• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    21 Hours Ago
    Be sure that the throttle's spring has enough strength to pull it back. The small cord can get a lot of drag on the ground or by some shrubs if there's some length.
    7 replies | 275 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    The air flows around the obstacles with pressure waves and swirls. The ears are made to react at the pressure waves, because the sound is that. So, the ears are constantly beaten during the ride, either by the air flow and by the loud motor noise. Didn't you listen how quiet it becomes when you close the car's window? you feel almost in weightlessness. In a car, window opened, the head is about at the place where the air flow comes in the cabin after going round the windshield, and the left ear takes it first. It should be interesting to see if the "left drivers" get the same trouble but on the right side.
    56 replies | 1086 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    I don't think that the force involved in splitting the vertical grain represents a major part of the whole, beside the folding force of the hinge and the leveraged force of lifting the tree. It seems secondary to me, excepted if the stump is a fiber's mess. But I agree with the risk of overcutting if one cuts until the tree falls alone or if the grain is twisted. The main difference between a low and a hight back cut (for me) is the actual pushing force of the wedge: - With a level backcut, the almost vertical force of the wedge is somewhat perpendicular to the plan between the back side and the hinge. That's the most favorable way to push, like a perpendicular rope is for pulling. So, the trunk rotates around the hinge with the less input. - With a hight backcut, the wedge pushes vertically the same way, but the hinge is way bellow. The back side - hinge plan is now at a very significant angle from the previous one and the efficiency of the push is reduced. It's the same effect in pulling a tree from the ground with an angled rope. The loss of force in rotating the trunk is redirected to stretching vertically the hinge, increasing the risk of busting the fibers and losing the tree.
    297 replies | 27911 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Q-tips as far as I recall. I elaborated a movement to have a good cleaning with that and to avoid any build up. But still, I have the high pitch continuously in both ears. Now, even with the computer'fans just near me and the electric heater rattling under my desk (I love the warm air flow coming up), I hear it distinctly. It's related to nerve damage. Sensitive terminators are damaged and that doesn't heal. Training the brain by feedback is an elegant solution : "just" tell the brain to not be bothered by that. You had to be really convincing !
    56 replies | 1086 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    A climb line in place, yes, but how long can it sustains the fire? It doesn't take much time to wreck the outer fibers. Then, put a heavy friction on it...
    6212 replies | 452187 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    No, not at all. The dutchman is basically a very narrow notch inside the usual notch, on a partial or full width of the hinge ( intended or not). The narrow notch, often just a kerf, closes early and redistributes the fulcrum point and the axis of the fall. In your cut, nipping the corner, even so deeply, doesn't change one bit the shape of the notch. It just makes the hinge narrower, that's all. With a well balanced tree, you won't see a difference in the fall, contrary to the dutchman. Your cut has nothing to do with a dutchman. I used the deep nipping on a 32" diameter beech which was close to a fence wall and I didn't have the room to place my chainsaw on the far side. Handy. The spar landed exactly where the hinge told it to do, no side move.
    190 replies | 5893 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I guess that hopefully the skidsteer was here again to save the day. Without it, this tree wouldn't have fallen on its own, or if it did, anywhere where it didn't have to. You blind yourself I you really believe that you manage a pool of special techniques. I don't argue with the special techniques, but with the idea of managing. I see here almost no control at all. Put all the care you can in what you do and forget the "that will be good enough like that", as said my grand father. Actually, that won't. Gabe can be proud of his work though, nicely done.
    190 replies | 5893 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    I don't recall the rule for the stitch's length, but I would make it length enough to cover a complete turn of the yarns, just to be sure that all of them are locked equally.
    23 replies | 1105 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Yes, but even in night position, you focus your attention on the headlights and you keep being distracted from your driving. In this situation, I just put the rear views a tad out of sight, so I don't have the direct view of the headlights and I'm still able to see what's going on with a slight move of my head. Much more comfortable.
    88 replies | 2022 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    They don't want an invitation, it's just that they want you to drive a little more faster. Either not enough room with the incoming traffic, or not enough speed gain to justify to burn their tires (or for the speed limit). So they tailgate you to "invite" you to push the throttle a little and restore by your own the security distance. Poor visibility is a common factor too (and an even more stupid/dangerous one ).
