• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    10 Hours Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    I tried it in pitch, dead wooding a Cedrus atlantica, and it's definitively not a matter of a cleaning lazyness. The Akimbo absolutely hates the pitch, as Porbrick says in the instructions. It's the onliest downside I've found for the moment. Basically, you can manage to come up by pushing on the Pantin, but never come down. It becomes really locked on the rope, even fully collapsed and down rotated to straighten the rope. In SRT, my weight helped a little to force the rope "sliding" step by step, but in DdRT, no way, it was really stuck. Put the Pantin on, take out the weight off the Akimbo, free the cams, take some slack, put the weight back on it, remove the Pantin ... The final descent was a bit time consuming ! But still, I love it.:) Oh! and the rope is an Argiope purple, 12,1 mm, a tinny tad over the max allowed (12 mm).
    1083 replies | 61760 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    That doesn't bother me any more, since I have mine:P ;) :love:
    1083 replies | 61760 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    I don't know much about the limiter, but just stop the engine, adjust a little bit the screw, start again and listen the saw cutting. Beside that, she want more fuel to eat. She's hungry and doesn't have what she needs when she rev's up, showing some lack of power and running lean.
    45 replies | 1187 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    It's like the ms150T. Her problem is that the case's seam in the middle of the front often touches the wood first and tends to swing the saw to the right. The bar doesn't agree of course and there's a little conflict in the stability. I saw a dog on the parts list, so I ordered one. Well better. The dog hits first and stabilizes the saw as it should be. It's light enough to not impair the balance. More important, you get a fulcrum point to rotate the bar in the wood. The wrist and the forearm are thankful, even on this light baby saw.
    30 replies | 736 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Yes, I agree completely on the principle and I have it often in mind. I don't like the spurs by them self, they're dangerous and can't be trusted (that's just me), but spurs and rope are more useful together than each alone and bring some helpful possibilities in work positioning. I appreciate that, despite the risk of injury. The foot ascender fits nicely in this scheme as a rope aid. Very few times it gave me some troubles using the spurs ( bad placed bump on the trunk or very rough bark). The onliest time I wound myself with the spurs (yet) wasn't climb related. Some dry dirt was stuck between the teeth of the grip. I scraped it off with a finger and to remove the loose bits, I had the bright idea to tap the spur with my hand... just on the spike. I saw it at the last moment but too late to stop my hand. Ouch. A nice triangular hole.:|:
    36 replies | 851 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I don't trust my eye gauge, so it's the little guide. It's far more accurate. The first time I fill the rakers on a chain, I use the guide just one or two times to know what's needed and go with the stroke's numbers on each raker after that. It's quicker. The next raker's fillings, I use the guide more often, until at each raker at the life's end of the chain. It's slower but more accurate when the chain could have some variations in the teeth's length. Usually, it's when comes the need of a caliper to regularize the teeth.
    45 replies | 1187 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I never took the time to learn it, so, it kicked out time to time when I needed to keep it and every time it didn't let go the rope when I wanted... truly, that sucks. The small biner is one more thing to do and doesn't match with the KISS principle. It's a good trick for ascending the bigs trees, but not for working in the canopy. Petzl sells now a lock which we can add to the Pantin and make it acts like a Croll or a hand ascender. I have a CT one now. Much more reliable, but you have to open the lock manually like the other toothed cam ascenders. It takes more time and more care to take the rope out. Not so easy with the spurs too. Can't we have both properties in one device? Easy on, easy off, but hold it securely in the middle?
    36 replies | 851 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    I prefer a big bunch of leafy limbs than logs. That gives a real cushion but it's rarely practical. Either the limbs are already chipped ( you can't ask the crew to delay the clean up until the last hour !) or I have to stack them by hand (I don't have a loader). I use often the cross logs, but I got many times some pretty good divots in the grass, as Cory said. When the trunk hits, it's a hard hit, no matter what, the energy has to go somewhere. Engineering the stack like a multi layers bridge should work fine if done well, keeping room in between to give way, folding/breaking the logs to absorb the energy. Actually, it's a very good way to make air born logs flying around. Last one, I did a divot in a fence wall with that! Shitty roughcast, but still. I tried too the firewood logs well stacked, not very successful : it spited logs over 10' around and the first level of logs was incorporated into the ground ... The big bunch of logs, not stacked but in bulk, works well though, say 2 or 3 cubic yards. But it has a downside : the trunk likes to roll down the logs pile. It can be annoying.
    5967 replies | 379706 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Damn baby spruce just in the way ! I think that he made a notch. During the first part (at 0'20"-0'25"), he looks very closely where he cut on the downside. Isn't it to insure that the both cuts of the notch meet correctly ? After that, a quarter cut with a wedge, then the second quarter cut in two times. He's very surprised and doesn't understand why he got that, because he has a close look again at the stump to find what's wrong with his cut. Not everybody does this on his stumps (but should), messed or not. Maybe he isn't a certified faller, but at least he seems to be a good enough treeman, at least in my eyes. Or will be... Too bad we can't see the stump like he did. I bet he got the answer at his question.
    68 replies | 1495 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Barberchair you said? Look at this one : <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bPHV1uJxUNQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> Very very close !
    68 replies | 1495 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread New one in Chainsaws!
    I guess that they surely did. But releasing the "concept" thing in the public is a double edged blade. It's good for the fame, but the competition knows what you're doing, and the customers compare with what they can actually buy and that's not in favor on the products already on the market.
