• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    22 Hours Ago
    Thanks, I didn't know that.
    102 replies | 2973 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    22 Hours Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Yes, I was completely out of the root flare. The grain seemed straight to me, but it was cut by boring and not split though. So it's difficult to be sure. Thinking at it, maybe a slightly twisted grain could give this result, one side weakened splits and folds easily, the other reinforced by the propping effect by the cut fibers in front of the continuous ones doesn't want to split so easily.
    3165 replies | 173223 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    I tried the block face a few time on some small deciduous trees to test the enhanced folding capability, but I wasn't enthusiast with the results due to a collateral effect: Each time, I got exactly what I feared before hand, as the partial loss of the aiming's accuracy. Maybe I did something wrong, like too thin of a hinge, but the fibers split only at one side instead of all the width, following a triangular shape across the hinge ( bottom left to the top right of the vertical cut for example). It worked as if I made a slanted hinge and I get a substantial drift in my lay. This phenomenon should be less apparent with a big tree ( high of the block cut vs width of the trunk) but I would like to figure it out.
    3165 replies | 173223 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    I admit that's better to have it clipped at the saddle when it's time to take a ride after a cut.
    64 replies | 1533 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    I prefer the saw far from me, not in my legs, not in the space visited by my hands. It's less bulky on the saddle to go throw the limbs. When the ropes tangle with the saw, it's less likely to damage the ropes, because the saw isn't locked at the saddle, it can move somewhat and warns you before you make a good pull to free the rope (thinking that's only a twig). Only time to time, I wish to have a short holder, to avoid dragging the chain on the concrete, some stones or a roof.
    64 replies | 1533 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    The problem comes when the first occurs after the second.:D
    47 replies | 995 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    I guess that Pete Mctree means chainsaw's brands and not the chain / bar brand. The chain / bar mfg's interest is to supply all the market, but the chainsaw's brands doesn't want that their customers cheat on them, so they design their saws with specific dimensions and mounts. We can change the bar and the chain accordingly with what ever we want by some adaptation, but the stock models don't match.
    102 replies | 2973 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    But nevertheless, on your head is a better place to use it. Or may have I missed something ?:/: I loled at " I about shit a brick ":lol: Very close call.
    13 replies | 267 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Look at it from this point of view : forget the hinge, it isn't the fiber's pull which makes the trunk splits, but only the bending of the trunk. How much bending a particular tree / specie can tolerate is the concern. Find a way to avoid the excessive bending in the trunk and you will be all fine. Then come all the cuts and hinges things regard with the lean and internal cohesion forces. You can find different approaches between the advised techniques. - Hold it back or reduce the force by cutting out a good part of the crown, it won't barberchair even with a bad cut. - Cut it with a light saber, it can split partially by releasing the internal stress but you can't get a barberchair. So look at the speed cutting by side cuts and triangle cut (the one firstly presented in this thread). Boring the back cut belongs to this category too. - Weaken the wood at the base to avoid building up forces. Coosbay doesn't live much fibers at the compression area, they crunch under the increasing load and can't hold the low side of the trunk. At the same time, it plays with the lever arms too. Boring the face weakens the future tension side (when the saw will come in this area). Dissecting the cuts and looking precisely at their different effects in the process should be very interesting.
    54 replies | 1110 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    That's it, the lean, the lay and the notch "look "all to the same point. I just verified in the Dent's book, page 103. It's supposed to give less wood to cut at once on the back, so, speeding the cut. But I think that's a little tricky and you can just get the opposite of your goal. Because you need to cut the 3 kerfs perfectly in the same plane. If not, the chain has to cut again part of the already cut wood. Worse, if the chain is only partly engaged in the previous kerf(s), you can get a lot of drag/jam which slows the cut even more. You can very well win nothing, or loose it actually. That's perhaps not a big deal for a pro faller, but for a less trained treeman, that could.
    54 replies | 1110 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    20 trees falling on the ground in 1 minute is fun but very far from the reality. I like to see all the steps, taking the time to do things. Maybe not all in one vid and not in all vids, but it's a good way to grasp what makes your job. I'm more inclined to the technical side than the show off mode. And yes, the real sounds are attractive. Some musics can be add in back ground but which ones to choose is a difficult task and can't match all the people's likings. Some good vids are just ruined by too much music or the wrong one (for me). A nice editing can actually enhance the vid greatly, but I guess that's a real hard work to do well all the thing.
    64 replies | 1533 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    With so much compression forces, is reaming the cut an actual possibility?
    194 replies | 4182 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Stig spoke once about the major root pull he got to impress his crew and warn them against this danger. He himself was impressed:lol: It was a cut all the way back to outside, I think, but he didn't have the time to do so (as planned) and the ground exploded. I never experienced that. Looks fun if you don't like your saw too much. What I don't know is if a root pull could occur with the release cut by the outside as you said, maybe with a compromised stump (splitted or partially rotten). Otherwise, I think that grabbing the saw can be very possible if the release cut "above" isn't parallel to the bore cut and that ends with a bypass cut on a side. Not so likely with a level cut.
