• August Hunicke's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    I know Butch. Was something I used to believe tho. Aug
    4809 replies | 154760 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Yes, haha, and drunk drivers should have their own lane with high walls and no emergency response. Aug
    4809 replies | 154760 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    August Hunicke replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    I?m not ruffled lol. Just interested. Didn?t know I sounded like Reg. ;P Aug
    3495 replies | 211992 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    August Hunicke replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Am I dry unanimated barely awake? wowza. Aug
    3495 replies | 211992 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    August Hunicke replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    https://youtu.be/jU5qXLG-5JI Aug
    3495 replies | 211992 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Clarence, I think he was being framed. Lauer, guilty, I mean, isn?t he a liberal. Liberals are always perved out and you gotta be waaaaay perv to be ?exposed? by your perved peers from the bowels of pervtopia. Actually, I will say this, anyone wrongfully accused of sex crimes must suffer about the same or worse as sex crime victims. . . So on that note, I best not condemn. Aug
    2352 replies | 145031 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    August Hunicke replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Those live feeds are chaotic. Plus trolls come out of the woodwork to say stupid sh*t cause it?s live. Aug
    3495 replies | 211992 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    August Hunicke replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    https://youtu.be/0xsBNwYlA7E Aug
    3495 replies | 211992 view(s)
  • August Hunicke's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    August Hunicke replied to a thread August Hunicke Videos in MBTV
    Thanks Tree Community Aug
    3495 replies | 211992 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I'm going home Are contractions allowed
    245 replies | 4279 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Tree is down
    245 replies | 4279 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    YA... post some pics of your stumps (anybody) and we'll compare
    6 replies | 292 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    ANyone remember this thread started by Kenny in July 2002.. https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/dent-on-hinging.4451/ He was trying to explain a concept that you probably understand now if you've been paying attention to the forums... But back then it wasn't well understood outside of the logging world... He caught a ton of shit from small minded arbs that couldn't get out of their boxes.. I sure AM glad he kept at it anyway And pretty sure there are a bunch of people learning from the heated discussions that seem to follow many of my posts... I put $5,800 worth of locust trees on the ground today from two sets of the bucket in about 5 hours... I didn't do that by operating in a box..... the last tree I reduced from 2300 to 1800 because the little old lady who owned the house was on a fixed income and she asked nicely.. Her son in law told me she got a price of 2,700 six years ago... Tree as on the ground in a little over an hour... If you look closely you can see the tree ended up falling left of the hinge, that top was one big heavy locust lead hanging over the house
    6 replies | 292 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Agreed, Kenny you have been my teacher and pried open a heavy door to allow a few rays of light through which has become a whole new world for me, full of beauty and wonder. I will always be grateful to you for the effort you made to show us a new perspective when this industry was so stuck in first gear..... In the end tree work, like martial arts, should be an expression of truth.. To do it well you must ask the question "who AM I?" To answer that question we all must look at the assumptions that we consider to be true. Begin to question everything in your life... And in the way you do tree work.. Why to you use a humboldt., why do you cut a notch as deep and wide as you do?: why do you rig and rope the way you do... You may find that the answer to many of these questions is because that's the way you were taught or that's the way I've always done it.. Or I never thought about it, just seems to work so why change ... etc... I call that inside the box .... For me the juice is always outside the box.... I love it out here!
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    of course, which can be A LOT and often then ends up in the back cut being over-cut and as soon as it bypasses the notch the weight of the tree crushed the no-existent hinge and sits on the bar and traps it.
    315 replies | 28925 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CgCdsERkqrc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> Knowledge is the tool box for creativity.... If you don't fully understand the basics, how are you going to transcend them..
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    with a petroleum explosion of 3000 degrees maybe... but certainly would have offered more protection in this scenario... I use the ugly gloves and they work well around a campfire...
    6237 replies | 463380 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    If he had been wearing a pair of gloves he would have been better able to handle the burning pieces.. People often overlook gloves as an important piece of PPE. I don't work without them.. I always like to take spark arresters out... don;t need them around here... Out in Cali is different.. could lite the grass up... never thought you light up a palm like that
    6237 replies | 463380 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    only asking cause I see that day coming for me on the horizon....
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    How's that feel???
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    when was your last rodeo?
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    C'mon Butch, Got anything to ad here? You made the move from climber to bucket op... did you change your game?
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Ya , what was that about... Was that the one where you were trying to say that the outer fibers have more holding strength than the center fibers... or maybe that was woodworking boy... honestly I have a terrible memory for these things... in any case... you don't seem to have any intelligent criticisms of the cuts or techniques discussed here, so you just throw some mud at the bearer... Its an old political trick.... when the facts and logic don't support your case, throw a personal attack out there...So what else do you have????
