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  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    9 Minutes Ago
    Nice find! Seems people love 066s.
    7277 replies | 429726 view(s)
  • Raj's Avatar
    11 Minutes Ago
    Raj replied to a thread O.C.G.D. Thread, part two in Gear Forum
    Picked up an 066 today.
    7277 replies | 429726 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    27 Minutes Ago
    Pole tools have their valuable place, but it can mean somewhat getting under something, and releasing it from the tree. Sometimes you can direct the falling piece away from you. Dodging stuff, and falling at any age sucks. In your 60's, it's a BIG deal. My friend tripped in a little hole, end result ... restarting his heart three times, a month later. Internal bleeding that went undetected when his ribs broke, a month earlier. Hasn't been the same since. That's why I mentioned the throw line. I can set a lot of stuff with a throw line, saving polesaw work and dodging, climbing, etc. Line setting with a throwline is a developed skill, which you can practice easier than face-cuts. Its so important for working smarter, IMO. This cherry tree was under a huge fir tree, so it taller than it looks, probably 35-40' to the tip top. Next to a wire fence, with an apple tree on the far side, and the garden fence out of frame to the right. Not enough room to fell in the direction where I was standing. Lots of sidelean, anyway. I hung it in about 5 minutes of throw lining, pulling in the rope, choking the Cherry with a running bow line, taking a wrap around the trunk. Its cut off the stump at about 4.5'. I cut what I could easily reach, lowered it a bit more, cut a bit more, lowered it down to the ground. 10-15. A throw line/ cube is so light, cheap, versatile, productive, etc, etc. No pole saw was used in the takedown of this tree. All cutting was done pulling a trigger.
    49 replies | 877 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    34 Minutes Ago
    I like straight forward.
    66 replies | 949 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    36 Minutes Ago
    You guys have had hard leaning straight-grained trees start to pop and crack when cutting, right? Crotches/ interruption in the grain limits this, clear, straight grain exacerbates this tendency to split. Which would you rather cut, hard leaning knotty wood, or straight grained clear wood?
    66 replies | 949 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    57 Minutes Ago
    Side note: I deal largely with conifers and straight limbed Deciduous trees, like Maple and alder, some Birch, etc. Loading: One short wall/ 4' plywood on far side. Nothing on near side. Load height about 16" off ground. Toss/ Stack limbs oriented front to back, against far wall. It will build a slope. "Chainsaw chipper" as needed, cutting cross wise. If you accidentally hit the walls or wood floor, they don't damage the chain. Don't stand on uncut branches to reduce saw binding. Be careful about fire with lots of dry, dead material and binding/ hot muffler. I start at the front or back, standing outside the trailer for two cuts, then climb in the trailer onto cut brush. Keep thick branches out. These go on top when you're done slashing, and can help to unload later. When needed add the near side stake pocket side boards. Load height about 3'. Add near side's 4' plywood before it becomes difficult to do so. Load height from side, about 5'+, from rear/ front 3'. The brush starts to add up, but as you continue to "chainsaw chip" it magically shrinks. There is probably around 1500+# of limbs in the trailer. At another terrible-access waterfront (stEEP, mossy driveway & tiny parking area down at house), I had 2000#. I do it this way (when necessary) because I don't have a way to anchor the load (rope to tree or other truck), and drive out from under it, as the green waste sites are situated. When I am significantly full, I'll tarp the load and strap around the frame. This sucks the top of the walls inward, supporting them. If not very full, sometimes I just use lighter duty ratchet straps from plywood top to other side plywood top. Holes are pre-drilled for hooks. These holes can also be used for a rope handle or ratchet straps for dragging plywood at a job site. When I offload, I rotate the plywood out on a corner, not lift it out. Soooo much easier. Then the next 3 plywood sheets. If you have long straight limbs, you may be able to push through the brush pile, and roll the brush off, somewhat, but that works much better with uncut limbs. Once I'm approaching the end of the brush to load, I stop cutting it up. That goes super fast with two guys, maybe three, with some sort of lever, we can sometimes roll it off, all at once. You might just push/ pull with a steel rake/ pitch fork etc to unload. When enough load is off, I push the lower wall in with my hip, and pull up on the stakes until the sides pop off. Then unload as easily as possible, one way or the other. I'll usually unload some, then drive forward. Unload the rest. I'm mindful of tire/ wire damage. Never had a problem. 5x10', 4 side panels. Bought the flatbed, home made, converted boat trailer with winch for $300. Add stake pockets and chain hooks $100. $200 in new tires this year. New ball coupler 2 years ago. Owned it 9 years. Looking to replace it soon. I've invested in other equipment over time, instead of a newer trailer that looks better. I
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • MasterBlaster's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    Nah, just get up there and get it done. You can't always have a nice tie-in.