    88 replies | 2022 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    People ! :lol: That makes a lot of itching spots. I don't rake toward the chipper specifically, but rather toward the main accumulation area(s). It's more efficient, time and energy, for me. It's a pain to move some weight with the rake. Usually, you make a mess under the tree and around the intake chute but there are few debris between the tree and the chipper. So why displacing the shit over an area previously easy to clean ? In the people's file, they don't leave room between them because they are leery about someone stealing their place. Same in a traffic jam, the cars are head to butt as close as possible to prevent an aggressive lane change and therefor a loss of a few feet in the progression. I hate the sniffing sound and some peoples just doesn't mind to clean their nose. In the library of the geological department at university, there was all the time a guy who had something wrong in his nose, like a restricted way. It wasn't sniffing, but the opposite. Every minute or so, came the same sort of wheezing, not loud, but unbearable.
    88 replies | 2022 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Then it has to be somewhat refined
    6212 replies | 452187 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    It's like a shackle, but the stud slides in instead of being screwed, easy to close and can't open alone. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mP8o87TVSe4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    27 replies | 683 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Mick, I had the same story as yours, less violent though. I had a painful shoulder and can't move my left arm up, not only by the pain, but the muscles just didn't want to work beyond one point. I needed to take my arm with the other hand to pull it up. It wasn't possible to open a window or take some grass seeds in a bucket held in front of my chest. Very worried about my future in tree work. One day, I made some concrete to replace a stair at the basement. Ouchy day to begin with. I needed to threw the concrete about 6 or 7 feet away. But the concrete was sticky and didn't want to live the shovel so easily. I sent the load away and pulled back hard the handle, hoping that the jerk would suffice to empty the shovel. It did, barely. Actually, the concrete pulled almost harder than me, trying to keep the shovel with it and my arm followed the handle. I won though, keeping my arm and the shovel. But what a pain in the shoulder ! I managed to do that tree times before changing my position, treating myself with some chosen words. I can be slow minded sometimes. The evening was hard with a very sore shoulder, but I felt that something was different than the usual pain. In a few days, the pain decreased and some weeks after I was able to use my arm correctly. I thought that was a bone disorder in the knuckle like a spike and the jerk broke the thing (no medical investigation of course). My idea was that if two small areas in the knuckle are damaged, one by the spike and the other because it as the broken base of he spike, it can't do well if both are facing together. So I tried to put the knuckle in an unusual position to have each damaged area in front of a good one. That's what I figured out, maybe it isn't the actual thing. In bed every night, I put my right arm overhead and fell asleep like that to got at least some time in this position. The arm wasn't very happy because the blood doesn't flow well in this position, but it seems that the shoulder appreciate it. It took months to heal completely and to return in "silent mode". Maybe one year after, the left shoulder began to annoy me the same way. No jerking motion this time, but only the arm (arms actually) over head in the bed. It took more time to normalize but that worked again. Now it's fine. I can climb as I want, the shoulders don't say a thing. And I often fall asleep still with the arms overhead. I find that as a relaxing position now.
    56508 replies | 1719272 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Give me a little time for the hysteresis. For the weight, we should use the term "apparent weight", because for us, in our environment, the mass is never affected by only the gravity. Plenty of factors play on it and the resulting force can vary greatly. In a static way, it could be approximately well guessed as the weight (think of Archimede, air movements, earth rotation ... though). But dynamically, it goes from almost zero in a parabolic fly to many many time its usual value when a chock /hard stop is involved. It can be directed toward any direction, as being a resultant force. The reference point in regard with the movements is very important too. The parabolic fly is a little far from the tree work but it's a good example : we can look at the object as stationary and weightless in the plane, but it still goes at hundreds of miles per hour in the sky. Change the plane's trajectory suddenly, and the weightless object is instantly transformed in a wrecking ball, always the same mass and same path in the sky, but with an enormous apparent weight in the plane. Back to tree work : if you take a big swing on your rope (or make a pendulum with a rigged log). Your Tip becomes your reference point. At the bottom of the swing, all you can feel is being like as much as 3 times your usual weight, no worry (excepted for me, I hate that). For the tree it isn't so simple though, since its reference point is the ground and he's actually side loaded from one side to an other with a max load of 5 to 6 times your weight (in Srt ground anchored), and that could become bad. I agree to better knowing what's going on. Even an "old" technique like the DdRT isn't clearly understood by many users. For example, the false thought that DdRT gets more elasticity by the rope than SRT canopy anchored seems very common.
