• treelooker's Avatar
    03-10-2017
    Cmon Jon; you know better than that.
    13 replies | 2786 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    11-19-2016
    That wasn't a letter; it was a book! But I tried to reply respectfully, even if his logic wasn't clear. Seemed more like faith than belief. Funny that the reply was 14 pages later.
    9 replies | 1248 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    11-16-2016
    Yeah we'll see what their next move is. I kinda doubt the case will turn on science or economics, but power.
    9 replies | 1248 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    11-14-2016
    Yesterday I climbed a baldcypress that is under transmission lines so it's in an ongoing court battle. The tree's response to last year's pruning puts the lie to the myth that reduction cuts to buds and small laterals aka "footing cuts" will trigger wild sprouting and rampant decay. Last June I told their lawyers the pruning would provide 5 years' clearance and so far that looks about right. They may still try to make a case for removal but this evidence will not favor their cause. In the last pic, it's the L-shaped tree on the right.
    9 replies | 1248 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    11-10-2016
    Just the outer ends for now. I'm still wondering why (or if?) they will remove the trunk. Lots of concrete = $$$$$
    21 replies | 1285 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    11-01-2016
    Yup. The hydrology changes were telling. I hope to get the report released soon; interesting story to tell. The NYTimes did not publish my letter, or a correction of any kind. :(
    21 replies | 1285 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    10-24-2016
    No soil treatments in recent history that I know of. That 100' datum was erroneous. Site conditions had changed over the years. Less root area, different hydrology.
    21 replies | 1285 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    10-20-2016
    That conclusion came from the pattern of dieback and advancement of hypoxylon and armillaria, and previous experience with white oaks subject to sudden summer flooding. That, and the total lack of any other cause that fit the evidence.
    21 replies | 1285 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    10-17-2016
    o aND Dear Editor, It was good to read James Barron's report on the Basking Ridge Oak (600-year-old-oak-tree-finally-succumbs). In early August I climbed and inspected the tree together with Mr. Gillies, and wrote the final report. The article told the tree's story well, but for one small detail. Old white oak trees typically respond to heat and drought by closing off their pores to conserve water. The pores (stomata) in the leaves regulate transpiration. Trees can also plug up vessels in "the rings deep inside, behind the bark" to prevent the spread of disease, but this process is not a response to drought. The article was right on the ultimate result: the tree died because it could not process a sudden influx of water after a period of drought. Thanks to the Times for covering the passing of this historic tree. For more information on the diagnosis and prognosis, see historictreecare.com. *****************************
    21 replies | 1285 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    10-16-2016
    This was the saddest aerial inspection I have ever done. A fruitless search for signs of arboreal life. I'm surprised they are talking about taking the whole thing down. Leaving the bottom 20' as a vine prop seemed like a good idea. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/17/nyregion/a-600-year-old-oak-tree-finally-succumbs.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share Nice to see the tree's story conveyed accurately. Good work by Rob Gillies explaining what finally did the old girl in. {the tree responded to the initial “heat stress” by closing off the pores in the rings deep inside, behind the bark. “These shut down, so it doesn’t transpire,” he said. “Then it was inundated” by almost 12 hours of heavy rain. “The roots were soaking because it couldn’t process the water,” he said.}
    21 replies | 1285 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    10-16-2016
    Has anyone taken this 3-day course? Or the 1-day survey course? https://www.lantra.co.uk/awards/prod...ion-ita-course
    2 replies | 215 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    09-12-2016
    ...from an awesome guy: https://www.amazon.com/Praise-Plants-Francis-Halle/dp/1604692626
    16 replies | 1233 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    09-03-2016
    Also happens due to girdling roots.
    14 replies | 1060 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    09-03-2016
    "Crown shyness" is what Francis Halle' calls it. Avoid contact between plants in high wind; that can send signals thru the whole plant. Before you prune on that oak any more, you might want to make a long term plan.
    16 replies | 1233 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    06-27-2016
    Did something spill? Maybe dig and check the soil and roots under the dead branches.
    10 replies | 1615 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    06-21-2016
    Bob yes it does refer to line clearance. The transition from roundover pruning has been painful. utilities used to do more of a "U-Cut", clearing only a short distance below the wires. Then some began to deep-dive, taking off branches way below the lines, and even below the bundle of communications wires. This results in huge wounds, imbalance, and high risk, which are worsened after sprouts are removed on the next visit. I'm trying to encourage a return to U-cutting, and directional pruning on the regrowth. The pushback is fierce, but no one can tell me why V-cutting way beyond clearance limits (MVD) is necessary, or even desirable. I'm afraid that Alex might be spinning cartwheels if he saw cuts like this made in his name!
    15 replies | 957 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    06-20-2016
