• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    58 Minutes Ago
    Yes, that surely would, but I didn't take this way because my very few attempts at inox welding weren't a great success. I didn't want to jeopardize this critical gear, so I stayed with what I can do reasonably well. Or actually not too badly, from a pro welder's point of view.
    31 replies | 565 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    What you can't say before hand is the effects of shocking and vibrating the pole. A small jerk on one point can easily be amplified by the length of the pole and the wires. Moreover, if the motion comes close to the resonance frequency of a component, it could become devastating, even if all the system is sound and well assembled. Remember what pounding wedge can do on a dead tree, or even the chainsaw vibrating the trunk.
    36 replies | 277 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    11 Hours Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Homemade Charcoal in MBTV
    I'm not sure, but the big barrel could act as an oven and maintain the heat more homogeneously around the small barrel. In a bonfire, the top of the small barrel wouldn't be as hot, with the flames swaying around and the fresh air coming viciously between them. The wood eats a lot of energy to be degraded. Even "dry", there is always water in it to put out, and the big molecules are hard to be demolished. So the temp could not be as height as it should. The gas produced is what burns on the wood, but the energy is freed all along the flames, with a big displacement of air. That's not good to focus on the work. More over, only the outside of a given flame is actually the fire, locally really hot admittedly, but inside the flame it's colder, deprived of oxygen with a lot of unburned gas (obviously, because that's it which burns on the outside when it finds the fresh air). The amount of oxidative and reductive areas is completely unpredictable in an open fire, so is the temp. You can either get some carbon deposits or burn your piece. An other point, the flames and the smoke are always in the way of the worker. The charcoal burns much more cleaner, you can approach it a little more and you can see clearly what's going on. Last point for the clean side, are the meat tasty when it's cooked on a burning bbq? hell no, it takes a bitter taste due to all the unburned gas and tar condensing on it.
    21 replies | 281 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    18 Hours Ago
    The answer is in the comments : And that too:
    8915 replies | 396750 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    21 Hours Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    So much energy stored just by the height of things, it's scary when we think on it. You made some really great shots, good idea the target acquired thing !
    2991 replies | 151771 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Careful with that ! Tip weight isn't the max weight at max lift, but the smallest load which makes the thing begins to fall on its nose. Due to the geometry of the arm mechanism, this point is roughly when the load is horizontal in relation to the first arm's articulation (put the arm's weight in the math). It can lift off the ground a little bit more, according to the geometry (the arm travels along part of a circle), but it never will pass the tipping point to get more height. Actually, the max load possible could be at the max height, check the geometry, but you can't get it there from the ground. Or if it's already there, you can't lower it down to the ground without tipping. (And never never drive with the load at max height). To illustrate that, there is a vid with a big log truck being unloaded by a giant loader. All the logs at once! He struggled a long time because even if he lifted the log's load off the trailer, barely, he can't pass the tipping point to lift enough to clear the ranchers, just in balance on the front wheels. Finally he succeeded, lifted the load all the way up so he can put the four wheels back on the ground and then went away.
    26 replies | 256 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    I did one myself too when I began to climb. To protect it from the rust, I used a so called "galvanizing paint" in spray can. Nothing to do with real galvanization, it's only a paint heavily loaded with zinc dust. As I expected, the paint wore out real fast along the rope's path and on the contact points with the shackle. Too bad, but it seems that the rope's friction drags some zinc particles on the steel and that keeps protecting it, even if most of the paint is gone a long time ago. My porty never sleeps outside, but it sustains the rain better than my steel carabiners and delta link on my saddle.
    31 replies | 565 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    The stump seems 6 to 8" too hight to make the fell comfortable for you, overall with your angry back. Maybe it's the bad shape of the tree and you had to cut there, but you put more strain on your back by lifting the chainsaw above your waist level. Same with the backchaining, you have to push the saw away, drag it upward for the humbolt and take hits on your belly. A painful back doesn't appreciate that. Let the tree hold the saw and take the cut's forces. Beside that, I agree that the humbold is better in this situation though.
    43 replies | 906 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread More Power Needed in Chainsaws!
    A sharp chain is mandatory but that's not enough. You need a lot of power and it comes only with the big saws. And even with them, it's a slow process, hard for the engine and the man. Cutting the fiber's end is the most energy eating cut. Every bit of wood cut out of the log is actually shredded and reduced to dust. The other ways to cut the wood give you chips or noodles where many of the fibers stay together and don't wast your energy to be separated. A small saw can work with a reasonable log's size, but only with the amount of energy delivered, which isn't much. You have to trade time against instantaneous energy. A thiner chain helps, because it needs less energy to cut through, as it removes less wood to make the kerf.
    62 replies | 1292 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    =D> Nicely done, but I agree for a full belts guard. First, it's mandatory in the industry to protect all the fast moving parts. Second, where the belts are located, they can catch all what you (don't) want, like chips, dirt, stones, twigs, grass, roots, pants, sleeves... Last, it's always a good thing to put the rubber out of the sun light. The good side of the thing, like that, the belts are very well ventilated.
    26 replies | 500 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    The powered spool is a good idea. Maybe a 600' spool is a bit too much for the trees outside Cali and Tasmania. But personally, I don't like a 500 lbs mass jumping and jerking in the human area. At all. There is enough hazard movements with all the limbs, logs and free falling dead wood, don't add an other source of worry and risk for the ground men. The climber can be put at risk too, because after going down, the limb/log can be pulled back up, following the jerking DAMS's movements. Strap it tight to the tree or to a ground anchor. Then, entrust the power (rewind, clutch, brake, chock absorber...) to an hydraulic system. It can be designed to follow every needs you can think of, eventually fully automated for the adjustment according to load and speed. It doesn't matter for you, but I would be extremely pleased to see such a system.
