• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    There aren't so many squirrels here. Actually we don't see them often. I never found a rope shewed, and lastly I had to leave one in place for 2 months, with no problem, just at the edge of a wood. I'm more concerned by the thefts and I use a throw line if the tree is in an open/public space, not on a private property. For the rigging gear, what is aloft stays a loft, I coil the rope out of reach, but I remove what is at ground level, like slings, redirecting block, porty...
    18 replies | 283 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    There aren't so many squirrels here. Actually we don't see them often. I never found a rope shewed, and lastly I had to leave one in place for 2 months, with no problem, just at the edge of a wood. I'm more concerned by the thefts and I use a throw line if the tree is in an open/public space, not on a private property.
    18 replies | 283 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    The engine in my first car was a flat tween with a central carb. The steel air intake were too long and the gas condensed in the cold weather. First I used to put an electric air heater (from the bathroom) under the car to warm up all the engine. It worked but that wasn't really practical. After, I wrapped an heating cord around the both pipes of the intake. In the morning, I just plugged an extension cord to it and some minutes after, it can start. The record was -27*C this winter. I was lucky to park my car just beside my small apartment, so the electricity was handy. If not, I'd vote for a small propane blower (one which doesn't need electricity to work!) and a tarp over the engine compartment, so it warm up the engine and the hydraulics. Don't heat too hard, because the gas tank is in there too.
    21 replies | 279 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Yes it is, the knees come often enough in a "sensitive" area for adequate positioning. Not with the spurs of course, but on ropes. I can't open the deflector on my ms150 because it's spot welded on the muffler. Instead, I cut a slit on the muffler's bottom angle. Don't judge the ms150 too quick, she's really shy when new. Feed her with some gas, and you will find that after about 10 tanks, she begins to trust more in you and desires to do good job for you:D Yes for the one handed, too easy. But careful, her teeth could be small, they can bite pretty well. Like a kitten. I tested both :cry:
    7373 replies | 438876 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    About the rubber, in itself, it could be relatively inert for life, but the main concern comes from the added chemicals. Not those involved in the vulcanization, as they are pretty locked in the rubber matrix, but the protectors against oxidation and eventually some various softeners. The last ones don't stay in place as they don't belong to the rubber matrix but are here to weaken it, like the soft PVC. An unprotected rubber would crack and decompose in a few years, by the oxygen wrecking the rubber' molecules. See what you got with the cheap tyres for wheelbarrows and lawnmowers. To avoid that, they add certain antioxidants with two properties : catching the oxygen before the rubber does (but that depletes its own concentration at the surface), and having a great capacity of diffusion in the rubber to replenish the surface's concentration from the internal rubber mass. So you got a constant supply of this shit at the surface to do the protecting job. That's good for the rubber's life but not for the biological life. I don't know if you heard this story before but here it is ( it comes from my Dad who is an organic chemist): The (pro)truckers were often in big trouble with their hands, showing some dermatitis, allergic reaction or skin cancer (I don't recall precisely). It get so important that that was acknowledged as a professional disease. Ok, but they can't tell why the truckers where affected. Until they looked closely to the habits and customs of the said truckers. And they found it. The truckers are very worried about their tyres (usually), it's understandable. So, after a travel, they used to keep a check on the tyre's temperature by putting an hand on them, a quick and easy test... and each time, they got on their skin a small amount of these chemicals. Moreover, the tyres were hot by the travel, so the chemicals penetrated easily in the skin. Day after day, weeks, months, years, the constant irritation messed their hands.
    56913 replies | 1747938 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Me, it's a mill envy.
    212 replies | 5147 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    He's RLfailuer and the previous thread on this was http://masterblasterhome.com/showthread.php?20586-TIP-Failure-results-in-broken-pelvis-and-broken-L5
    18 replies | 884 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    There's wear too, just at the contact point between the spring's hears and the clutch's masses. Both erode with the tiny but countless movements. That gives some slack in the mechanism and allow the clutch to engage a bit time to time. Test the mechanism, it should be held thigh by the springs and normally you don't be able to rock the parts by hand. If they rattle, you won't wait too long before a failure.
    11 replies | 293 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Instagram in Odds and Ends
    Small grinder or big, if the chain breaks or jumps, he will lost all his fingers. But more likely, the chain will freeze with the lack of oil and burn the motor.
    149 replies | 3480 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Have a good yank on the starter rope, there's a low limiter on the module and no spark will come out if the rev doesn't go over something like 600 rpm. It isn't easy to attain that while holding the spark plug on the engine block. Not sure about the actual number, but I had a hard time with that when I got my mix064-066 which was barely usable with its messed up ignition.
    26 replies | 537 view(s)
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    96 replies | 2175 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    I'm completely with Stig on that. I saw the tirade about God at the beginning of the Tree Climber Companion and I was shocked too. I was in great need of climbing knowledge and I kept reading the book though. But that left me a bitter taste in the mouth: how can you trust the book's contend and build your skill on it if the first thing written by the author is basically " no matter what I wrote after this preface, only the intervention of God will keep you alive" !!! Seriously!!!
