• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Hours Ago
    Not to leash for me. At your wrist at least. But a tiny lanyard should be fine. Beyond the risk to drop the thing on the poor groundies, I would be more worried to not be easily able to put it away for whatever reason. You need all your hands available, eventually suddenly, to work your gear, keep your balance, catch a free falling chunk/limb... That could become a bad day if your hand is stuck with the pistol.
    21 replies | 308 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    14 Hours Ago
    I though on it during my breakfast. To be able to go down, maybe all you have to do is release the green bungees. Let the gravity works to put the springy strap on the downward position. If not, you stay in the ascend mode like a toothed cam on a rope. That involved some leg's work to loose the grip (up a little) and take it again (away of the trunk and down) though.
    80 replies | 1448 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    14 Hours Ago
    Maybe it just wear and they didn't bother to repair that. On my buddy's old chipper, both locks are completely destroyed by the vibrations and the cover rattles hard. I doubt that the hinges are in a much better shape.
    29 replies | 293 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread New toy! in Chainsaws!
    I don't like the light bar on my 200T. I mount only the heavy one. The light bar twists and bends in an angled/horizontal cut, only with the chainsaw's weight ! I can't see that as a well engineered part. Not enough sturdy.
    39 replies | 612 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Yes, but it's a pain in my area, until they'll put in place the optic fibers straight at home. I guess I'll have to wait a long time before I can see that. All I have is a rotten old copper line. You can see some water seeping out of the insulation ! They claim that they make a great deal to lay the optic fiber everywhere. Actually, it's far from the truth. But I know that involves huge investments. The main phone centers are equipped, they are connecting now the dense urban areas and big buildings. After, maybe, they will take care of the houses.
    28 replies | 358 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Don't lay the bumper logs along the driveway too close to it. A good hit can drive the logs into the ground, making a long hole but also bulging the ground around and raising part of the driveway. Often the trunk tends to move a little forward when it hits the ground. With the bumper logs, it can slide several feet on it. I broke a concrete curb (the 2" wide model) like that with an oak log. Second possibility, a crotch or a bump on the trunk can catch and push a log against the driveway during the slide. I've done that too...:D Well, I didn't laugh at the moment.
    34 replies | 428 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Yes, my first name is Marc. That's funny, we don't have the same scale of the things. First, you spoke about a light weigh trailer. Well, I see that, I have one. Then, it appears that it could be the 4400 lbs chipper !:O My light weigh trailer is (legally) 1100 lbs fully loaded:D
    571 replies | 43634 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Yes, but as is, it's too far away, the lever arm isn't in your favor. Keep the coupler inside the AT frame if possible, or just at the end at least. The two rear stake tubes may give you some troubles though with their height to make some sharp turns. They can't go easily under the trailer's tongue and will be in the way for maneuvering. The hand-truck behind should be as simple to modify and easier to use.
    571 replies | 43634 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    You should open a new thread, a "Pistol Grip Wrist Saving Arborist Tool 2" to continue the story about this one.
    80 replies | 1448 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    50 lbs ? And a top ? I know that's for testing, but you'll have some trouble to mend your wrist with such a load. You know the human mind, if something allows you to go bigger, faster, heavier, whatever ... as easily as previously, you go straight to the maximum allowed (and often more). Here, the limiting factor is what you can handle without too much pain. You designed a user friendly device which allow you to reduce the pain and the tear on the wrist. Good idea. But be sure that the average load taken by somebody will increase drastically, directly to a painful and armful level. I know very well that's what I would do in a day to day work. Humans aren't known to be reasonable.
    80 replies | 1448 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Yes, that surely would, but I didn't take this way because my very few attempts at inox welding weren't a great success. I didn't want to jeopardize this critical gear, so I stayed with what I can do reasonably well. Or actually not too badly, from a pro welder's point of view.
    31 replies | 681 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    What you can't say before hand is the effects of shocking and vibrating the pole. A small jerk on one point can easily be amplified by the length of the pole and the wires. Moreover, if the motion comes close to the resonance frequency of a component, it could become devastating, even if all the system is sound and well assembled. Remember what pounding wedge can do on a dead tree, or even the chainsaw vibrating the trunk.
