isn't a whole lot of wood left unless your doing some really big logs. Next. what is a good food safe finish to put on these bowls?? So far I have come up with tung oil, shellac, and beeswax. I personally don't see any bowls I make as being used to serve food but more as decoration around the house but you never know I might sell a few and have no idea what they might be used for. Probaly jumping the gun on this part but it could happen. I'll post a pic if I do a good job on this bowl. The wood is apple with spalting in it. It is a little on the soft side , this new to me lathe is a vast improvement over my old stuff when it comes to turning between centers , really bites down on the stock ,hope I don't split the piece.
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    04-03-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Stihl 201 upgrade kit in Chainsaws!
    This kit is following similar lines what a Stihl tech told me. If you take a 200 carb along with a 200 complete ignition system and install it onto a 201 it would be a good saw like a 200. I have no clue if it work but it might be worth a try if you have a dog 201 with some spare 200 parts.
    205 replies | 22371 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    04-03-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Aftermarket parts ????? in Chainsaws!
    I'll give it a try AL, I have the stuff to do it . There isn't much room for a bigger screw in those cylinder holes so it might be a hit or miss type thing.
    14 replies | 1068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    04-02-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Aftermarket parts ????? in Chainsaws!
    I have checked them out. If Bailey's are selling them them they must be pretty good, although I am still a little hesitant because I bought an aftermarket piston for an 024 and it was not a good experience , but that was a few years ago. I don't think I will need engine parts for my current 066 project because I have some good used engine parts that I am confident will work. I do have some 200's with stripped out threads in the cylinder for the muffler . I can't find any good used cylinders so these aftermarkets from Bailey's might solve the problem.
    14 replies | 1068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    04-02-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Aftermarket parts ????? in Chainsaws!
    Thanks, that pretty much answers my question. You get what you pay for and stay away from them and see if I can't find some good used Stihl parts. It is going to be tough. These part dealers are getting sneaky too. They put up a Stihl part number and just say it is a replacement part for whatever model saw.You have to careful if you want to get genuine used or NOS Stihl parts. Another thing I noticed is these aftermarket piston and cylinder kits to rebuild an engine are all over the place. I myself wouldn't use one but they sure can make engine rebuilding cheap. I can see why they are so attractive when you compare these parts to buying them through a Stihl dealer.
    14 replies | 1068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    04-02-2014
    It has been awhile since I had a project saw on my bench but I found a couple of 66's /64's that I can rebuild . They are missing parts like the starter housings, chain brake handles and top handle. It has been awhile since I have cruised the saw salvage dealers for used parts. I have noticed that aftermarket parts from overseas seems to be the norm these days. Is this stuff any good to use?????? Stihl parts are getting pricey and hardly make rebuilding a used saw worth the time and effort . Anyone tried these aftermarket parts. ?????
    14 replies | 1068 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    03-18-2014
    We kind of have the same problem . Unpainted metal along with leeching and decomposition from the chips themselves over time coats the metal that allows chips to adhere to the corners and then to the sides Compaction is another factor to this problem especially if a truck isn't dumped on a daily basis. Just driving down the road will settle a load of wood chips.
    72 replies | 4289 view(s)
  • Ax-Man's Avatar
    03-01-2014
    Ax-Man replied to a thread Wood Turning in The Rec Room
    DANG I didn't know we had a turning thread here. I had no clue so many of you were into turning. Good thing I had some time to kill and found it.You guys are doing some nice and I mean very nice work turning those bowls. I am envious. Hope you don't mind me chiming in. I have had a lathe for a few years but recently got another one I like much better than my old one with the worn out tail stock because it is bigger and easier to use. I also got some face plates with it to be able to make some bowls. I have tried turning bowls but a good chuck would make life easier. The chuck I got with this lathe is almost useless so any serious bowl turning is on hold for awhile till I get one along with an actual bowl gouge and a heavy duty roughing gouge. Takes talent and skill to turn a nice bowl. I have made all kinds of things with my lathe ,wood working mallets, small mushrooms, eggs, candle stick holders ect. ect. The one thing I really enjoy and keep going back to is making odd looking pieces that is similar to spindle turning and making finials. I don't know why , maybe it is because of all the different types of cuts involved and the variety of shapes is almost endless. Here is a pic of some of my work. Most are practice pieces to get a feel for the tools and different ways to shape wood. They kind of look like fancy chess pieces except for the mushrooms. Some of these pieces aren't finished, some are with the two biggest pieces being my most recent work. Some day I hope to incorporate this style of turning into some of my rustic woodworking.:D:D
    372 replies | 22068 view(s)
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