    213 replies | 6792 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    See that : you yank a 20' lever, over head, often with the arms fully extended, eventually fighting a pinch or the wood coming loose. For that, you stand on a 4" wide area with nothing valuable to catch or step on if you loose your balance. Sure the second step is less dangerous than the last one, just because the device has a better stability itself low loaded. But still, you don't have anything to save you if you have to make an unexpected move. Putting back and low one foot may not suffice to recover your balance (if you can) and you are likely to trip against the bed's sides, then fall (backward) on the ground or on some surrounding thing, plastic, wood or steel. Oh, and then comes down the falling limb which seems to like sliding along the pole in this situation. Bad day... For the sharpness of the blade, even brand new, you can put a lot of time in a cut as Bermy said. If the pole is horizontal, the limb too and you cut perpendicularly in an area where the fibers are straight, then the blade cuts as fast as possible. A 6" limb begins to become a serious one though. If the pole is vertical or worse subvertical, the only pressure on the blade to sink in the wood is from your arms, which is nearly nothing with the 20' lever and the pole's wobble. And that's really nothing if your are at max reach. Add to that a pretty upward limb and you have to cut the fibers with a very acute angle, the teeth aren't designed for that. Lastly, if the access is tricky, the collar and its funny fibers can be the onliest point of the limb to cut in. Then good luck ! It's no more five minutes but more like half of an hour, or more. You want to cry, call Mommy and go home.:dead:
    106 replies | 2261 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Be sure that the throttle's spring has enough strength to pull it back. The small cord can get a lot of drag on the ground or by some shrubs if there's some length.
    7 replies | 326 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    The air flows around the obstacles with pressure waves and swirls. The ears are made to react at the pressure waves, because the sound is that. So, the ears are constantly beaten during the ride, either by the air flow and by the loud motor noise. Didn't you listen how quiet it becomes when you close the car's window? you feel almost in weightlessness. In a car, window opened, the head is about at the place where the air flow comes in the cabin after going round the windshield, and the left ear takes it first. It should be interesting to see if the "left drivers" get the same trouble but on the right side.
    56 replies | 1238 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I don't think that the force involved in splitting the vertical grain represents a major part of the whole, beside the folding force of the hinge and the leveraged force of lifting the tree. It seems secondary to me, excepted if the stump is a fiber's mess. But I agree with the risk of overcutting if one cuts until the tree falls alone or if the grain is twisted. The main difference between a low and a hight back cut (for me) is the actual pushing force of the wedge: - With a level backcut, the almost vertical force of the wedge is somewhat perpendicular to the plan between the back side and the hinge. That's the most favorable way to push, like a perpendicular rope is for pulling. So, the trunk rotates around the hinge with the less input. - With a hight backcut, the wedge pushes vertically the same way, but the hinge is way bellow. The back side - hinge plan is now at a very significant angle from the previous one and the efficiency of the push is reduced. It's the same effect in pulling a tree from the ground with an angled rope. The loss of force in rotating the trunk is redirected to stretching vertically the hinge, increasing the risk of busting the fibers and losing the tree.
    315 replies | 28925 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Q-tips as far as I recall. I elaborated a movement to have a good cleaning with that and to avoid any build up. But still, I have the high pitch continuously in both ears. Now, even with the computer'fans just near me and the electric heater rattling under my desk (I love the warm air flow coming up), I hear it distinctly. It's related to nerve damage. Sensitive terminators are damaged and that doesn't heal. Training the brain by feedback is an elegant solution : "just" tell the brain to not be bothered by that. You had to be really convincing !
    56 replies | 1238 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    A climb line in place, yes, but how long can it sustains the fire? It doesn't take much time to wreck the outer fibers. Then, put a heavy friction on it...
    6237 replies | 463454 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    No, not at all. The dutchman is basically a very narrow notch inside the usual notch, on a partial or full width of the hinge ( intended or not). The narrow notch, often just a kerf, closes early and redistributes the fulcrum point and the axis of the fall. In your cut, nipping the corner, even so deeply, doesn't change one bit the shape of the notch. It just makes the hinge narrower, that's all. With a well balanced tree, you won't see a difference in the fall, contrary to the dutchman. Your cut has nothing to do with a dutchman. I used the deep nipping on a 32" diameter beech which was close to a fence wall and I didn't have the room to place my chainsaw on the far side. Handy. The spar landed exactly where the hinge told it to do, no side move.
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I guess that hopefully the skidsteer was here again to save the day. Without it, this tree wouldn't have fallen on its own, or if it did, anywhere where it didn't have to. You blind yourself I you really believe that you manage a pool of special techniques. I don't argue with the special techniques, but with the idea of managing. I see here almost no control at all. Put all the care you can in what you do and forget the "that will be good enough like that", as said my grand father. Actually, that won't. Gabe can be proud of his work though, nicely done.
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    11-05-2017
    I don't recall the rule for the stitch's length, but I would make it length enough to cover a complete turn of the yarns, just to be sure that all of them are locked equally.
    24 replies | 1443 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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