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Actually not just hard to reach... it was impossible to reach ... unless I was going to put the bucket and boom across the front of the hinge, which could only be done to start the back cut. Even then it would require a time consuming and unnecessary re-positioning of the bucket.... While flushcut may still think this is a lazy man's cut, I would venture a guess that he doesn't use a bucket much... One of the main differences between climbing and using a bucket is the bucket's lack of mobility, often forcing the op to cut and rig in a way that would not be required from rope and saddle. Working from the bucket is a little more of a head game due to those limitations.. I'll often switch up the rigging points with redirects and satellite rigging points, multiple times that a climber would have to work a lot harder to achieve. And creative rigging is often needed to keep the bucket and boom out of the rigging path when a climber could just shimmy over to the other side of the tree to make the cut. Because climbing is such a physically demanding part of the job, there is a major focus on the climbing aspect of tree work, and rightly so. Lots of focus on climbing gear and technique. This focus seems to have overshadowed the cutting and rigging techniques among arborists... That's evident from the forums and youtube videos.. (Obviously where there are loggers involved the focus is going to be more on falling / cutting techniques) When movement is so fast and easy with the bucket, the focus on climbing skills and gear goes to zero, and then all that's left (other than bucket placement) is cutting and rigging techniques.. It's a new and different game. Though it might not look much different to the untrained, it has been for me. There are a lot of climbers that never got to make the switch because they never had access to a bucket. I AM always looking for the fastest, safest easiest way to get a job done. SO I have put a lot of focus on cutting and rigging... It's keeps it interesting for me after all these years. I try to reduce the total number of cuts I make and save time on every cut I do make.. Seconds add up to minutes, minutes ad up to hours, hours ad up to days, days up to weeks... Over time it makes a huge difference.. And faster is often safer and offers options to situations that could otherwise be very dangerous. The trees in my market are big enough to push the limits of a 75' bucket. I'll often have to rig big stuff in a way that wouldn't be needed by a climber. It's rare that I use a crane on a tree that I can get the bucket to. Lot of other guys don't think like that. They'll just bring in the crane anytime they get something that pushes the limits of the bucket. I know one of the guys that bid on this tree. He has a 75' bucket too, but was planning on a second day with the crane, after taking what brush he could with the bucket. I almost had this tree down in a day. So it might be worth having a discussion on the difference between lazy and efficient... I could show plenty of the standard, by the book, boyscout approved stuff. I do it all day long.. after 30 years it's automatic. I don't bother posting it ... I'd rather show and discuss out of the box techniques. Which may seem threatening to the less skilled.. Until you have the basics mastered, going outside the lines cold be very dangerous in this business.
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    This ius another short bar hinge, with a 25" bar.... that's a roof in the background... big ass cut at 30' and a good example of a cut that was hard to reach from both sides with the bucket
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    After a hurricane I explain to homeowners that they have PTSD, and they are just freaked out right now and wait at least 6 months to make a decision on the tree, and if they still want it down they can have it done then, because after all the tree just made it through a hurricane. It's not going anywhere.. Doesn't always work, but i think using the word PTSD is helpful so they can realize its more about them than the tree.....
    14 replies | 458 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Not quite there Bermy.. Its the inverted shelf and the mirrored dutchman... the latter of which I posted a few pics on here some time ago .....
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Most of the time that is what happens... you can get away with removing the end of the hinge on one side, , leaving it unbalanced, and it will still go to the lay... HOWEVER, every once in a while it doesn't.. I've seen them turn ... its very unpredictable... Had a big chestnut oak spar turn do it. with a gorgeous straight hinge, all except I took 3" off the far end. Was a 28" bar, so you;d think that taking such a little bit of the end wouldn't matter much... threw the lay off a few degrees, maybe as much as 10... spar clipped an existing stump in the yard, which made it roll hard and fast, right into the house, very minor crack to the foundation... owner was cool, but that could have been costly.... So lesson learned... Then I tried to use it to on purpose to turn trees during he fall... It;s very unreliable, and I never did figure out what variables made it work or not.... The unreliability is why it was discouraged from practice by the loggers. do it 100 times and see if they all go to the lay.... drawing conclusions from one cut is not recommended.. And the term dutchman is pretty broad... This cut certainly qualifies... If we are going to converse intelligently, we need to define our terms..
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Nipping the sides is generally done to prevent a string of twisting bark from ripping down the trunk under the notch and causing that side of the hinge to hold on, which can throw the fall far off the lay.... the mirrored dutchman looks kinda like that, but has a different application... "Nipping the corners" is particularity important in some species.. Hemlock comes to mind here... And this is another reason where a high stump shot can cause trouble... the larger the differential between the backcut and the floor of the notch, the greater the chance that twisting grain can cross over under the notch... A wider notch lessens the potential effect of the above to change the direction of fall... After the tree picks up a lot of speed and momentum, what happens after the face closes is not going to have as much effect... Also the size of the piece matters, the smaller it is, the greater the chance of the corners holding and pulling it off the lay, so nipping the corners is often used more in the air than on the ground...
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Basically... here it is.. It's called the mirrored dutchman (just named it this morning) Its a technique used for cutting with a short bar on trees where limited control is needed from the hinge... basically trees with little or no side lean/side-weight. Benefits... its quick and easy and allows the faller to stay on one side of the tree, which is particularly useful when applied from the bucket, where mobility may be limited. Put that one in your bag of tricks
    190 replies | 6226 view(s)
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About murphy4trees
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I've been cutting trees since graduating college in the early 80's. My son is the best person I know. I believe in doing the right thing,
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Philadelphia PA suburbs
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spiritual realization, holistic health, nutrition, music, dance, love, truth
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