    70 replies | 1666 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    It's in my computer now, thanks a lot. I was very surprised when I saw the publishing year, I thought at a typo. For me, it was more around 17..-18.., in the golden age of the sail marine and in the line of all the discoveries and knowledge collections.
    8 replies | 200 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    You can take it by the other way : what I loose if I save 100 $ on it? That could help to see the things by down grading the top, then it appears that the money could have a little less value than what you are looking for. I agree, it's often a difficult decision. Maybe there is only one thing for which I didn't think too much about the advantages vs money : it's the Akimbo :D
    55 replies | 1297 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    He should hold it by the back instead of by the front. I don't know if the rotator and the grapple can handle such a load, but at least they would take it in the right way, not forced upside down. These rotators are designed to sustain only an axial load and are mounted with a dandling joint. The driver put it in abutment on the side while the trunk wanted to move farther with some authority, tearing out the rotator. Wrecking grapples are way more sturdy and designed for that, but I guess they are a bit more expensive.
    5967 replies | 379706 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    As a matter of traction, I hauled a lot of sand and gravel with my riding mower (the usual cheap one, 12 hp) and a garden trailer. That's OK for about 900 lbs (plus the trailer's weight of course), even in a slight slope. But if the grass is wet, you are screwed ! I put some gentle quad tires at the rear to get a better grip when the first ones were toasted. They have the small X dots imprints. That's better than the grass friendly tires, but the other limiting factor is the lack of weight on the rear axle. Sadly, the axle and gear case aren't designed to hold much more than the driver, way too weak to sustain a substantial ballast. Maybe the high end mowers more seriously built...
    887 replies | 70750 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    It's a stamped aluminum plate, so it's usually pretty homogeneous. You don't find the casting defects like bubbles or foreign material inclusions. Both fractures are exactly at the same place, it's very unlikely that could be the case with a casting defect. It would be useful to see the missing part though (possibly first broke / folded in the middle and then teared out the both sides?). I'd say that's a fatigue cracking where the shearing forces concentrate. Repeated use weakens the weakest points and makes they break well under the usual breaking load. See where it broke (Pic 3), just at the cut's end, where the metal is folded and stretched by the stamping tool to make room for the web strap. The metal is thiner, elongated, more stretched on the outside of the curve, just at the junction between the full plate and the bridge section. It's a good point to start a fracture. The left broken area shows a slightly darker area on the right, about 1/3 of the surface. This should be the crack's extension for a while before the final rupture. There's one too on the right broken area, top left corner, but it's well less than 10% of the surface. I'd say that the left gave up first and the right followed in a split second as the bridge started to move. Well, that's some eating time guess, while I don't have enough time to do what I have to.:|: Let's move !:hammer:
    36 replies | 851 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I would be very concerned to let him drive the Tree Mek ! <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_XObT6cOovc?ecver=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    5967 replies | 379706 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Between the poplars, Lombardini is the most dangerous for me, no hinging at all, 2" limbs snaps with no notice. The other poplars are a little more sturdy, at least whose I met. Weeping willows are complicated, essentially untrustworthy. Not because they are prone to rot or brittle, with a little care in positioning they hold well, but you can hardly say what the hinge will do in the small limbs (say 3 to 6"). Many time I was owned because either I wanted a swing and I got a snap, or I wanted a quick release for a flat landing and this stupid hinge didn't want to break at all, tearing the base but holding forever. And that, often in the same tree. Black locusts with a quiet growth aren't so bad, actually you have to look closely to find the thorns. But if they are in trouble, by men, diseases, bugs or bad environment, they show their talent at fabricating thorns. Sadly for us, they don't have often a quiet growth in human areas. Speaking thorns, it's a small tree, more like a big shrub, but I really hate Pyracantha. Inextricable crown, all in 90 forks and full of 1" thorns. I love working in the birches and trust them, the limbs are very flexible but the wood is very fibrous and doesn't drop you. I'd say that's a friendly tree. The rotten parts hold nothing, but he isn't alone in that case.
    68 replies | 1495 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    :goodjob:
    824 replies | 76450 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    With the spring, the trees are now in the fast growing mode, that could shred the bark off the gin pole tree. An extra care should be taken to tie the line on it.
    74 replies | 1234 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I don't like the foot pushing but what scared me is that he sat under the heavy lean of a hollowed/decayed trunk, cutting it !
    5967 replies | 379706 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    At least, you have a loader... You can grip the very end of the log with the loader and alternate the ends as needed. That gives you roughly half the load to move, the ground, some logs or the trailer/truck holding the other half. It could be problematic in tight access though.
    887 replies | 70750 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread New one in Chainsaws!
    You don't want a tiny lanyard for your pistol grip, but you aren't bothered dragging an air hose all around the tree ?!!!
    70 replies | 1666 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Not to leash for me. At your wrist at least. But a tiny lanyard should be fine. Beyond the risk to drop the thing on the poor groundies, I would be more worried to not be easily able to put it away for whatever reason. You need all your hands available, eventually suddenly, to work your gear, keep your balance, catch a free falling chunk/limb... That could become a bad day if your hand is stuck with the pistol.
    96 replies | 1918 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I though on it during my breakfast. To be able to go down, maybe all you have to do is release the green bungees. Let the gravity works to put the springy strap on the downward position. If not, you stay in the ascend mode like a toothed cam on a rope. That involved some leg's work to loose the grip (up a little) and take it again (away of the trunk and down) though.
    80 replies | 1585 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Maybe it just wear and they didn't bother to repair that. On my buddy's old chipper, both locks are completely destroyed by the vibrations and the cover rattles hard. I doubt that the hinges are in a much better shape.
    29 replies | 451 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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