    73 replies | 2955 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I second that. I can't stand to have the legs naked, even for small jobs on the ground. The skin on my shins is very thin and fragile, only a little scratch or just a touch through a jean is enough to make a mess with a wide wound and a long healing. I wear a pair of karate shin protectors under my chainsaw pants to cushion the contacts. Too bad for the rigging views, I'd like to see more precisely what's going on. Nice job and entertaining vid though. Congrats for the piano too.
    19 replies | 488 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I take this experiment as a valuable approach. There isn't any magic here and the mass of the hanging load surely doesn't change. But the hand added some force transiently in the system, which adds (or subtracts if opposite) to the weight of the load. Same with dynamic. The weight is a force exerted on a mass by the gravity. Gravity is an acceleration. Add any other acceleration / force to the system (start, stop, increase or decrease the speed, deflect the trajectory) and the weight changes accordingly. In this experiment the same result can be got by dropping the load from a certain height, instead of pulling it down by hand. The inertia at the deceleration increases drastically the weight as you all know. The friction between the rope and the bar doesn't allow any move until a certain amount of unbalanced force is reached. Then that slips, and stops as the tensile of the anchor part increases and comes closer to the pulling force. Pull a little more, that stays put, then slips and stops again. If you reduce the working load, that gives the same effect in the other direction. The anchor part keeps its initial tension, until the load is lightened enough by the same said amount of force (more or less). Then the rope slips and loose part of its tensile off the anchor part. As you can see, to get the rope moving in both ways, you have to pass a gap wide of two times the unbalance from either side of the equilibrium point. This unbalance depends directly from the friction. It's called hysteresis: it's like something doesn't take the same path when it comes back. It's obvious with a graph. With a lot of friction, you can "store" a substantial amount of force on one side without affecting the other side. With a good pulley, the difference is small enough that you can barely feel it, if not at all. The climbing line sees exactly that, either in SRT with a basal anchor, or in DdRT. For the last, the tying point doesn't care. For the first, that matters a lot, as a bouncy climb or a foot loosing can "send" an unexpected tensile on the anchor side and store it there. So the Tip has to stand for an extended time more likely 2,5 body weight instead of 1,5 (if you plan initially that the friction will work only in your favor). The tip can hold on an impulse but gives away with the same but continuous force. In this case, I agree that's really border line and we have to choose an other plan than this Tip.
    73 replies | 2955 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    First time I see that. But what's different which avoids the acid seeping through and corroding the connectors?
    7313 replies | 433661 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Instagram in Odds and Ends
    Pet pet pet pet pet, like a metronome, a friendly sound:) Thanks Stig, this vid leads to some cool blues with different old motors as a drummer. I love this idea. For the frankenzig, I'd be very worried about the side loading passing over a limb
    129 replies | 2529 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Removing the stopper knot or other stopper something from the end of the lanyard allows this slipping (or releasing the grab if you have the time) to continue past the end and frees the lanyard if the tree keeps splitting and /or falling. If not, you got only a short respite and you are in trouble again, moreover, with a fair bit of momentum added in the equation.
    130 replies | 3509 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nice idea, but the cops will be happy to see that : more money for them:evil:
    56508 replies | 1719272 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    It seems I didn't look at it close enough at the time. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Siw0nXZVi9E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    130 replies | 3509 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Thanks Grendel, I stand corrected. I saw this vid years ago, and he wasn't very successful in his attempt to cut the lanyard and that's stuck in my mind, even if I know it's doable. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0h0x08KDSMQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    130 replies | 3509 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Since we are in the "shit hits the fan", there's an other scary one. It has a better ending hopefully. For those who don't understand german, like me, action begins at 1'35. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fxpHm8utGC4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    6212 replies | 452187 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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