    27 replies | 336 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Fine control of the jaw's muscles, or they can easily shatter in pieces your teeth, which could be annoying for the survival. But the MUAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!! version is very tempting.
    53704 replies | 1494230 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Jomo, to avoid the armful backlash from the vice-grip, you get a giant backlash from your strong springs and heavy hammer head. The pet nails cutter pushes you in a way which doesn't seem right to me. The rope and many other things like a simple paper sheet or some meat are very hard to cut just by pushing a blade straight on them. The fibers fold on the cutting edge, making a cushion around it, stopping the blade's progression. The force to overcome that is enormous compared to the cutting force itself. Put a sliding movement on the blade, and suddenly the cut becomes easy. For example, you have obviously the rope and the handsaw, but too the trimmer in the printing industry. This one is a heavy duty press with a massive razor blade, but it could do almost nothing on a big pile of paper if it didn't manage a small lateral movement of the blade along its length. Look at your knife when you eat a steak (and I don't mean a Macdo's) ( but yes, even a Macdo's for that matter). I know that the cutting thing is your baby, so I'd keep that as a given. Something you could look at is the cutter blade for the carpet, it has a hook shape (centering the rope in the curved edge, so no reject of the rope nor the blade), the right size for a small rope or fishing line and easy (I think) to find. Give it a lengthwise movement with a slight angle through the rope. No need of a heavy mass to move, just ensure some travel, don't know how much, maybe 2". That shouldn't be bad. It looks like that: Or something like a film cutter: Otherwise, you have the guillotine style: but with a partially open area to slide in sideway the rope. You get the idea...
    395 replies | 9085 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Solo Tree Work in Climbing Forum
    Yes absolutely, even more when there's nobody around:dance:, as I'm not a showman at all, more on the shy side.:-# I often talk to myself when it tends to become difficult, to be sure that I agree with what I have planed.:D It's a little embarrassing if there is somebody to hear my blattering.::oops:
    97 replies | 2413 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    That's an interesting idea to accumulate the limbs in air on a low point of the speed line, then to lower all the bunch in one time just at the right spot. It seems to save a lot of time /energy to avoid reseting the line at each time. Love the music!
    2991 replies | 151771 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    It's a little gear intensive but how cool it is when all the moves are controlled. First class rigging! =D>
    30 replies | 697 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I put my head all the way back on the nap of my neck, and look absolutely forward, eyes straight darted. It's the hardest part, the eyes like to follow things. In this position, I have my 45. I take some steps back until the tree's top comes just in the middle of my field of vision. Blinking the eyes help to overcome the following reflex. Then I know the top will (or should at least) fall just 6 ' behind me. No lean, level ground of course, and no sore neck by sleeping in front of the computer ! If I want to be more accurate, I use the sticks trick, or stick trick. Stacking many reference heights is difficult because the eyes (and brain) do that with an angular motion, but the actual height is vertical and in a tangent mode compared to your eyes. The first reference height is (almost) good, but the second one drives your eyes a little too height, and the next adds an even more big error and so on. You have to reduce the reference height each time to follow the tangent progression. I suppose you are so well used to do that, that it's automatic in your mind. Mine doesn't succeed in doing this correction and I was wrong each time I tried this method.
    39 replies | 696 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    Sorry, not for me. As the cut is unidirectional and in the pulling mode (the chain doesn't allow to be pushed), only the main engine has a direct effect on the cut and is in the right place to sustain the main strain of ripping the wood. We can see different cases : If the "tip" engine is set too low on the rpm's side, the main engine has to pull both the chain throw the wood and the secondary engine to speed it to its own level. In this case you clearly loose power. If the "tip" engine is set exactly at the same speed, it does nothing else aside accompanying the main engine, maybe pulling a little the chain on the back side. Very kind of him, but I can't see that as a gain. If the "tip" engine is set at a little higher speed, then yes, it actually help to cut the wood, because the chain is in tension all the way from its socket to the entrance on the cut. If the "tip" engine is set too high, then it does all the work, and more than that, it has to pull the main engine faster. So you fall back in the first case. It must be a sweet spot to get the most power of the both saws, but I guess it could be difficult to find and to follow during the cutting process. That's the way I see it, maybe I'm wrong. It should be easier with a reversed differential mount or a hydraulic transmission, but it's far out of the subject.
    846 replies | 67343 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Looking up by the windshield to see the trees coming instead of the incoming traffic ! Well, not really smart... and a bit of worrying for the occasional passenger:/:
    60 replies | 1421 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I play with this idea too. How much power is needed to run such a trolley, heavily loaded of course and on a decent slope ? I'm thinking on the mini K-boom too, but that should be the following step :/:
    28 replies | 487 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Leaners in Climbing Forum
    So... I did it !:rockon:Yes ! Nothing glorious, just a small maple leaning toward a building. But slowly and carefully, I managed to make my body and my mind come to an agreement. At least this time. A good little exercise, bucking it down with the ms150 (no massive changes in my balance), with some variations (slight) in the lean. I wasn't too stressed, more mindful, so I guess there is some hope.:D I'm looking now for the next step, a bit more difficult.
    42 replies | 2015 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    03-18-2017
    The steel cable doesn't help, but the main actor of the backlash is the grip plier itself. You get the same when you clamp seriously some steel stock for welding or folding. With a rotating cam (for example), that shouldn't be a concern. Just an idea, make a conical end or a nosecone at the limb's contact. That will reduce the lever arm on the device and facilitate the limb's movements with less parasite force on the handle.
    395 replies | 9085 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    03-18-2017
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Leaners in Climbing Forum
    Well, I hear you. I have to put that on my improvements list and my mind on it. It will be a challenge to convince my body that I should be fine with the "top" technique.
    42 replies | 2015 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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