    194 replies | 4182 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I climbed in ashes today, on the side of a little field (almost bare) with two ponys. They were very happy with the limbs on the ground and made a feast with the leafs. Downside, they tried constantly to come in the drop zone.
    55074 replies | 1584303 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Me too, but I can't see how I could find this sort of answer in an encyclopedia. Perhaps I didn't practiced enough.
    34 replies | 994 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    If you want to sew it, take care to not sew the protective layers with the outer fabric. They have to be free to work properly : the chain catches the fibers, pulls them out and makes a mess around the sprockets / clutch. If the fibers are held tight by a sewing or even filth, salt, oil ... they stay where they are, the chain just cut through and nothing good happens.
    31 replies | 755 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Beside the short term effects, there's the long term effect : a repeated exposure of your skin (moreover likely damaged) with a very close contact of the nasty tar's substances, added to a heavy massage (good penetration): tumors, cancers...
    24 replies | 360 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    It's ok to sew the external fabric, to patch it... to duck-tape it if you want, but don't play with the protective layers. You can put the nicked or worn pants, chaps, gloves, sleeves ... under the chainsaws and the oil/gas cans to soak up the leaks. About that, I have a pant which begins to become really stupid:D
    31 replies | 755 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Yes at the stump, not at a crotch between two co-leaders if you locked the butt above the cut. At the outside half of both axis at a crotch, the grain is tighter but still pretty straight. The split is a little more difficult but very doable, unlike the sides and the central part of the crotch. I you prevent the trunk splitting upward, there's a great possibility that an other split tries its chance downward the crotch.
    194 replies | 4182 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Don't forget that aloft, the trunk can easily split downward if the upward side is locked. Not good if you're lanyarded on it. My buddy took a good ride downstairs on an ash due to that.
    194 replies | 4182 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Brian, I think that you misread this point. For me, he doesn't say to replace every hoses preventively every year or two, but to replace at this rate those previously identified as a potential risk during the successive monthly inspections, like a minor damage or an out-of-date hose. If it still works, you aren't in a hurry but keep an eye at it and do them all at once. That's less down time and less cost for a preventive maintenance than jumping on the thing every month. Of course, that doesn't apply to a curative action on a seriously damaged hose.
    22 replies | 369 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    That's it. The jug is sturdy enough to sustain a differential pressure inside/outside. A plastic bag doesn't work for that (actually it does but with a very very little amount). It's a matter of balance between the air pressure plus the water height of both the outside and inside of the jug. When the pet drinks the water, the outside level gets to zero and there's only the atmospheric air pressure on the outside at the communication point. Inside, it's the same global pressure, but divided between the air and the water's height. The water's weight drags it toward the bottom. So the inside air pressure is less than the outside, sucking the water up. If the pet drink enough to uncover the gap, the air can find its way toward the inside while the water tries to flow out. A bubble appears inside and goes up, rising the (negative) pressure. That allows some water to go out, decreasing the water's weigh/heigh to recover the balance point. If there's only a tiny hole as the entrance point, all stays put because the air doesn't have enough room to push the water aside. No air can come in and no water can come out as is. Then, one way to get water is to decrease the external pressure by sucking at the hole. The pressure inside becomes higher relatively and pushes the water out. You just got the principle of the feeding bottle. There are some other ways, like blowing in the hole, shacking or squeezing the bottle, rising the temperature ... You can get as big a jug as you want, many cubic meters, it doesn't change the principle. The onliest limitation is the water's height : it isn't allowed to go over 10 meters. But that would give you some margin, even for the cows. Don't forget the sturdy thing to make an overseized model. Even a small pressure can create some massive forces. Beside that, some trials are required to find the right size for the gap and get enough flow for a bunch of thirsty cows.
    55074 replies | 1584303 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    137 replies | 2636 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Damaged Chain? in Chainsaws!
    No, it would be just broken in. :D It's like the disk brakes on the cars. I change the clutch sprocket when the chain runs roughly and it becomes difficult to find a good setting for the tension. That gives a beat-like movement, alternating loose and thigh chain at each drive link (hand moving). On the 20 " + bars, I had only one worn out nose sprocket. It was a low cost bar. Usually, the rails are dead before. It's a little different for the ms 150T : the nose sprocket is very fragile and gives up too quickly. I don't even try to dress the rails when I see that the aluminum rivet begins to lift its edges. After that, it doesn't take long for the ball bearing inside to fall apart.
    53 replies | 977 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Actually, even without curling the file, you wear the second half of the file when you sharpen the other side of the chain. Excepted if the chain is badly rocked on one side. In this case, only half of the file is trashed, the other half is still good. You win an half file:/:
    102 replies | 2973 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Damaged Chain? in Chainsaws!
    You guys, you write too quick for me ;)
    53 replies | 977 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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