    I've been pruning trees for 50 years, but just heard this term for the first time. Anyone know what it means? Never saw where Shigo used the term, but i might have missed something.
    15 replies | 957 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    05-12-2016
    Why?
    57 replies | 4022 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    05-07-2016
    Now's a great time!
    57 replies | 4022 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    04-28-2016
    Spyder returns...awesome!
    14 replies | 1035 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    03-25-2016
    Yes coppicing the maple good idea. Pistache shows good scar tissue on both sides of sunscaled. Both trees have major root issues. Find the flare.
    22 replies | 1978 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    03-08-2016
    ok got it, but ime a pruning cycle can be 5 years min on average. And yeah the bottom line is tree value; the owner's gotta see it or our job is tough.
    15 replies | 2157 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    03-02-2016
    Thanks for the replies. This was based on a followup inspection of mature street trees http://www.historictreecare.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Mature-Willow-Oaks-Managed-with-Specified-Crown-Reduction.pdf pruned in 2012. Would another city with a similar population of trees budget for pruning? After looking at a 68:1 or even 34:1 ratio for the cost of replacement vs. retention, I tend to think so; that's why I'm trying to do the arithmetic. We'll see. Yes a 5-year cycle would be better; that would change the cost ratio to 34:1? But based on inspection, imo the trees in question won't need much pruning until 2022, after their 2012 reduction/retrenchment/regeneration pruning. O and the work was done by a non-certified arborist who lacked verbal skills (tried 4 times) but learned quickly and understood trees very well. He was much easier to work with than certificants who are deluded into believing that the 'rules of thumb (or dumb...)' taught by ISA are facts. Nick your pruning cycle is really short--why? The goal was to look at the next 40 years. The trees will live indefinitely, so yes Carl I did not try to compute beyond 40 years. And I totally agree that trees can be reduced until they are stumps. After all that is what happens in nature; a gradual retrenchment. How can we go wrong copying nature?
    15 replies | 2157 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    02-29-2016
    Remove or Retain? Keep or Kill? I'm doing ta cost/benefit analysis involved in these decisions, on street trees for instance. So far it looks like pruning a tree is 68 times cheaper than replacing it. In very general numbers. if it cost $500 to prune a mature tree, and it needs pruning again in 10 years, pruning costs $50 or 5000 pennies per year. The branches cover a circle that is 80 feet wide, roughly 5000 square feet of canopy per tree.That comes out to an expense of 1 penny per square foot of canopy per year to retain the tree. It might cost $2,500 to remove the tree, dispose of the debris, and grind the stump. A new tree might cost $500 to put in, and grow at a rate of one foot per year. It would need water and mulch and fertilizing and weeding and pruning for 40 years, at maybe $10/year, or $400. That is a total of $3400, or $340,000 pennies to put back that 5000 square feet of canopy. That comes out to 68 pennies per square foot of canopy. Then we would have to add in the cost of the loss in contributions for the 40 years without the canopy, and the cost of the use of the money it takes to replace it. Does this seem close? Did I forget anything?
    15 replies | 2157 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    02-29-2016
    delete; duped!
    0 replies | 264 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    02-15-2016
    ID what, the fungus? Can't really tell what's going on; why that section was cut off, etc. No need to make guesses about root conditions. Dig and inspect! I see no brackets, and can't judge the expansion of fungal spread, if any.
    6 replies | 626 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    02-14-2016
    A blunt hand tool peels, scrapes away dead material so you can see the tree's response, and the extent of potential issues. Diagnosis requires more than watching, which is a course of INaction. Diagnosis requires cleaning. Lack of knowledge does not require anything!
    10 replies | 990 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    02-11-2016
    So it just went away? Thanks for the followup. That orange stuff sure looks like callus turning into woundwood. the cracking bark to the left indicates that it is dead, from the same physical injury. In ALL cases, removing all non-living material from an area of concern is the best way to learn what's going on. 1 minute with a screwdriver could tell a lot here.
    10 replies | 990 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    02-06-2016
    Gummosis is not always bacterial or infectious. This looks like a pine pitching at wound margins. Scrape under the 'grease'--that looks like callus tissue.
    10 replies | 990 view(s)
  • treelooker's Avatar
    01-23-2016
    If sounding reveals a big hollow, then drilling may be justified. But digging may give better info on root crowns. Ps, tough pest!
    7 replies | 2723 view(s)
More Activity

1 Visitor Messages

  1. View Conversation
    No, I am in the Chicagoland area. Kewanee is about 150 miles from here.
Showing Visitor Messages 1 to 1 of 1
About treelooker

Basic Information

About treelooker
Location:
NC
Interests:
Advocating for Trees
Occupation:
Advocatus pro Arbora

Signature


Trees connect Earth, and mankind, to the heavens.
For health, symbiotic associates are assisted. For structure, pests like decay are resisted.
Trees coexist with people and fungi, inexorably and indefinitely, instilling immortality. www.historictreecare.com

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
2,229
Posts Per Day
0.51
Visitor Messages
Total Messages
1
Most Recent Message
08-09-2012
General Information
Last Activity
07-02-2017
Join Date
07-24-2005
Referrals
0
Home Page
http://www.bettertreecare.com