    58 replies | 885 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Homemade Charcoal in MBTV
    I'm not sure, but the big barrel could act as an oven and maintain the heat more homogeneously around the small barrel. In a bonfire, the top of the small barrel wouldn't be as hot, with the flames swaying around and the fresh air coming viciously between them. The wood eats a lot of energy to be degraded. Even "dry", there is always water in it to put out, and the big molecules are hard to be demolished. So the temp could not be as height as it should. The gas produced is what burns on the wood, but the energy is freed all along the flames, with a big displacement of air. That's not good to focus on the work. More over, only the outside of a given flame is actually the fire, locally really hot admittedly, but inside the flame it's colder, deprived of oxygen with a lot of unburned gas (obviously, because that's it which burns on the outside when it finds the fresh air). The amount of oxidative and reductive areas is completely unpredictable in an open fire, so is the temp. You can either get some carbon deposits or burn your piece. An other point, the flames and the smoke are always in the way of the worker. The charcoal burns much more cleaner, you can approach it a little more and you can see clearly what's going on. Last point for the clean side, are the meat tasty when it's cooked on a burning bbq? hell no, it takes a bitter taste due to all the unburned gas and tar condensing on it.
    22 replies | 428 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    The answer is in the comments : And that too:
    8929 replies | 397926 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    So much energy stored just by the height of things, it's scary when we think on it. You made some really great shots, good idea the target acquired thing !
    3006 replies | 153233 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Careful with that ! Tip weight isn't the max weight at max lift, but the smallest load which makes the thing begins to fall on its nose. Due to the geometry of the arm mechanism, this point is roughly when the load is horizontal in relation to the first arm's articulation (put the arm's weight in the math). It can lift off the ground a little bit more, according to the geometry (the arm travels along part of a circle), but it never will pass the tipping point to get more height. Actually, the max load possible could be at the max height, check the geometry, but you can't get it there from the ground. Or if it's already there, you can't lower it down to the ground without tipping. (And never never drive with the load at max height). To illustrate that, there is a vid with a big log truck being unloaded by a giant loader. All the logs at once! He struggled a long time because even if he lifted the log's load off the trailer, barely, he can't pass the tipping point to lift enough to clear the ranchers, just in balance on the front wheels. Finally he succeeded, lifted the load all the way up so he can put the four wheels back on the ground and then went away.
    26 replies | 329 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I did one myself too when I began to climb. To protect it from the rust, I used a so called "galvanizing paint" in spray can. Nothing to do with real galvanization, it's only a paint heavily loaded with zinc dust. As I expected, the paint wore out real fast along the rope's path and on the contact points with the shackle. Too bad, but it seems that the rope's friction drags some zinc particles on the steel and that keeps protecting it, even if most of the paint is gone a long time ago. My porty never sleeps outside, but it sustains the rain better than my steel carabiners and delta link on my saddle.
    31 replies | 681 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    The stump seems 6 to 8" too hight to make the fell comfortable for you, overall with your angry back. Maybe it's the bad shape of the tree and you had to cut there, but you put more strain on your back by lifting the chainsaw above your waist level. Same with the backchaining, you have to push the saw away, drag it upward for the humbolt and take hits on your belly. A painful back doesn't appreciate that. Let the tree hold the saw and take the cut's forces. Beside that, I agree that the humbold is better in this situation though.
    46 replies | 1092 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread More Power Needed in Chainsaws!
    A sharp chain is mandatory but that's not enough. You need a lot of power and it comes only with the big saws. And even with them, it's a slow process, hard for the engine and the man. Cutting the fiber's end is the most energy eating cut. Every bit of wood cut out of the log is actually shredded and reduced to dust. The other ways to cut the wood give you chips or noodles where many of the fibers stay together and don't wast your energy to be separated. A small saw can work with a reasonable log's size, but only with the amount of energy delivered, which isn't much. You have to trade time against instantaneous energy. A thiner chain helps, because it needs less energy to cut through, as it removes less wood to make the kerf.
    68 replies | 1563 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    =D> Nicely done, but I agree for a full belts guard. First, it's mandatory in the industry to protect all the fast moving parts. Second, where the belts are located, they can catch all what you (don't) want, like chips, dirt, stones, twigs, grass, roots, pants, sleeves... Last, it's always a good thing to put the rubber out of the sun light. The good side of the thing, like that, the belts are very well ventilated.
    26 replies | 502 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    The powered spool is a good idea. Maybe a 600' spool is a bit too much for the trees outside Cali and Tasmania. But personally, I don't like a 500 lbs mass jumping and jerking in the human area. At all. There is enough hazard movements with all the limbs, logs and free falling dead wood, don't add an other source of worry and risk for the ground men. The climber can be put at risk too, because after going down, the limb/log can be pulled back up, following the jerking DAMS's movements. Strap it tight to the tree or to a ground anchor. Then, entrust the power (rewind, clutch, brake, chock absorber...) to an hydraulic system. It can be designed to follow every needs you can think of, eventually fully automated for the adjustment according to load and speed. It doesn't matter for you, but I would be extremely pleased to see such a system.
    27 replies | 344 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Fine control of the jaw's muscles, or they can easily shatter in pieces your teeth, which could be annoying for the survival. But the MUAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!! version is very tempting.
    53758 replies | 1498335 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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