    56069 replies | 1692653 view(s)
  • MasterBlaster's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    This is a BS
    49 replies | 877 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    72 replies | 1316 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    Cool Sean. Thanks! I get it now with the 2' and 4' sides. That must be a 10' long trailer? ... 4 or 5' wide? How does the winch looking setup work? What is the advantage of the trailer hitch extension? Thanks.
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • Raj's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    Raj replied to a thread How'd it go today? in Odds and Ends
    Cargo strap an extension ladder to the trunk! ;)
    56069 replies | 1692653 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    Sorry to be dense.... but what is a "BS" ? thx
    49 replies | 877 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    haha, yeah that's what made me look at that one.... just wondering about anybody here..
    49 replies | 877 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    Yeah, the idea of fewer trips *really* appeals to me.
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • SeanKroll's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    A lot more work lifting hundreds of pounds higher. A fair-priced, used utility trailer is easy to sell for the same price. Every series of trips that is cut in half by doubling capacity means a lot of overall time and transportation money converted to trailer payments. You don't have to load as high, either, so less compression to fight if manually unloading.
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    I tell myself that safety is the main thing and I don't plan to do anything "risky" I'm not comfortable with and taking all known precautions. But it is a dangerous thing... I guess I think I can reduce my risk by keeping it to the smaller, "safer" sorts of things. I just got done loading my pickup with a row of wood (4'x8') to deliver tomorrow for my first firewood sale of the season. A trailer might help reduce the loading/unloading time by 15% or so.
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    What happened?
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    1 Hour Ago
    stig, there could be some of that going on with me. But then ever since I had the thrill of cutting down my first tree 15+ or so years ago, the chainsaw aspect (and then a little chainsaw milling) has stuck with me. I've made some stupid mistakes (e.g. cutting through the hinge of (to me) a big tree)... but have hopefully learned some. 10+ years or so ago, when I first saw a tree climber rigging a big limb he was removing -- off a natural crotch in the same tree -- it struck me as fascinating... including the "simplicity" of the concept. Truth is I probably would have been too chicken to consider climbing back then and never considered it. And it is from watching some older guys climbing relatively "simple" looking trees in the last year or so that started giving me the idea that maybe I could do it. Also Reg and August, etc. videos make great "advertisements" for the line of work, but I hope I have no illusions of that daredevil (to me) stuff. Also, there is definitely the aspect of physical fitness... handling brush and wood outdoors... to me it is very enjoyable. But there is the danger ... but I am thinking that maybe it will help keep my mind sharp too, more than just doing crossword puzzles, etc. But I may try to find somebody close by to see if I can work for part time.
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    2 Hours Ago
    haha, Butch, thanks for the idea... and I really don't relish the owner/business part of things ... but at best I would/will be only climbing the smallest, easiest, safest trees :)
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
  • rfwoody's Avatar
    2 Hours Ago
    DMc, I know you have a good point.... but I've been carrying brush/wood in my pickup bed for a couple of years and many loads (e.g. free tree removals (from the ground) and cleanups .... initially thinking for firewood business)... in fact my avitar picture is my first "public" tree "removal" job I did for a church down the road mockernut(?) hickory the wind knocked down... a lot of trips for it and others.....haha, so I sort of feel like I've "paid my dues" as far as hauling brush and logs in my pickup :) .... not to mention rolling big rounds up my 2x12"x10' planks into my tall pickup bed :) ..... but thanks for the food for thought! but when/if I get in the right frame of mind I'm almost ready to pull the trigger on the climbing gear.
    63 replies | 532 view(s)
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