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  • MasterBlaster's Avatar
    41 Minutes Ago
    Interesting info, guys!
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • MasterBlaster's Avatar
    50 Minutes Ago
    Interesting use of a climb line. I always just stomped on up...
    173 replies | 3767 view(s)
  • Maximalist's Avatar
    3 Hours Ago
    Diogenes
    402 replies | 6202 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    4 Hours Ago
    Nice Eric. Still got plenty spring in your step :thumbup: Did you limb the tree first, set the climb line, then start the video where you're spurring back up ? Was somebody tending you climb line as you spurred back up ? Thanks
    173 replies | 3767 view(s)
  • Porkbrick's Avatar
    4 Hours Ago
    Porkbrick replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    i voted for bolts in the end product. Rock Thompson was in favor of keeping the bolts. it basically boils down to liability and making the fasteners as tamper proof as possible. the guys in charge of that stuff get pretty nervous about having people taking stuff apart. when we first started negotiating way back i was expecting that they would go that way.i do like how sleek rivets will look and they are for sure stronger than a bolt of the same size. as far as servicing or parts replacement i look at it a few ways. for one, there is no reason to remove any of the bolts in the spine if the cams can be removed without doing so. for two the cams only need replacing if they last less than the safe lifespan of the tool and i think, with the adjust-ability of the akimbo and the right materials, they can last. as of right now we've made the cam axles of a design that allows the cams to be removed without disassembling the whole device. i doubt i will ever convince them to make it an end user replaceable part, but it will be replaceable. i obviously am a guy who likes tampering with his own gear, and i know there are lots of guys like me out there, but i can understand why it makes their legal dept very nervous when you start talking about tinkering.
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • Steve Mack's Avatar
    4 Hours Ago
    anarchism
    402 replies | 6202 view(s)
  • Mick!'s Avatar
    6 Hours Ago
    Great stuff Erik, just the job before going off to work this morning!
    173 replies | 3767 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    6 Hours Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    Here you go Kevin, yeah they are pretty handy lol. When it reaches proper torque the spline breaks off, so it's automatically torqued to spec. Can't possibly mess it up. The rigging they used to do before cranes became what they are is also truly amazing.
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • Cobleskill's Avatar
    6 Hours Ago
    Cobleskill replied to a thread Firewood in The Logging Forum
    I am amazed they market the SS. Seems the idiots that sue would have them broke by now. I would love to try one.
    183 replies | 11759 view(s)
  • kevin bingham's Avatar
    6 Hours Ago
    what do you mean by a smaller sized spline? I'm trying to picture the one person's bolt. that sounds like a definite revolutionary breakthrough
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • kevin bingham's Avatar
    6 Hours Ago
    that's interesting! it makes sense, that was an actual trade being a riveted. It is clear that rivets are stronger and more aesthetic as well. my complaint with them is that you can't swap out parts. for me, aluminum is a preferable friction surface, but it wears quickly. with rivets you must use steel which is heavier and it still wear. to be able to swap out aluminum wear pieces is nice. or even have different pieces maybe for different rope classes. The ART products are serviceable which is nice. one of the problems with the unicender which is an amazing tool is that it wears quickly and not serviceable. but at the end of the day, maybe that's a good thing... people have to just pony up and buy another.
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    7 Hours Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    Actually rivets are superior in just about every way. They fill the entire void, are impossible to accidentally remove, and provide a larger cross section (are stronger). Bolts offer a sharp edge which will wear into the plate, have nuts that can come off accidentally due to bolt stretch or loading cycles (or improper torque like the Buckingham lanyard), and are smaller in cross section with less holding ability. You use stuff that's riveted everyday, and never think twice about it because it works so well (saw chain for example). The reason bolts are so common with building stuff comes from ironworking. Back in the day everything was riveted, which required a certain number of people to do properly. If the crew didn't know what they were doing and didn't fully line up the plates, a weakened joint would occur, so you actually needed skilled workers that demanded good pay. Eventually metallurgical controls got to the point that a bolt could be cheaply made and would have a strength acceptable for using in this particular application. So they told everyone hey we got this newish thing that is better, so we're going to use it from now on. Bolts were undeniably weaker, but were easier to model using mathematical equations so engineers could determine the strength of the connections and would just oversize them to get the desired strength. It was easier to do in the field, so you no longer needed to pay top scale, because anyone can torque a bolt. They have advanced it now to where one guy is needed because the bolt has a smaller size spline at the end that a hydraulic torque wrench uses to keep the bolt from spinning, so you don't need a guy in the other side to hold back the bolt from spinning. They dumbed down the trade to achieve a lower labor cost, and that combined with the advances of cranes led to the decline of the ironworker profession.
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • rico11764's Avatar
    7 Hours Ago
    Fun little 175 ft Redwood we chunked down for milling. Spurring up to first limb at 125 ft. Taking a 40 ft top at 135ft. Wedging over an 18 ft log at 85 ft. Gonna edit the while job into a video latter this week. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GWlMOIznFbI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xmZQNIieQCg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Kjsk163OTfY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    173 replies | 3767 view(s)
  • treebilly's Avatar
    7 Hours Ago
    treebilly replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    I like nuts and bolts as well. They make for more serviceable parts, provided they are able to be purchased. Of course many of my Chevy parts are held Together with rivets but replacements are bolted on.
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • kevin bingham's Avatar
    8 Hours Ago
    I agree with the rivets thing. it seems no one in the manufacturing or retail world is a fan of the end user being able to disassemble their products. But I agree, I like nuts and bolts. I have had a hard time pushing that point to manufacturers outside of cmi. but to me, that's one reason why CMI sells more pulleys than anyone.
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
  • MasterBlaster's Avatar
    8 Hours Ago
    Mighty big tip, for sure!
    56508 replies | 1719272 view(s)
  • Burnham's Avatar
    8 Hours Ago
    Burnham replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    I cannot disagree with anything in Tim's post. I look forward to your reply, J.
    1145 replies | 78333 view(s)
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